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This is a draft edition of the 2014-15 Catalog; the final edition will be published in late summer 2014.

Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science

Chair

  • Richard K. Shields

Faculty

Professors

  • Annunziato Amendola (Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science/Health and Human Physiology/Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation), David Asprey (Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science/Pediatrics/Physician Assistant Studies and Services), Thomas Cook (Occupational and Environmental Health/International Programs/Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science), Warren Darling (Health and Human Physiology/Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science), Richard K. Shields, Kathleen A. Sluka

Associate professors

  • Joseph Chen (Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science/Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation), Kelly Cole (Health and Human Physiology/Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science), Laura A. Frey Law, Barbara Rakel (Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science/Nursing), Glenn N. Williams, Brian R. Wolf (Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science/Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation), H. John Yack

Assistant professors

  • Darren P. Casey, Stacey L. DeJong

Lecturer

  • Byron Bork

Associates

  • Marcie Becker, Kelly Sass, Carol Vance, David Williams

Adjunct associate professor

  • Bryon Ballantyne

Adjunct assistant professors

  • Pamela A. Duffy, Kim Eppen, Masaki Iguchi

Adjunct associates

  • Lisa Ainsworth, Amy Baker, Rhonda Barr, Sarah Bengtson, Randy Boldt, Michelle Borgwardt, Molly Camacho, Leslie Carpenter, Nicholas Cooper, Wendy Craft, Dana Dailey, Matt Ehler, Richard Evans, Robb Gardner, Jerry F. Gillon, Catherine Hahn, Jaclyn Hall, Scott Harms, James Holte, Michael Horsfield, Melanie House, Alexas Ihrig, Judy Jicinsky, Patrick Johnston, Carol Kelderman, Janine Kelly, Lisabeth Kestel, Jill Kilkenny, Amy Kimball, Kevin Komenda, Paul Kraushaar, Bret Kruthoff, Tami Lansing, Ken Leo, Joseph A. Leone, Shannon Miers, Bruce Miller, Joy Miller, Shelley Mockler, Joseph Nelson, Debra Parrott, Erin Pazour, Andrew Phillips, Michael Reiling, Elayne Sexsmith, Michael Shaffer, Mary Shepherd, Kolleen Shields, Jamie Smelser, Susan Sohrweide, Sherry Steffen, Travis Sterling, Patrick Swancutt, Margaret Thomas, Blake Tiedtke, Amy Uitermark, Barbara Van Gorp, Elizabeth Vermeer

Professors emeriti

  • David H. Nielsen, Gary L. Smidt, Gary L. Soderberg
Graduate degrees: D.P.T.; M.A. in physical therapy; Ph.D. in physical rehabilitation science
Web site: http://www.medicine.uiowa.edu/pt/

Physical therapists provide services to patients and clients who have impairments, functional limitations, disabilities, pain, or changes in physical function resulting from injury, disease, or other causes. Physical therapists practice and collaborate with a variety of health professionals. In the area of health promotion and wellness, they provide screening examinations, prescribe fitness programs, and educate the public regarding healthy lifestyles. Research, teaching, consultation, and administration also are parts of a physical therapist's professional role.

A wide variety of opportunities exist for professional practice in inpatient, outpatient, and community-based settings. Examples include practice in general or specialized hospitals, programs for children with disabilities, private physical therapy clinics, extended care facilities, nursing homes, community and governmental agencies, rehabilitation centers, the armed forces, foreign service, home health agencies, school systems, fitness centers, and athletic facilities. Research and teaching careers in academic institutions are available for those who earn a Ph.D. in rehabilitation science.

The Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science is located in the Carver College of Medicine on the University of Iowa health sciences campus, which includes University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, one of the nation's largest university-owned teaching hospitals. The department has eight state-of-the-art independent research laboratories and is well equipped for classroom and laboratory instruction and innovative research. Students have access to faculty members in the basic sciences and medicine, basic sciences courses, clinical specialty expertise, and innovative learning experiences associated with a medical college environment.

Graduate Programs of Study

  • Doctor of Physical Therapy
  • Master of Arts in physical therapy
  • Doctor of Philosophy in physical rehabilitation science

The Doctor of Physical Therapy (D.P.T.) is the entry-level professional degree for physical therapists. The Master of Arts in physical therapy is granted to students working toward the Doctor of Philosophy in physical rehabilitation science. Each year 36 students are admitted to the D.P.T. program and around 20 students are enrolled in the Ph.D. program.

Doctor of Physical Therapy

The Doctor of Physical Therapy requires a minimum of 101 s.h. and is completed in two and one-half years. The program is fully accredited by the Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education. Satisfactory completion of the professional program qualifies candidates to take the National Physical Therapy Examination for licensure to practice. The minimum passing score on the exam is the same in all jurisdictions.

Technical Standards for Graduation

Doctor of Physical Therapy graduates must possess and demonstrate the physical and cognitive skills and character attributes required to provide physical therapy services in a broad variety of clinical situations and environments. All D.P.T. candidates must perform, with or without reasonable accommodation, the following skills safely, effectively, efficiently, and in compliance with the legal and ethical standards set by the American Physical Therapy Association Code of Ethics and Standards of Practice:

  • communicate effectively through appropriate verbal, nonverbal, and written communication with patients, families, and others;
  • demonstrate ability to apply universal precautions;
  • utilize appropriate tests and measures in order to perform a physical therapy examination; examples include, but are not limited to, examination and evaluation of cognitive/mental status, vital signs, skin and vascular integrity, wound status, endurance, segmental length, girth, volume, sensation, strength, tone, reflexes, movement patterns, coordination, balance, developmental stage, soft tissue, joint motion/play, cranial and peripheral nerve function, posture, gait, functional abilities, assistive devices fit/use, psychosocial needs, and the pulmonary system;
  • demonstrate the ability to reach diagnostic and therapeutic judgments through analysis and synthesis of data gathered during patient/client examination in order to develop an appropriate plan of care;
  • perform fully, or in a reasonably independent manner, physical therapy interventions appropriate to the patient's status and desired goals;
  • apply teaching/learning theories and methods in health care and community environments;
  • accept criticism and respond by appropriate behavior modification;
  • possess the perseverance, diligence, and consistency to complete the physical therapy curriculum and enter the practice of physical therapy.

Applicants with health conditions or disabilities who need accommodation to meet the technical standards for graduation should contact the University's Student Disability Services office.

Curriculum

The Doctor of Physical Therapy degree requires the following course work (total of 101 s.h.) and the option to take an additional 3 s.h. in electives.

First Summer Session
PTRS:5101 (101:140) Introduction to Physical Therapy Practice2 s.h.
PTRS:5102 (101:141) Principles of Physical Therapy I2 s.h.
PTRS:5205 (101:205) Health Promotion and Wellness3 s.h.
First Semester (Fall)
PTRS:5100 (101:120) Professional Issues and Ethics1 s.h.
PTRS:5103 (101:142) Principles of Physical Therapy II2 s.h.
PTRS:5209 (101:209) Surface Anatomy1 s.h.
PTRS:5210 (101:210) Kinesiology and Pathomechanics4 s.h.
PTRS:5235 (101:235) Case-Based Learning I1 s.h.
PTRS:5790 (101:189) Clinical Education I1 s.h.
ACB:5108 (060:108) Human Anatomy5 s.h.
PATH:8133 (069:133) Introduction to Human Pathology for Graduate Students4 s.h.
Second Semester (Spring)
PTRS:5131 (101:131) Therapeutic Physical Agents2 s.h.
PTRS:5144 (101:244) Interprofessional Education I: Team-Based Approach to Health Care1 s.h.
PTRS:5201 (101:185) Musculoskeletal Therapeutics I3 s.h.
PTRS:5206 (101:206) Cardiopulmonary Therapeutics3 s.h.
PTRS:5215 (101:201) Applied Clinical Medicine2 s.h.
PTRS:5236 (101:236) Case-Based Learning II1 s.h.
PTRS:5791 (101:190) Clinical Education II1 s.h.
ACB:8114 (060:234) Medical Neuroscience4 s.h.
Second Summer Session
PTRS:6120 (101:119) Physical Therapy Management and Administration I2 s.h.
PTRS:6143 (101:143) Selected Topics in Physical Therapy Practice2 s.h.
PTRS:6176 (101:176) Pharmacology for Physical Therapists3 s.h.
PTRS:6794 (101:194) Clinical Internship3 s.h.
Third Semester (Fall)
PTRS:6122 (101:122) Psychosocial Aspects of Patient Care1 s.h.
PTRS:6134 (101:134) Physical Therapy Management of Integumentary System2 s.h.
PTRS:6145 (101:245) Interprofessional Education II: Teaching Neural and Musculoskeletal Evaluation Principles1 s.h.
PTRS:6170 (101:170) Prosthetics and Orthotics2 s.h.
PTRS:6200 (101:200) Pediatric Physical Therapy2 s.h.
PTRS:6202 (101:202) Musculoskeletal Therapeutics II3 s.h.
PTRS:6224 (101:224) Activity-Based Neural and Musculoskeletal Plasticity in Health Care4 s.h.
PTRS:6237 (101:237) Service Learning I1 s.h.
PTRS:6250 (101:248) Research in Physical Therapy2 s.h.
Fourth Semester (Spring)
PTRS:6121 (101:121) Physical Therapy Management and Administration II1 s.h.
PTRS:6133 (101:133) Pain Mechanisms and Treatment2 s.h.
PTRS:6172 (101:172) Radiology/Imaging for Physical Therapists2 s.h.
PTRS:6173 (101:173) Differential Diagnosis in Physical Therapy2 s.h.
PTRS:6203 (101:203) Musculoskeletal Therapeutics III4 s.h.
PTRS:6204 (101:151) Progressive Functional Exercise2 s.h.
PTRS:6225 (101:225) Neuromuscular Therapeutics3 s.h.
PTRS:6238 (101:238) Service Learning II1 s.h.
PTRS:6251 (101:251) Critical Inquiry in Physical Therapy I2 s.h.
PTRS:6792 (101:191) Clinical Education III1 s.h.
Third Summer Session
PTRS:6794 (101:194) Clinical Internship4 s.h.
Fifth Semester (Fall)
PTRS:6252 (101:252) Critical Inquiry in Physical Therapy II1 s.h.
PTRS:6794 (101:194) Clinical Internship8 s.h.

Admission

Applicants must meet the admission requirements of the Graduate College; see the Manual of Rules and Regulations of the Graduate College or the Graduate College section of the Catalog. They must have completed a baccalaureate degree from an accredited institution in the United States, or anticipate completing the degree before enrolling in the D.P.T. program. They must have a cumulative g.p.a. of at least 3.00 and must have completed the following prerequisite course work, preferably with a g.p.a. of at least 3.00. All science courses must include the appropriate laboratory instruction. The prerequisite courses must have been taken for a letter grade. Credit awarded through advanced placement testing may be applied only to the mathematics requirement.

Biological sciences: a complete introductory course in principles of general biology or zoology and advanced course work in biology or zoology (for which an introductory course is prerequisite) equivalent to 12 s.h.

Physics: a complete introductory course equivalent to 8 s.h.

Chemistry: a complete introductory course equivalent to 8 s.h.

Physiology: a systemic human physiology course equivalent to 3 s.h.

Psychology: courses equivalent to 6 s.h.

Mathematics: a college-level mathematics course, at the level of trigonometry or higher, equivalent to 3 s.h.

Statistics: a statistical methods course equivalent to 3 s.h.

All applicants must take the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) General Test. They must take the test early enough for their scores to be received by the University in time for the November 1 application deadline.

Applications are submitted online through the Physical Therapist Centralized Application Service (PTCAS). PTCAS allows applicants to use a single application and one set of materials to apply to multiple physical therapy programs. Once the application portfolio is complete, PTCAS forwards it to The University of Iowa.

Personal interviews are required of applicants selected for consideration by the admissions committee. Interviews are conducted at The University of Iowa. The physical therapy admissions committee selects applicants who appear to be best qualified for the study and practice of the profession. Some preference is given to Iowa residents.

Applications are accepted from July 1 to November 1 for entry the following summer. Prospective students should apply as early as possible.

EARLY ADMISSION

We do not participate in the Early Decision status through PTCAS. We do, however, offer an early admission plan to outstanding applicants. Early admission applicants must have outstanding grade-point averages, generally 3.75 or higher. They also must have Graduate Record Examination (GRE) General Test scores at or above the 50th percentile for both the verbal and the quantitative sections. Application materials are the same as those for regular admission. Application deadline for the early admission plan is September 15; applicants are notified of admission by December 1. Those who are interviewed but are not selected for early admission are automatically placed in the final general applicant pool. Contact the Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science for more information.

Background Checks

Enrollment in the Doctor of Physical Therapy program is contingent on a successful criminal background check. Drug screening may be required for some clinical rotations.

Expenses

Applicants admitted to the D.P.T. program must make an advance tuition payment of $300, which is forfeited if the applicant does not enroll. In addition to paying University tuition and fees, students are assessed laboratory fees for the human anatomy and medical neuroscience courses and are responsible for purchasing supplies, such as lab coats, patient evaluation kits, and course syllabi.

All students are required to comply with the pre-entry and periodic health screening program developed by Student Health & Wellness in cooperation with University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics. Students must pay for the health screenings. Students also are required to have health insurance.

Ph.D. in Physical Rehabilitation Science

The Doctor of Philosophy in physical rehabilitation science requires a minimum of 72 s.h. of graduate credit. The program is designed to advance the student's ability to independently develop and carry out research that establishes the scientific basis for prevention, evaluation, and treatment of impairments, functional limitations, and disability. The curriculum is flexible enough to accommodate research focusing on basic, applied, or clinical studies in the rehabilitation sciences. Students have access to the program's research laboratories (see "Research Facilities" later in this section).

Graduates who complete the program are prepared for academic appointments that emphasize research, scholarship, and teaching. They possess:

  • theoretical and scientific knowledge to perform basic, applied, or clinical-level original research that leads to scientific presentations, publication in peer-reviewed journals, and competition for extramural funding through scientific grant writing;
  • breadth of knowledge in exercise physiology, biomechanic, neuroscience, or motor control specialty areas as they relate to impairment, functional limitation, and disability; and
  • theoretical and practical skills required for college or university teaching at the professional entry and advanced graduate levels.

Curriculum

Ph.D. students complete a minimum of 72 s.h. beyond the baccalaureate. Each student and his or her faculty advisor develop an individualized study plan. A preliminary study plan is developed within the first 9 s.h. of graduate study; a final plan is submitted to the Graduate College when the Ph.D. comprehensive examination is scheduled.

To ensure breadth of knowledge, all students complete specific core, research, and scientific specialty area content courses. Elective courses are selected to provide in-depth study of the specialty; they are complemented by an advanced seminar course specific to the student's specialty and taken in preparation for the comprehensive examination.

Students must satisfactorily complete the comprehensive examination, which is taken after all required course work is completed. Doctoral study culminates with 12 s.h. of thesis research and an oral examination.

GENERAL CORE REQUIREMENT

Ph.D. students must complete the following core requirements. Exception: the capstone course PTRS:7900 (101:300) Rehabilitation Research Capstone Project is recommended but not required for students who enter the program with a master's or doctoral-level degree; however, it is required for all students who enter the program with a bachelor's degree.

All of these:

PTRS:7812 (101:212) Biomedical Instrumentation and Measurement3 s.h.
PTRS:7820 (101:220) Seminar in Rehabilitation Science (taken twice)2 s.h.
PTRS:7826 (101:326) Scientific Writing in Rehabilitation Science3 s.h.
PTRS:7880 (101:280) Teaching Practicumarr.
PTRS:7900 (101:300) Rehabilitation Research Capstone Projectarr.
GRAD:7270 (650:270) Principles of Scholarly Integrity1 s.h.
GRAD:7604 (650:604) Principles of Scholarly Integrity0 s.h.
GRAD:7614 (650:614) Principles of Scholarly Integrity0 s.h.
PSQF:7385 (07P:385) Teaching and Learning in Higher Education3 s.h.

One of these:

BIOS:5110 (171:161) Introduction to Biostatistics3 s.h.
STAT:4143 (22S:102) Introduction to Statistical Methods3 s.h.

One of these:

BIOS:5120 (171:162) Design and Analysis of Biomedical Studies3 s.h.
STAT:6513 (22S:148) Intermediate Statistical Methods4 s.h.
RESEARCH REQUIREMENT

Students complete at least 24 s.h. from the following.

PTRS:7884 (101:284) Practicum in Researcharr.
PTRS:7895 (101:214) Advanced Seminar in Rehabilitation Science3 s.h.
PTRS:7925 (101:325) Independent Studyarr.
PTRS:7927 (101:327) Research in Rehabilitation Sciencearr.
PTRS:7990 (101:301) Thesis: Rehabilitation Science12 s.h.
SPECIALTY CONTENT REQUIREMENT

Each student must complete at least 9 s.h. in his or her scientific specialty area. Students may choose courses from the following list, but other courses suited to the student's background knowledge and interest area are considered.

Anatomy and Cell Biology
ACB:8401 (060:232) Advanced Human Anatomyarr.
Epidemiology
EPID:6900 (173:290) Design of Intervention and Clinical Trials3 s.h.
Health and Human Physiology
HHP:4130 (027:155) Skeletal Muscle Physiology3 s.h.
HHP:4220 (027:197) Biomechanics of Human Motion3 s.h.
HHP:4300 (027:160) Neural Control of Posture and Movement3 s.h.
HHP:4410 (027:141) Exercise Physiology3 s.h.
HHP:4460 (027:145) Cardiovascular Physiology3 s.h.
HHP:6300 (027:314) Seminar in Motor Control1 s.h.
Neuroscience
ACB:8114 (060:234) Medical Neuroscience4 s.h.
NSCI:7180 (132:180) Neurobiology4 s.h.
NSCI:7235 (132:235) Neurobiology of Disease3 s.h.
Occupational and Environmental Health
OEH:4310 (175:190) Occupational Ergonomics I3 s.h.
OEH:6310 (175:295) Clinical Ergonomics3 s.h.
OEH:6320 (175:294) Occupational Ergonomics II3 s.h.
Pharmacology
PCOL:5137 (071:137) Neurotransmitters1 s.h.
PCOL:6035 (071:235) Topics in Pain and Analgesia1 s.h.
PCOL:6250 (071:250) Advanced Problem Solving in Pharmacological Sciences1 s.h.
Physical Therapy
PTRS:5210 (101:210) Kinesiology and Pathomechanics4 s.h.
PTRS:6224 (101:224) Activity-Based Neural and Musculoskeletal Plasticity in Health Care4 s.h.
PTRS:7875 (101:275) Analysis of Activity-Based Neural and Musculoskeletal Plasticity3 s.h.
PTRS:7885 (101:285) Biomechanical Analysis in Rehabilitation3 s.h.
PTRS:7899 (101:899) Introduction to Pain: Overview of Theories, Concepts, and Mechanisms1 s.h.
PTRS:7901 (101:901) Clinical Correlates of Pain: Syndromes and Management1 s.h.
PTRS:7902 (101:902) Molecular, Cellular, and Neural Mechanisms of Pain1 s.h.

Admission

Applicants must meet the admission requirements of the Graduate College; see the Manual of Rules and Regulations of the Graduate College or the Graduate College section of the Catalog. They should have a cumulative g.p.a. of at least 3.00 and scores at or above the 50th percentile for each section of the Graduate Record Exam (GRE) General Test. A minimum of two years of clinical experience is desirable.

Applicants whose first language is not English must score at least 600 on the paper-based (PBT) or at least 100 on the Internet-based (iBT) Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL).

Application materials must include a complete Graduate College application form, test scores, transcripts, three letters of recommendation, and a statement of purpose. Completed applications should be sent to the Department of Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science.

Personal interviews are required of all applicants selected for consideration by the admissions committee. On-campus interviews are preferred, but telephone interviews may be substituted when necessary.

Application deadlines are October 15 for spring semester entry (notification by December 15); March 15 for summer entry (notification by May 15); and May 15 for fall semester entry (notification by July 15).

Financial Support

A number of research assistantships are available for Ph.D. students. Faculty advisors provide guidance for students seeking external scholarship support through foundations and federal programs that support Ph.D. training.

Research Facilities

The department's state-of-the-art research facilities include the Orthopedic Gait Analysis Laboratory and a spinal cord research laboratory at University Hospitals and Clinics; the Human Movement Control/Performance Laboratory; the Musculoskeletal Biomechanics and Sports Medicine Research Laboratory; the Neurobiology of Pain LaboratoryNeuromuscular Biomechanics LaboratoryHuman Integrative and Cardiovascular Physiology Laboratory; and the Applied Neuroplasticity Laboratory. Use of other laboratories may be arranged.

Courses

PTRS:5100 (101:120) Professional Issues and Ethics1 s.h.
Evolution of physical therapy and rehabilitation science as a profession; contemporary issues in education and practice; ethical theory and approaches to analyzing and acting on ethical problems; professional and peer relationships.
 
PTRS:5101 (101:140) Introduction to Physical Therapy Practice2 s.h.
Lectures, case presentations, and group activities using the Guide to Physical Therapist Practice; elements of the patient/client management model, concepts of the disablement model, preferred practice patterns as applied in clinical problems; importance of professionalism, professional socialization; introduction to evidence‑based practice; competence in medical terminology.
 
PTRS:5102 (101:141) Principles of Physical Therapy I2 s.h.
Patient management skills: interviewing, medical history taking, vital signs, positioning, draping, transfers, body mechanics, assisted gait, wheelchairs, and negotiation of architectural barriers.
 
PTRS:5103 (101:142) Principles of Physical Therapy II2 s.h.
Continuation of PTRS:5102 (101:141); expansion of existing skills and provides new learning experiences in documentation, assessment of joint range of motion/goniometry, manual muscle testing, preambulatory intervention strategies, gait analysis; musculoskeletal, neuromuscular, and integumentary systems review. Prerequisites: PTRS:5102 (101:141).
 
PTRS:5131 (101:131) Therapeutic Physical Agents2 s.h.
Theoretical and practical applications for safe, effective use of physical agents (superficial and deep heat, cold, hydrotherapy), electrotherapeutic modalities (biofeedback, NMES, TENS, iontophoresis); massage and soft tissue mobilization; emphasis on problem solving, clinical decision making.
 
PTRS:5144 (101:244) Interprofessional Education I: Team-Based Approach to Health Care1 s.h.
Development and interaction within small group of interprofessional students from physical therapy, medicine, pharmacy, dentistry, nursing, and public health; deans and faculty from each college facilitate; three‑hour initial session for all disciplines followed by informal monthly electronic scenarios, second formal meeting followed by informal monthly electronic discussions.
 
PTRS:5201 (101:185) Musculoskeletal Therapeutics I3 s.h.
Musculoskeletal techniques and biomechanical principles applied to assessment and evaluation of common orthopedic problems of the spine; problem solving, case‑study approach to clinical methods, skill acquisition.
 
PTRS:5205 (101:205) Health Promotion and Wellness3 s.h.
Overview of health promotion, fitness, and wellness strategies, including information on levels of health promotion, risk assessment, applied physiology (skeletal muscle, energy metabolism, and physiological responses to exercise), exercise testing and training guidelines, body composition assessment, and development of individual weight management and exercise training programs; classroom and laboratory experiences.
 
PTRS:5206 (101:206) Cardiopulmonary Therapeutics3 s.h.
Cardiorespiratory anatomy, physiology, and application of basic concepts, techniques in management of patients with acute and chronic cardiac, pulmonary disorders; laboratories.
 
PTRS:5209 (101:209) Surface Anatomy1 s.h.
Laboratory teaching activities that parallel the human anatomy course; observation, palpation, and problem solving skills; upper‑ and lower‑limb, head and neck, thorax, and abdomen.
 
PTRS:5210 (101:210) Kinesiology and Pathomechanics4 s.h.
Normal and pathological movement based on understanding of muscle mechanics, segment and joint mechanics, muscle function; instructor‑ and student‑centered learning experiences; EMG laboratories.
 
PTRS:5215 (101:201) Applied Clinical Medicine2 s.h.
Pathological disorders frequently encountered by physical therapists in clinical practice, addressed by physicians and health professionals who are not physical therapists; physical therapy management.
 
PTRS:5235 (101:235) Case-Based Learning I1 s.h.
Small group case study seminars and simulated patient instructor learning experiences; clinical problems coordinated with concurrent courses; student‑centered, problem‑based learning format with emphasis on evidence‑based practice objectives. First in a two‑course sequence.
 
PTRS:5236 (101:236) Case-Based Learning II1 s.h.
Small‑group case study seminars and simulated patient instructor learning experiences; clinical problems coordinated with concurrent courses taken in curriculum; student centered, problem‑based learning format; emphasis on evidence‑based practice objectives. Second in a two‑part series of integrated courses. Prerequisites: PTRS:5235 (101:235).
 
PTRS:5790 (101:189) Clinical Education I1 s.h.
Integrated clinical experiences in area physical therapy clinics; overview of the diverse nature of practice through half‑ or full‑day experience; basic skills in examination, intervention, documentation.
 
PTRS:5791 (101:190) Clinical Education II1 s.h.
Continuation of PTRS:5790 (101:189); integrated half‑day clinical experiences. Prerequisites: 101:189 (PTRS:5790 (101:189)).
 
PTRS:6120 (101:119) Physical Therapy Management and Administration I2 s.h.
The changing U.S. health care system; access to physical therapy services, reimbursement to health care providers, mechanisms for controlling costs while providing quality care; clinical vignettes, small group problem solving.
 
PTRS:6121 (101:121) Physical Therapy Management and Administration II1 s.h.
Principles of management in physical therapy practice; historical perspective, current health care environment; business principles; marketing, managing risk, medical/legal concerns, preparing for the future.
 
PTRS:6122 (101:122) Psychosocial Aspects of Patient Care1 s.h.
Emotional reactions to disability, psychosocial aspects of disability as they relate to patient‑physical therapist interaction; specific problems of the angry, non‑compliant, or chronic‑pain patient; complementary roles of other health professionals; cultural competence in professional behavior and patient treatment; importance of holistic health care.
 
PTRS:6133 (101:133) Pain Mechanisms and Treatment1-2 s.h.
Introduction to basic science mechanisms, assessment, and management of pain; basic science mechanism involved in transmission and perception of painful stimuli after tissue injury, assessment and physical therapy management of pain; emphasis on scientific principles and published literature to support treatment techniques.
 
PTRS:6134 (101:134) Physical Therapy Management of Integumentary System2 s.h.
Overview of physical therapy examination and management of the integumentary system; wound pathology, diagnosis associated with the integumentary system, inflammation and repair, examination and reexamination techniques, documentation, clinical decision making, lecture and laboratory formats; interventions, including patient/client information, physical agents, electrotherapy, wound dressing.
 
PTRS:6143 (101:143) Selected Topics in Physical Therapy Practice2 s.h.
Specialty topics in physical therapy; geriatrics, wheelchair seating/positioning, women's health, home health, industrial physical therapy; alternative or new treatments; guest lectures, lab component.
 
PTRS:6145 (101:245) Interprofessional Education II: Teaching Neural and Musculoskeletal Evaluation Principles1 s.h.
Active involvement in integrating anatomy, kinesiology, and movement control principles as applied to a select group of pathologies with the goal of being able to teach content area; preassigned student group leaders; emphasis on student as active learner; opportunity to teach academic areas previously studied in first and second years of curriculum; may include teaching several of these musculoskeletal principles in a first‑year medical student anatomy course.
 
PTRS:6170 (101:170) Prosthetics and Orthotics2 s.h.
Physical therapy management and assessment of patients in need of prosthetic and orthotic devices; principles and components of prosthetic and orthotic design and use.
 
PTRS:6172 (101:172) Radiology/Imaging for Physical Therapists2 s.h.
Basic principles and procedures for acquisition and interpretation of radiology and imaging in clinical practice and research; plain film radiographs, CT, MRI, other common imaging modalities; case‑based, multidisciplinary approach.
 
PTRS:6173 (101:173) Differential Diagnosis in Physical Therapy2 s.h.
Use of physical therapy examination and evaluation skills to diagnose physical therapy problems; focus on use of good clinical decision‑making skills when analyzing a patient's history and administering physical therapy tests and measures to confirm or rule out differential diagnoses; components of the medical examination; importance of collaboration between therapists and other health professionals; interactive case studies presented by clinical experts.
 
PTRS:6176 (101:176) Pharmacology for Physical Therapists3 s.h.
Contemporary pharmacology; overview of basic pharmokinetic and pharmacodynamic principles; relation of drug therapy to therapeutic interventions provided by physical therapists; small group clinical case presentations.
 
PTRS:6200 (101:200) Pediatric Physical Therapy2 s.h.
Preparation for physical therapy practice in pediatric settings using interdisciplinary family‑centered practice; normal and abnormal development, standardized assessment, service‑delivery settings, interventions, management strategies specific to pediatrics.
 
PTRS:6202 (101:202) Musculoskeletal Therapeutics II3 s.h.
Pathology, assessment, management of orthopedic disorders of the upper quarter; problem‑solving approach to evaluation and management of patients with musculoskeletal conditions. Prerequisites: PTRS:5201 (101:185).
 
PTRS:6203 (101:203) Musculoskeletal Therapeutics III4 s.h.
Pathology, assessment, management of orthopedic disorders of the lower quarter; problem‑solving approach to evaluation and management of patients with musculoskeletal conditions. Prerequisites: PTRS:6202 (101:202).
 
PTRS:6204 (101:151) Progressive Functional Exercise2 s.h.
Therapeutic exercise options (e.g., isometrics, isotonics, isokinetics, plyometrics, endurance exercises, stretching exercises) and training principles; application to functional activities, including those of daily living, work, recreation, and sport; laboratory component.
 
PTRS:6224 (101:224) Activity-Based Neural and Musculoskeletal Plasticity in Health Care4 s.h.
Examination of neural, muscular, and skeletal plasticity to increased and decreased use in normal and pathological states (chronic inactivity, obesity, metabolic syndromes, orthopedic and neurological injuries); principles of genetic regulation with physical activity including underlying mechanisms contributing to acute and chronic adaptations of muscle, spinal circuitry, and supra‑spinal centers; integration of movement control concepts through contemporary papers evaluating short and long latency reflexes, posture and balance control, spasticity, and motor learning in individuals with acute and chronic perturbations to the nervous system.
 
PTRS:6225 (101:225) Neuromuscular Therapeutics3 s.h.
Application of clinical neuroscience knowledge and motor control and motor learning concepts to the practice of neurological physical therapy; emphasis on diagnosis and therapeutic intervention for persons with central nervous system dysfunction of adult onset. Prerequisites: PTRS:6224 (101:224).
 
PTRS:6237 (101:237) Service Learning I1 s.h.
Service‑learning work experience with community partners; students develop individual learning goals for these experiences; classroom reflection on service activities, experiences with elderly and/or disabled, and social responsibility, advocacy, and professionalism in physical therapy; written reflection assignments. First in a two‑course sequence.
 
PTRS:6238 (101:238) Service Learning II1 s.h.
Service‑learning work experience with community partners; students develop individual learning goals for these experiences; classroom reflection on service activities, experiences with elderly and/or disabled, and social responsibility, advocacy, and professionalism in physical therapy; written reflection assignments. Second in a two‑course sequence. Prerequisites: PTRS:6237 (101:237).
 
PTRS:6250 (101:248) Research in Physical Therapy2 s.h.
Topics relevant to evidence‑based practice and research design; identification of appropriate questions for research and clinical applications, location and evaluation of available evidence, identification of issues that affect validity of research designs, interpretation of basic statistical analyses.
 
PTRS:6251 (101:251) Critical Inquiry in Physical Therapy I2 s.h.
Experience conducting group research projects under faculty supervision; data collection and analysis, manuscript preparation, oral defense of research findings during a formal poster presentation. Prerequisites: PTRS:6250 (101:248).
 
PTRS:6252 (101:252) Critical Inquiry in Physical Therapy II1 s.h.
Principles and procedures learned in PTRS:6250 (101:248) and PTRS:6251 (101:251) applied to a clinical setting; students write and present a case report with an evidence‑based practice focus, using a clinical case from their final internships. Requirements: Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science Program enrollment.
 
PTRS:6792 (101:191) Clinical Education III1 s.h.
Two‑week, full‑time clinical experience in physical therapy clinics in Iowa, under the guidance of physical therapists; theory and practice of physical therapy procedures, competence building in basic skills. Prerequisites: PTRS:5791 (101:190).
 
PTRS:6794 (101:194) Clinical Internshiparr.
Full‑time clinical education divided among varied settings; development of competence in independent examination, evaluation, and treatment of patients under supervision of clinical faculty. Requirements: Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science Program enrollment.
 
PTRS:7812 (101:212) Biomedical Instrumentation and Measurement3 s.h.
Introduction to biomedical instrumentation and measurement; understanding sources of error and noise in biomedical research applications; basic circuit analysis, calibration of measurement tools, A/D conversion, digital filtering; lab components. Offered fall semesters of even years.
 
PTRS:7820 (101:220) Seminar in Rehabilitation Science1 s.h.
Exploration of research related to rehabilitation science; lectures by faculty, graduate students, and guest scholars with expertise in areas relevant to rehabilitation science (e.g., neuroscience, physiology, medicine, engineering, pharmacology, integrated physiology).
 
PTRS:7826 (101:326) Scientific Writing in Rehabilitation Science3 s.h.
Knowledge of and experience related to scientific writing, critical review of scientific literature, publication in the biomedical sciences, thesis/dissertation writing, grant writing, scientific presentation, writing used in academic and scientific careers.
 
PTRS:7875 (101:275) Analysis of Activity-Based Neural and Musculoskeletal Plasticity3 s.h.
Examination of neural, muscular, and skeletal plasticity to increased/decreased use in normal and pathological states (chronic inactivity, obesity, metabolic syndromes, orthopedic and neurological injuries); genetic regulation with physical activity and underlying mechanisms contributing to acute and chronic adaptations of muscle, spinal circuitry, and supra‑spinal centers; integration of movement control concepts through contemporary papers evaluating short and long latency reflexes, posture and balance control, spasticity, and motor learning in individuals with acute and chronic perturbations to the nervous system; individual research projects.
 
PTRS:7880 (101:280) Teaching Practicumarr.
Individual instruction, observation, experimentation in teaching, guidance, analysis of evaluation processes in Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science Program.
 
PTRS:7884 (101:284) Practicum in Researcharr.
Laboratory experiences connected with investigative process; individual instruction, observation, activities in methodological development, data acquisition, data analysis aspects of research.
 
PTRS:7885 (101:285) Biomechanical Analysis in Rehabilitation3 s.h.
Assessment of pathological movement through human movement analysis techniques, including link segment modeling and analysis, mechanical energy and power analysis, electromyography and muscle modeling.
 
PTRS:7895 (101:214) Advanced Seminar in Rehabilitation Sciencearr.
Current status of research for biological, mechanical, psychological components pertinent to cardiopulmonary, musculoskeletal, neuromuscular areas of rehabilitation science; preparation for comprehensive exam.
 
PTRS:7899 (101:899) Introduction to Pain: Overview of Theories, Concepts, and Mechanisms1 s.h.
Overview of pain concepts and mechanisms; general overview of pain, models of pain, peripheral and central mechanisms, and pain inhibition. Requirements: prior neuroscience course.
 
PTRS:7900 (101:300) Rehabilitation Research Capstone Projectarr.
Specific phases of the research process; development of a research question and associated hypotheses, collection and analysis of data, interpretation and discussion of the information's meaning; presentation to sponsoring mentor's laboratory/program, and written document.
 
PTRS:7901 (101:901) Clinical Correlates of Pain: Syndromes and Management1 s.h.
Common pain conditions and management of pain using an interdisciplinary focus; lectures by University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics clinicians on a variety of acute and chronic pain conditions and management approaches. Requirements: prior neuroscience course.
 
PTRS:7902 (101:902) Molecular, Cellular, and Neural Mechanisms of Pain1 s.h.
Basic science mechanisms of pain and pain modulation; understanding molecular basis for pain in nociceptive afferents (peripheral sensitization), underlying molecular and neuronal mechanisms of central processing of pain (central sensitization), cortical pain processing, animal and human experimental pain models; readings from past and current literature. Prerequisites: PTRS:7901 (101:901). Requirements: prior neuroscience course.
 
PTRS:7903 (101:903) Rehabilitation Management of Pain1 s.h.
Basic principles of rehabilitation for pain control including education, exercise, and electrophysical modalities; evidence‑based approach to rehabilitation covering mechanisms of action and clinical effectiveness; case studies. Prerequisites: PTRS:7899 (101:899) and PTRS:7901 (101:901).
 
PTRS:7925 (101:325) Independent Studyarr.
Problem‑solving experience in physical therapy; commensurate with student's interest, ability.
 
PTRS:7927 (101:327) Research in Rehabilitation Sciencearr.
Placement of physical therapy on sound scientific base; therapy; initiation, refinement, establishment of methods in physical therapy evaluation, treatment; direct clinical and laboratory approach, philosophical treatise, or research proposal.
 
PTRS:7990 (101:301) Thesis: Rehabilitation Sciencearr.
Investigative process: formulation of problem, literature search and analysis, procedure for collecting data, data analysis, organization and writing of thesis proposal, thesis.