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This is a draft edition of the 2014-15 Catalog; the final edition will be published in late summer 2014.

Biochemistry

Chair

  • Charles M. Brenner

Faculty

Professors

  • E. Dale Abel, Charles M. Brenner, John M. Dagle, Adrian H. Elcock, Pamela K. Geyer, David H. Price, Peter A. Rubenstein, Debra A. Schwinn, Madeline A. Shea, Lori L. Wallrath, Daniel L. Weeks, Ronald Weigel, Marc S. Wold

Associate professors

  • Heather L. Bartlett, Kris A. DeMali, Andrew W. Norris, Maria Spies, M. Todd Washington

Assistant professors

  • Sheila A. Baker, Brandon S.J. Davies, Ernesto J. Fuentes, Catherine A. Musselman, Miles A. Pufall, Michael J. Schnieders, M. Ashley Spies

Lecturer

  • Elisabeth Swain

Adjunct professors

  • Theresa Gioannini, S. Ramaswamy, Nancy C. Stellwagen, Joseph Walder, Liping Yu

Adjunct assistant professors

  • Lokesh Gahkar, Meng Wu

Professors emeriti

  • Arthur Arnone, Thomas W. Conway, John Donelson, Alice B. Fulton, Rex Montgomery, Bryce Plapp, Arthur A. Spector, Earle Stellwagen, Charles A. Swenson
Undergraduate major: biochemistry (B.A., B.S.)
Graduate degrees: M.S. in biochemistry; Ph.D. in biochemistry
Web site: http://www.medicine.uiowa.edu/biochemistry/

Biochemistry is the study of basic chemical processes that occur in and govern all living systems. Nearly all areas of the life sciences engage in biochemical research.

Biochemistry graduates with bachelor's degrees often work as research assistants in industry, government, education, or health services; teach in secondary schools; or go on to advanced study in medicine, dentistry, or other areas. Those with advanced degrees pursue careers as teachers, researchers, or administrators in universities and medical schools, government, research agencies, and varied industries.

The Department of Biochemistry offers an undergraduate major and graduate degree programs and determines the curricula for those programs. Undergraduates majoring in biochemistry receive their degrees (Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science) from the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, and their studies are governed by that college's undergraduate academic policies. Graduate degrees in biochemistry are conferred by the Graduate College. 

Undergraduate Programs of Study

  • Major in biochemistry (Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science)

Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science

The Bachelor of Arts with a major in biochemistry requires a minimum of 120 s.h., including 57-58 s.h. of work for the major. The Bachelor of Science with a major in biochemistry requires a minimum of 120 s.h., including 69-70 s.h. of work for the major. Students must maintain a g.p.a. of at least 2.00 in all courses for the major and in all UI courses for the major. They also must complete the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences General Education Program.

The biochemistry major for the Bachelor of Arts degree provides a rigorous education in biochemical concepts and practice in the laboratory while giving students flexibility to specialize in additional disciplines or to obtain clinical volunteer experience. The B.A. program is intended for most students majoring in biochemistry, including those with pre-medicine, pre-pharmacy, pre-dental, and other pre-health professions interests. It also is appropriate for students earning more than one major.

The biochemistry major for the Bachelor of Science degree is intended primarily for students planning careers in research. The B.S. program prepares students to pursue graduate degrees, such as an M.S., Ph.D., or joint M.D./Ph.D., or to work as research technicians. The B.S. program requires 12 s.h. more credit in science and laboratory electives than the B.A. program does.

The first two years of the curriculum are the same for all students majoring in biochemistry. Students decide to earn a B.A. or a B.S. during the second semester of their sophomore year, in consultation with their biochemistry advisor. Transfer students select the B.A. or B.S. after completing one semester at The University of Iowa and meeting with their biochemistry advisor.

Qualified students in either degree program may graduate with honors in the biochemistry major; see "Honors in the Major" below.

The major in biochemistry (B.A. and B.S.) requires the following work.

Common Requirements (B.A. and B.S.)

All biochemistry majors complete the following course work during their first two years.

All of these:

BIOL:1411 (002:031)-BIOL:1412 (002:032) Foundations of Biology - Diversity of Form and Function8 s.h.
CHEM:1110 (004:011) & CHEM:1120 (004:012) Principles of Chemistry I-II8 s.h.
MATH:1850 (22M:025) & MATH:1860 (22M:026) Calculus I-II8 s.h.

One of these:

CHEM:2210 (004:121) Organic Chemistry I3 s.h.
CHEM:2230 (004:123) Organic Chemistry I for Majors3 s.h.

One of these:

CHEM:2220 (004:122) Organic Chemistry II3 s.h.
CHEM:2240 (004:124) Organic Chemistry II for Majors3 s.h.

One of these:

CHEM:2410 (004:141) Organic Chemistry Laboratory3 s.h.
CHEM:2420 (004:142) Organic Chemistry Laboratory for Majors3 s.h.

One of these:

PHYS:1511 (029:011) College Physics I4 s.h.
PHYS:1611 (029:081) Introductory Physics I4 s.h.

One of these:

PHYS:1512 (029:012) College Physics II4 s.h.
PHYS:1612 (029:082) Introductory Physics II3-4 s.h.

All of these:

BIOC:3120 (099:120) & BIOC:3130 (099:130) Biochemistry and Molecular Biology I-II6 s.h.
BIOC:3140 (099:140) Experimental Biochemistry2 s.h.

Additional Requirements for the B.A.

In addition to the common requirements listed above, biochemistry majors who elect to earn a Bachelor of Arts must complete the following work.

One of these:

BIOC:5241 (099:241) Biophysical Chemistry I3 s.h.
BIOC:5242 (099:242) Biophysical Chemistry II3 s.h.
CHEM:4431 (004:131) Physical Chemistry I3 s.h.
CHEM:4432 (004:132) Physical Chemistry II3 s.h.

And:

Advanced science electives6 s.h.

Bachelor of Arts students intending to earn advanced degrees in the biological or health sciences are advised to earn at least 4 s.h. in BIOC:3115 (099:115) Undergraduate Independent Study or BIOC:4155 (099:155) Research, Independent Study. There are no prerequisites for BIOC:3115 (099:115)The course involves experience in an active biochemistry research lab, which must be arranged ahead of time with a supervising faculty member. Students may make arrangements directly with the faculty member, or they may request assistance from an undergraduate advisor. Credit earned in BIOC:3115 (099:115) does not count toward the major, but it does count toward the minimum of 120 s.h. required to graduate.

In order to register for BIOC:4155 (099:155) Research, Independent Study, students must have completed BIOC:3120 (099:120) Biochemistry and Molecular Biology IBIOC:3130 (099:130) Biochemistry and Molecular Biology II, and  BIOC:3140 (099:140) Experimental Biochemistry. They must have a grade average of B or higher in the three courses and a grade of B-minus or higher in each course. They also must have completed BIOC:3101 (099:101) Technical Communication in Biochemistry and should have prior research experience [e.g., BIOC:3115 (099:115) Undergraduate Independent Study or HONR:3200 (143:100) Honors Research Practicum] or consent of the instructor.

Additional Requirements for the B.S.

In addition to the common requirements listed above, biochemistry majors who elect to earn a Bachelor of Science must complete the following work.

Two of these:

BIOC:5241 (099:241) Biophysical Chemistry I3 s.h.
BIOC:5242 (099:242) Biophysical Chemistry II3 s.h.
CHEM:4431 (004:131) Physical Chemistry I3 s.h.
CHEM:4432 (004:132) Physical Chemistry II3 s.h.

All of these:

Advanced science electives9 s.h.
Advanced laboratory courses, including BIOC:4155 (099:155)6 s.h.

Students are encouraged to begin research by taking BIOC:3115 (099:115) Undergraduate Independent Study, which has no prerequisites. The course involves experience in an active biochemistry research lab, which must be arranged ahead of time with a supervising faculty member. Students may make arrangements directly with the faculty member, or they may request assistance from an undergraduate advisor. Credit earned in BIOC:3115 (099:115)  does not count toward the major, but it does count toward the minimum of 120 s.h. required to graduate.

In order to register for BIOC:4155 (099:155) Research, Independent Study, students must have completed BIOC:3120 (099:120) Biochemistry and Molecular Biology IBIOC:3130 (099:130) Biochemistry and Molecular Biology II, and BIOC:3140 (099:140) Experimental Biochemistry. They must have a grade average of B or higher in the three courses and a grade of B-minus or higher in each course. They also must have completed BIOC:3101 (099:101) Technical Communication in Biochemistry and should have prior research experience [e.g., BIOC:3115 (099:115) Undergraduate Independent Study or HONR:3200 (143:100) Honors Research Practicum] or consent of the instructor.

B.A. or B.S. with Teacher Licensure

Biochemistry majors interested in earning licensure to teach in elementary and/or secondary schools must complete the College of Education's Teacher Education Program (TEP) in addition to the requirements for the major and all requirements for graduation. The TEP requires several College of Education courses and student teaching. Contact the Office of Education Services for details.

Students must satisfy all degree requirements and complete Teacher Education Program licensure before degree conferral.

Four-Year Graduation Plan

The following checkpoints list the minimum requirements students must complete by certain semesters in order to stay on the University's Four-Year Graduation Plan. (Courses in the major are those required to complete the major; they may be offered by departments other than the major department.)

Bachelor of Arts

Before the third semester begins: CHEM:1110 (004:011) Principles of Chemistry I, CHEM:1120 (004:012) Principles of Chemistry II, MATH:1850 (22M:025) Calculus I, and MATH:1860 (22M:026) Calculus II 

Before the fifth semester begins: BIOL:1411 (002:031) Foundations of Biology, BIOL:1412 (002:032) Diversity of Form and Function, CHEM:2210 (004:121) Organic Chemistry I or CHEM:2230 (004:123) Organic Chemistry I for Majors, CHEM:2220 (004:122) Organic Chemistry II or CHEM:2240 (004:124) Organic Chemistry II for Majors, and CHEM:2410 (004:141) Organic Chemistry Laboratory or CHEM:2420 (004:142) Organic Chemistry Laboratory for Majors 

Before the seventh semester begins: PHYS:1611 (029:081) Introductory Physics I or PHYS:1511 (029:011) College Physics I, PHYS:1612 (029:082) Introductory Physics II or PHYS:1512 (029:012) College Physics II, BIOC:3120 (099:120) Biochemistry and Molecular Biology I, BIOC:3130 (099:130) Biochemistry and Molecular Biology II, BIOC:3140 (099:140) Experimental Biochemistry, two science electives, and at least 90 s.h. earned toward the degree

Before the eighth semester begins: CHEM:4431 (004:131) Physical Chemistry I or CHEM:4432 (004:132) Physical Chemistry II or BIOC:5241 (099:241) Biophysical Chemistry I or BIOC:5242 (099:242) Biophysical Chemistry II, and a science elective

During the eighth semester: enrollment in all remaining course work in the major, all remaining General Education courses, and a sufficient number of semester hours to graduate

Bachelor of Science

Before the third semester begins: CHEM:1110 (004:011) Principles of Chemistry I, CHEM:1120 (004:012) Principles of Chemistry II, MATH:1850 (22M:025) Calculus I, and MATH:1860 (22M:026) Calculus II 

Before the fifth semester begins: BIOL:1411 (002:031) Foundations of Biology, BIOL:1412 (002:032) Diversity of Form and Function, CHEM:2210 (004:121) Organic Chemistry I or CHEM:2230 (004:123) Organic Chemistry I for Majors, CHEM:2220 (004:122) Organic Chemistry II or CHEM:2240 (004:124) Organic Chemistry II for Majors, and CHEM:2410 (004:141) Organic Chemistry Laboratory or CHEM:2420 (004:142) Organic Chemistry Laboratory for Majors 

Before the seventh semester begins: PHYS:1611 (029:081) Introductory Physics I or PHYS:1511 (029:011) College Physics I, PHYS:1612 (029:082) Introductory Physics II or PHYS:1512 (029:012) College Physics II, BIOC:3120 (099:120) Biochemistry and Molecular Biology I, BIOC:3130 (099:130) Biochemistry and Molecular Biology II, BIOC:3140 (099:140) Experimental Biochemistry, and two science electives; BIOC:3101 (099:101) for students planning to take BIOC:4155 (099:155); and at least 90 s.h. earned toward the degree

Before the eighth semester begins: CHEM:4431 (004:131) Physical Chemistry I or CHEM:4432 (004:132) Physical Chemistry II or BIOC:5241 (099:241) Biophysical Chemistry I or BIOC:5242 (099:242) Biophysical Chemistry II, a science elective, and at least 3 s.h. of BIOC:4155 (099:155) Research, Independent Study 

During the eighth semester: enrollment in all remaining course work in the major, all remaining General Education courses, and a sufficient number of semester hours to graduate

Honors in the Major

Students majoring in biochemistry have the opportunity to graduate with honors in the major. Departmental honors students must maintain a cumulative University of Iowa g.p.a. of at least 3.33. To graduate with honors in the biochemistry major, students must earn 6 s.h. in BIOC:4155 (099:155) Research, Independent Study. They must present their research results in a report written in the form of a journal article and in an oral report given at a special open departmental seminar.

In addition to honors in their majors, undergraduate students have a variety of opportunities for honors study and activities through membership in the University of Iowa Honors Program; visit Honors at Iowa to learn about the University's honors program.

Joint B.S./Ph.D.

The joint Bachelor of Science/Doctor of Philosophy program in biochemistry permits students to transition into the Ph.D. program during their senior year and to count 12 s.h. of credit toward both the B.S. and Ph.D. requirements. The joint program provides a research-intensive experience and shortens the training time for students interested in pursuing independent biochemistry research careers. Students in the program receive financial support during the second half of their senior year and throughout their Ph.D. study.

Students must apply to enter the joint B.S./Ph.D. program. They must be pursuing a Bachelor of Science with a major in biochemistry, and by the beginning of their senior year they must:

  • have 108 s.h. of undergraduate credit;
  • have a minimum grade-point average of 3.50;
  • have completed four semesters of research experience (summer research counts as one semester); and
  • have completed BIOC:3120 (099:120) Biochemistry and Molecular Biology I, BIOC:3130 (099:130) Biochemistry and Molecular Biology II, and BIOC:3140 (099:140) Experimental Biochemistry.

Students interested in the joint program should speak with their academic advisor and the biochemistry honors advisor during their first year or at the beginning of their sophomore year. They should apply to the program in spring of their junior year; applications are due April 1. Application materials must include a letter of application and statement of purpose; official scores on the Graduate Record Exam (GRE) General Test; and three letters of recommendation, including at least one from a research advisor.

Graduate Programs of Study

  • Master of Science in biochemistry
  • Doctor of Philosophy in biochemistry

Students admitted to graduate study in biochemistry usually pursue the Doctor of Philosophy. Qualified students interested in earning the Doctor of Medicine along with the Ph.D. may apply to the Medical Scientist Training Program, which offers a joint M.D./Ph.D. program.

Master of Science

The Master of Science program in biochemistry requires a minimum of 32 s.h. of graduate credit, thesis research, and a thesis. See "Doctor of Philosophy" for information about the graduate curriculum.

Doctor of Philosophy

The Doctor of Philosophy program in biochemistry requires a minimum of 72 s.h. of graduate credit. Students complete 34 s.h. of course work and earn 38 s.h. of credit for research. The focus of the graduate program is on the individual student, so students work with the director of the biochemistry graduate programs to tailor the curriculum to their educational goals.

The Ph.D. in biochemistry requires the following work.

BIOC:5261 (099:261) Research Techniques (first-year laboratory rotation)1-5 s.h.
GRAD:7270 (650:270) Principles of Scholarly Integrity0-1 s.h.
Biophysical chemistry (students typically earn 6 s.h.); see "Biophysical chemistry requirement" below 3 s.h.
Molecular or cellular biology (students typically earn 6-8 s.h.); see "Molecular and cell biology requirement" below4 s.h.
Graduate seminar3 s.h.
Additional courses offered by the Department of Biochemistry and by other UI departments, as appropriate for the student's program of study13 s.h.
Research38 s.h.

Biophysical chemistry requirement: the following courses may be used to fulfill the 3 s.h. requirement. Students choose courses to meet their individual educational goals, completing one 3 s.h. course or a combination of three 1 s.h. courses (modules).

BIOC:5241 (099:241) Biophysical Chemistry I3 s.h.
BIOC:5242 (099:242) Biophysical Chemistry II3 s.h.
BIOC:5243 (099:243) Protein Structure, Function, and Regulation: Biophysical Chemistry Module 11 s.h.
BIOC:5244 (099:244) Ligand Binding and X-Ray Crystallography: Biophysical Chemistry Module 41 s.h.
BIOC:5245 (099:245) Protein Structure, Stability, and Folding: Biophysical Chemistry Module 21 s.h.
BIOC:5246 (099:246) Enzyme Kinetics and Enzyme Mechanisms: Biophysical Chemistry Module 51 s.h.
BIOC:5247 (099:247) Biophysics of Macromolecular Interactions: Biophysical Chemistry Module 31 s.h.
BIOC:5248 (099:248) Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy: Biophysical Chemistry Module 61 s.h.

Molecular and cell biology requirement: the following courses are among those that students may use to fulfill the molecular and cell biology requirement.

MCB:6215 (142:215) Transcription and Multi-Functional Regulation by RNA1 s.h.
MCB:6217 (142:217) Epigenetics, Cancer, and Mouse Models of Disease1 s.h.
MCB:6225 (142:225) Growth Factor Receptor Signaling1 s.h.
MCB:6226 (142:226) Cell Cycle Control1 s.h.
MCB:6227 (142:227) Cell Fate Decisions1 s.h.
BISC:5201 (156:201) Fundamentals of Gene Expression1 s.h.
BISC:5203 (156:203) Fundamentals of Dynamic Cell Processes1 s.h.
BISC:5204 (156:204) Biostatistics for Biomedical Research1 s.h.
BISC:5205 (156:205) Practical Bioinformatics1 s.h.
BISC:5265 (156:265) Biosciences Critical Thinking and Communication2 s.h.

Students take the comprehensive examination before the end of June in their second year, after which they are admitted formally to degree candidacy and begin to concentrate on thesis research. The program culminates in successful defense of completed thesis work before an examining committee.

In addition to meeting these requirements and those of the Graduate College, students are expected, as part of their training, to assist in teaching biochemistry for one semester.

Throughout the program, students are associated with faculty-directed research groups. They receive close personal attention from the biochemistry faculty members who serve as research advisors.

Admission

Most graduate students in biochemistry work toward a Doctor of Philosophy. Applicants who wish to earn a master's degree must contact the Department of Biochemistry before they apply.

The graduate program in biochemistry is flexible enough to accommodate students with bachelor's degrees in any of the biological, biochemical, or physical sciences. Appropriate preparation includes one-year, college-level courses in organic and physical chemistry, biology, physics, and mathematics through calculus. Students are expected to have had one or more introductory courses in biochemistry.

Applicants must have an undergraduate g.p.a. of at least 3.00 and must submit acceptable verbal, quantitative, and analytical scores on the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) General Test. Applicants are encouraged to submit their scores on the GRE Subject Test in Chemistry; Biology; or Biochemistry, Cell, and Molecular Biology.

Applicants must meet the admission requirements of the Graduate College; see the Manual of Rules and Regulations of the Graduate College or the Graduate College section of the Catalog.

Financial Support

Students admitted to the Ph.D. program in biochemistry routinely receive a stipend and tuition support.

Faculty and Research

The department's faculty members supervise research in biochemistry; molecular, cellular, developmental, computational, and structural biology; and model system genetics. Their work is supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health, the National Science Foundation, the American Heart Association, the American Cancer Society, the Muscular Dystrophy Association, and other sources. To learn more about the department's faculty members and areas of research, visit the Department of Biochemistry web site.

Facilities

The Department of Biochemistry occupies 36,700 square feet on the fourth floor of the Bowen Science Building and 7,500 square feet on the third floor of the Medical Education Research Facility on the University's health sciences campus. It has a number of well-equipped research laboratories; other departmental facilities include the Biochemistry Stores, the Mattill Biochemistry Reading Room, and the Heath Conference Room.

The department makes available a number of shared instruments; among them are an Applied PhotoPhysics stopped flow spectrometer SX20 (2009); a Jasco spectropolarimeter, model J815 (2010); a Horiba fluorlog-3 spectrofluorometer (2010); and a Beckman Coulter ultra XLI analytical centrifuge (1996).

Faculty, staff, and students in the department have access to a variety of shared Carver College of Medicine resources, including X-ray crystallography, the DNA Facility, the Medical NMR Facility, the Proteomics Facility, the Flow Cytometry Facility, the Gene Transfer Vector Core Facility, the Small Animal Imaging Core Facility, and the Transgenic and Genome Manipulation Facility. The University also supports resources such as the Central Microscopy Research Facilities and the High Throughput Screening Facility.

Courses

Upper-Level Undergraduate and Graduate

BIOC:3101 (099:101) Technical Communication in Biochemistry1 s.h.
Practical aspects of writing formal scientific papers and giving oral presentations on technical topics. Prerequisites: BIOC:3120 (099:120) or BIOC:3130 (099:130) or BIOC:3140 (099:140). Requirements: junior or senior biochemistry major pursuing a B.S. degree.
 
BIOC:3110 (099:110) Biochemistry3 s.h.
Basic concepts in modern biochemistry and molecular biology; understanding of life processes in molecular terms. Requirements: one year each of college‑level biology and chemistry. Recommendations: one semester of organic chemistry.
 
BIOC:3115 (099:115) Undergraduate Independent Studyarr.
Experience in an active biochemistry research lab, learning and performing experiments relevant to the current projects in that lab; exploration of scientific literature on topic of interest; arranged in advance by student and faculty member. Requirements: first‑year, sophomore, or junior standing.
 
BIOC:3120 (099:120) Biochemistry and Molecular Biology I3 s.h.
Physical and chemical foundations of biochemistry, structure of biological molecules, catalysis, transport, and oxidative reactions in biology; first course of two‑semester sequence that concludes with BIOC:3130 (099:130). Requirements: two semesters of general chemistry and one of organic chemistry. Recommendations: BIOL:1411 (002:031), BIOL:1412 (002:032), and an additional organic chemistry course.
 
BIOC:3130 (099:130) Biochemistry and Molecular Biology II3 s.h.
Carbohydrate biosynthesis, lipid metabolism, hormone regulation and integration of metabolism, signal transduction, genes and chromosomes, DNA replication and repair, transcription, RNA processing, protein translation and regulation of gene expression. Prerequisites: BIOC:3120 (099:120).
 
BIOC:3140 (099:140) Experimental Biochemistry2 s.h.
Use of modern instruments and techniques to fractionate, identify, and characterize constituents of biochemical systems. Prerequisites: BIOC:3120 (099:120). Requirements: grade of C or higher in BIOC:3120 (099:120), two semesters of general chemistry, and one semester of organic chemistry.
 
BIOC:4155 (099:155) Research, Independent Studyarr.
Independent study and research in areas of interest to the student; arranged in advance by student and biochemistry honors advisor. Requirements: grades of B‑ or higher in BIOC:3120 (099:120), BIOC:3130 (099:130), and BIOC:3140 (099:140); average grade of B or higher for all three courses; and BIOC:3115 (099:115) or HONR:3200 (143:100) or prior research experience or lab practicum.
 

Graduate

BIOC:5215 (099:215) Directed Readings for Graduate Studentsarr.
Directed readings with course content arranged with professor.
 
BIOC:5226 (099:226) Enzyme Kinetics and Bioorganic Mechanisms1-2 s.h.
Principles and applications of steady‑state and transient enzyme kinetics; mechanisms of catalysis of biochemical reactions. Prerequisites: BIOC:3120 (099:120).
 
BIOC:5241 (099:241) Biophysical Chemistry I3 s.h.
Principles and experimental approaches used to study structure and function of biological macromolecules; protein structure, stability, and dynamics; macromolecular interactions; common biophysical methods. Requirements: one year of biochemistry. Recommendations: physical chemistry course and one semester of calculus.
 
BIOC:5242 (099:242) Biophysical Chemistry II3 s.h.
Principles and experimental approaches used to study structure and function of biological macromolecules; ligand binding and enzyme catalysis; X‑ray crystallography; NMR spectroscopy. Requirements: one year of biochemistry. Recommendations: physical chemistry course and one semester of calculus.
 
BIOC:5243 (099:243) Protein Structure, Function, and Regulation: Biophysical Chemistry Module 11 s.h.
Overview of principles of protein structure, stability, folding, and dynamics; brief treatment of structural biology approaches to help students become critical users of models derived from X‑ray crystallography and NMR; taken alone or as part of BIOC:5241 (099:241). Requirements: introductory course in biochemistry. Same as BISC:5206 (156:206).
 
BIOC:5244 (099:244) Ligand Binding and X-Ray Crystallography: Biophysical Chemistry Module 41 s.h.
In‑depth examination of principles of ligand binding; experimental approaches to study interactions with small molecules, proteins, and nucleic acids; X‑ray crystallography in determining structures of biological macromolecules; taken alone or as part of BIOC:5242 (099:242). Requirements: introductory course in biochemistry.
 
BIOC:5245 (099:245) Protein Structure, Stability, and Folding: Biophysical Chemistry Module 21 s.h.
In‑depth examination of statistical thermodynamics and molecular forces in biological systems as related to protein structure, stability, and folding; nucleic acid structure and stability; taken alone or as part of BIOC:5241 (099:241). Requirements: introductory course in biochemistry.
 
BIOC:5246 (099:246) Enzyme Kinetics and Enzyme Mechanisms: Biophysical Chemistry Module 51 s.h.
Enzymes as unparalleled catalysts and representing a unique class of drug targets; organic chemistry of enzyme catalyzed reactions with emphasis on physical organic logic of sources of enzyme‑catalytic power; enzyme inhibition by small molecules from a medicinal chemistry perspective; taken alone or as part of BIOC:5242 (099:242). Requirements: introductory course in biochemistry. Same as PHAR:5566 (046:266).
 
BIOC:5247 (099:247) Biophysics of Macromolecular Interactions: Biophysical Chemistry Module 31 s.h.
In‑depth examination of protein‑protein interactions and protein‑nucleic acid interactions; implications in biological motility, transcription, and replication; taken alone or as part of BIOC:5241 (099:241). Requirements: introductory course in biochemistry.
 
BIOC:5248 (099:248) Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy: Biophysical Chemistry Module 61 s.h.
Basic principles of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and applications important for understanding structure and function of biological macromolecules; emphasis on methodology and experimental design, interpretation of data, and critical reading of literature; intended for graduate students with an interest in applications of NMR to problems of structural biology; taken alone or as part of BIOC:5242 (099:242). Requirements: one year of biochemistry. Recommendations: basic knowledge of spectroscopy and some previous exposure to NMR from basic chemistry courses.
 
BIOC:5261 (099:261) Research Techniques1-6 s.h.
Laboratory rotation for first‑year graduate students in biochemistry.
 
BIOC:5282 (099:282) Seminar0-1 s.h.
How to evaluate reports of scientific investigations critically; techniques for presenting scientific information.
 
BIOC:5875 (099:275) Perspectives in Biocatalysis1-3 s.h.
Applied enzymology, protein design, structure‑activity relationships, biosensor technology, microbial transformations, biodegradation of environmental pollutants. Requirements: graduate standing in a participating department supported by the Predoctoral Training Program in Biotechnology. Same as CHEM:5875 (004:275), PHAR:5875 (046:275), CBE:5875 (052:275), CEE:5875 (053:275), MICR:5875 (061:275).
 
BIOC:7251 (099:251) Introduction to Protein Structuresarr.
Basics of protein structures. Recommendations: first‑year graduate standing in biosciences or physical sciences.
 
BIOC:7252 (099:252) Enzymes, Carbohydrates, Nucleic Acids, and Bioenergeticsarr.
Basics of enzyme kinetics and enzyme mechanisms, carbohydrates, nucleic acids, and bioenergetics; module covers chapters 6, 7, 8, and 13 of Lehninger's Principles of Biochemistry. Recommendations: first‑year graduate standing in biosciences or physical sciences.
 
BIOC:7253 (099:253) Metabolism I1 s.h.
Basics of carbohydrate metabolism (glycolysis, gluconeogenesis, the pentose phosphate pathway), hormonal regulation of carbohydrate metabolism, the citric acid cycle, amino acid catabolism, oxidative phosphorylation; assignment of an advanced topic related to material, typically a recent research paper, extending inquiry beyond that presented in class and presented orally at end of five‑week module. Requirements: undergraduate biochemistry course or background in enzyme function.
 
BIOC:7254 (099:254) Metabolism II1 s.h.
Central carbon metabolism, carbohydrate biosynthesis in plants and bacteria, lipid structure/function, fatty acid catabolism, lipid biosynthesis, and biological membranes/transport; assignment of an advanced topic related to material, typically a recent research paper, extending inquiry beyond that presented in class and presented orally at end of five‑week module. Prerequisites: BIOC:7253 (099:253).
 
BIOC:7255 (099:255) Metabolism III and Biosignalingarr.
Basics of membranes and transport, biosignaling, nitrogen metabolism, integration of metabolism, genes, and chromosomes; module covers chapters 11, 12, 22, 23, and 24 of Lehninger's Principles of Biochemistry. Requirements: undergraduate biochemistry course. Recommendations: first‑year graduate standing in biosciences or physical sciences.
 
BIOC:7256 (099:256) Molecular Biology1 s.h.
DNA, RNA, and protein metabolism, regulation of gene expression, and DNA‑based information technologies.
 
BIOC:7292 (099:292) Research Biochemistryarr.
Thesis research.
 
BIOC:8101 (099:161) Biochemistry for Dental Students3 s.h.
Biochemical concepts and application to clinical problems. Requirements: CHEM:2210 (004:121) and D.D.S. enrollment. Recommendations: CHEM:2220 (004:122).
 
BIOC:8102 (099:162) Biochemistry for Pharmacy Students3 s.h.
Biochemical concepts and application to clinical problems. Requirements: CHEM:2210 (004:121) and Pharm.D. enrollment. Recommendations: CHEM:2220 (004:122).
 
BIOC:8204 (099:164) Biochemistry for Physician Assistant Students3 s.h.
Aspects of general biochemistry necessary for understanding the biochemical basis of human disease; analysis of appropriate clinical cases. Requirements: enrollment in Physician Assistant Studies and Services.