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This is a draft edition of the 2014-15 Catalog; the final edition will be published in late summer 2014.

Journalism and Mass Communication

Director

  • David M. Ryfe

Faculty

Professors

  • Julie Andsager, Daniel A. Berkowitz, Stephen G. Bloom, Meenakshi Gigi Durham, Judy Polumbaum, David M. Ryfe

Associate professors

  • Stephen Berry, Venise Berry, Frank Durham, Lyombe Eko, Donald McLeese, Jane Singer, Sujatha Sosale

Assistant professors

  • Kajsa Dalrymple, Brian Ekdale, Thomas Oates (American Studies/Journalism and Mass Communication), Melissa Tully, Travis Vogan (Journalism and Mass Communication/American Studies), Rachel Young

Lecturer

  • Ann Haugland

Professors emeriti

  • Joseph Ascroft, Gilbert Cranberg, Pamela J. Creedon, Carolyn Stewart Dyer, John Kimmich, Kenneth Starck, Al Talbott

Associate professors emeriti

  • John Erickson, Sue Lafky
Undergraduate major: journalism and mass communication (B.A., B.S.)
Undergraduate minor: mass communication
Graduate degrees: M.A. in journalism; M.A. in strategic communication; Ph.D. in mass communications
Web site: http://clas.uiowa.edu/sjmc/

The School of Journalism and Mass Communication offers an undergraduate major and minor as well as graduate degree programs. Undergraduate students in all majors may use approved journalism and mass communication courses to satisfy the General Education Program's Historical Perspectives, Social Sciences, and Values, Society, and Diversity requirements, and the school's First-Year Seminar is designed specifically for entering undergraduate students.

Undergraduate Programs of Study

  • Major in journalism and mass communication (Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science)
  • Minor in mass communication

Media writing and visual storytelling form the core of the undergraduate major in journalism and mass communication. Students are required to take both professional and conceptual courses offered by the school; they develop professional skills while studying the historical, legal, cultural, and institutional roles of media in society. They also complete extensive academic work outside the school, consistent with the University's commitment to the liberal arts and sciences.

The major prepares students for careers in the field. Graduates find employment in a variety of areas, such as public relations, advertising, marketing, political communication, health communication, philanthropy and fundraising communication, newspapers, magazines, radio, television, online communications and social media, publication design, photojournalism, and media research.

The school is accredited by the Accrediting Council on Education in Journalism and Mass Communications.

ADMISSION TO THE MAJOR

Undergraduate students are admitted to the major in journalism and mass communication in one of two ways.

First-year students who enter the University as honors students in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences or as Presidential Scholars, Old Gold Scholars, or Daily Iowan Scholars are guaranteed admission to the major as long as they have satisfied the necessary prerequisites.

Students who do not enter the University as honors students, Presidential Scholars, Old Gold Scholars, or Daily Iowan Scholars may declare a journalism and mass communication interest and must apply for admission to the major. They typically apply during the semester in which they will complete JMC:1100 (019:090) Media Uses and Effects and JMC:1200 (019:091) Media History and Culturethe General Education Program's Rhetoric requirement; and a total of at least 30 s.h. of course work.

The primary consideration for admission to the major is overall academic performance. Other factors include performance in journalism courses, a statement of interest submitted by the student, and writing ability. All qualified applicants are considered, with overall grade-point average as a major factor in admission. The number of students accepted each semester depends on the number of students currently in the program and available resources. Applications are reviewed with the goal of admitting the most qualified students to the program.

For applications and deadline information, contact the School of Journalism and Mass Communication.

TRANSFER STUDENTS

Transfer students with a declared interest in journalism and mass communication are classified as pre-journalism and mass communication majors. They may apply for admission to the major during the semester in which they will complete at least 30 s.h. of course work at The University of Iowa and other institutions, including the General Education Program's Rhetoric requirement and the two required premajor foundation courses, JMC:1100 (019:090) Media Uses and Effects and JMC:1200 (019:091) Media History and Culture. Students must complete JMC:1100 (019:090) and JMC:1200 (019:091) at The University of Iowa; they may not substitute courses completed at other institutions for either course.

The School of Journalism and Mass Communication may accept transfer credit in journalism earned at institutions accredited by the Accrediting Council on Education in Journalism and Mass Communications. A maximum of 7 s.h. of approved transfer credit may be applied to the major in journalism and mass communication; a maximum of 3 s.h. of approved transfer credit may be applied to the minor in mass communication. Some journalism course work taken at other schools may be used to fulfill the major's elective and/or second area of concentration requirements.

Students who wish to apply transfer credit toward School of Journalism and Mass Communication requirements must discuss the proposed transfer credit with a journalism faculty advisor and must have approval from the head of undergraduate studies.

Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science

The Bachelor of Arts and the Bachelor of Science with a major in journalism and mass communication require a minimum of 120 s.h., including at least 36 s.h. in journalism and mass communication courses, plus a second major or 24 s.h. in a second concentration area. Students must maintain a g.p.a. of at least 2.00 in the major. All students must complete the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences General Education Program.

Students may count a maximum of 48 s.h. earned in School of Journalism and Mass Communication courses (prefix JMC) toward the 120 s.h. required for a B.A. or B.S. degree.

Each student works with an assigned faculty advisor or an educational advisor to develop a study plan that meets the major's requirements. Requirements for the major are consistent with the program's accreditation requirements; the school cannot make exceptions.

Students are encouraged, but not required, to use the University's ifolio system to collect and edit their preprofessional work. They will find the portfolio useful as they interact with faculty members in preparation for entering the job market and for presentation in job interviews.

The journalism major (B.A. and B.S.) requires the following course work.

PREMAJOR FOUNDATION

Both of these:

JMC:1100 (019:090) Media Uses and Effects3 s.h.
JMC:1200 (019:091) Media History and Culture3 s.h.
JOURNALISM PROFESSIONAL SKILLS COURSES

Both of these:

JMC:2010 (019:098) Journalistic Reporting and Writing4 s.h.
JMC:2020 (019:088) Introduction to Multimedia Storytelling4 s.h.

Intermediate/advanced reporting and writing—two of these:

JMC:3400 (019:120) Specialized Reporting and Writing4 s.h.
JMC:3405 (019:121) Depth Reporting and Writing4 s.h.
JMC:3410 (019:122) Magazine Reporting and Writing4 s.h.
JMC:3411 (019:123) Radio and Television Storytelling4 s.h.
JMC:3412 (019:124) Strategic Communication Writing4 s.h.
JMC:3415 (019:128) Writing Across Cultures4 s.h.
JMC:3450 (019:125) Freelance Reporting and Writing4 s.h.
JMC:3460 (019:126) Arts and Culture Reporting and Writing4 s.h.
JMC:3470 (019:127) Narrative Journalism4 s.h.
JMC:3490 (019:129) Feature Reporting and Writing4 s.h.
JMC:4100 (019:171) Advanced Reporting and Writing4 s.h.

Workshop—one of these:

JMC:3600 (019:130) Topics in Media Production4 s.h.
JMC:3603 (019:134) TV News Production4 s.h.
JMC:3605 (019:136) Editing the News4 s.h.
JMC:3610 (019:131) Graphic Design4 s.h.
JMC:3615 (019:135) Strategic Communication Campaigns4 s.h.
JMC:3620 (019:138) Applied Digital and Social Media4 s.h.
JMC:3625 (019:137) Planning and Evaluation of Strategic Campaigns4 s.h.
JMC:3630 (019:132) Photo Storytelling: Making Powerful Images4 s.h.
JMC:3633 (019:133) Philanthropy Communication in a Digital World4 s.h.
JMC:4120 (019:178) Iowa Journalist4 s.h.
JMC:4130 (019:175) Advanced Public Relations Writing4 s.h.
JMC:4300 (019:172) Advanced Photo Storytelling4 s.h.
JMC:4310 (019:173) Advanced Media Workshop4 s.h.
JMC:4320 (019:174) Advanced Television News4 s.h.
JMC:4330 (019:176) Visual Storytelling4 s.h.
JMC:4340 (019:177) Convergence Journalism4 s.h.

And:

A third reporting and writing course or a second workshop chosen from courses not taken in the lists above4 s.h.
CONCEPTUAL COURSES

This course:

JMC:3300 (019:140) Media Law and Communication3 s.h.

And one of these:

JMC:3100 (019:157) Fundraising and Philanthropy Communication3 s.h.
JMC:3105 (019:141) Classic and Contemporary Sports Writing3 s.h.
JMC:3110 (019:150) Visual Communication3 s.h.
JMC:3115 (019:151) Solving Communication Problems3 s.h.
JMC:3120 (019:152) History of Mass Communication in the U.S.3 s.h.
JMC:3125 (019:154) Media and Consumers3 s.h.
JMC:3130 (019:156) Comparative Communication Systems3 s.h.
JMC:3135 (019:143) New Media and the Future of Sport3 s.h.
JMC:3140 (019:158) News-Editorial Problems3 s.h.
JMC:3145 (019:159) On the Campaign Trail: Elections and the Media3 s.h.
JMC:3150 (019:160) Media and Health3 s.h.
JMC:3155 (019:161) Law, Media, and Current Issues3 s.h.
JMC:3160 (019:164) Images and Society3 s.h.
JMC:3165 (019:165) African Americans and the Media3 s.h.
JMC:3170 (019:166) Communication Technology and Society3 s.h.
JMC:3175 (019:167) Gender and Mass Media3 s.h.
JMC:3180 (019:168) Journalism Ethics3 s.h.
JMC:3181 (019:145) The Business of Sport Communication3 s.h.
JMC:3185 (019:169) Topics in Mass Communication2-3 s.h.
JMC:3190 (019:144) Classics of Sports Journalism: From Jack London to Grantland3 s.h.
OPTIONAL JOURNALISM ELECTIVES

Students may earn elective credit by completing additional journalism and mass communication course work (prefix JMC), but they may not exceed a maximum of 48 s.h. earned in the School of Journalism and Mass Communication toward the 120 s.h. required for the B.A. or B.S. degree. Credit earned in JMC:2100 (019:099) Journalism Internship counts toward the total journalism and mass communication course work that students may apply to the B.A. or B.S. degree.

SECOND MAJOR OR CONCENTRATION AREA

Every student majoring in journalism and mass communication must complete a second major or a concentration area outside the School of Journalism and Mass Communication. Study in the second major or concentration area enables students to acquire a substantial body of knowledge or expertise in a relevant area, learn how another discipline views the world, and/or develop a companion set of skills to those in journalism and mass communication.

Students who satisfy the requirement by completing a concentration area must choose 24 s.h. of related course work in one or more departments; at least 15 of the 24 s.h. must be earned in advanced courses; in most departments, advanced courses are numbered 3000 or above. Course work in the concentration area must be arranged in consultation with the student's advisor; each student must have the advisor's written endorsement of the second major or concentration area before graduation.

The Certificate in Fundraising and Philanthropy Communication does not satisfy the requirement for a second major or concentration area.

Second Major or Concentration Area for the B.A.

Bachelor of Arts students must complete the requirements for the journalism and mass communication major (36 s.h.) and must satisfy the school's second major or concentration area requirement in one of two ways.

Option 1: complete a B.A. major in another department.

Option 2: complete a 24 s.h. concentration of related courses in one or more departments that offer B.A. degrees; at least 15 s.h. of the required 24 s.h. must be earned in advanced courses.

Second Major or Concentration Area for the B.S.

Bachelor of Science students must complete the requirements for the journalism and mass communication major (36 s.h.) and must satisfy the school's second major or concentration area requirement in one of two ways.

Option 1: complete a B.S. major in a natural, mathematical, or social science.

Option 2: complete a 24 s.h. concentration of related courses in the social sciences (economics, geography, political science, psychology, or sociology) and/or the natural and mathematical sciences, earning at least 15 s.h. of the required 24 s.h. in advanced courses; and complete all the special math, research methods, statistics, computer science, and/or cognate science requirements required for the B.S. in the department in which the majority of concentration area courses are taken.

Four-Year Graduation Plan

The following checkpoints list the minimum requirements students must complete by certain semesters in order to stay on the University's Four-Year Graduation Plan.

Note: Students must be admitted to the journalism and mass communication major by the first semester of their sophomore year in order to be eligible for the Four-Year Graduation Plan. The checkpoints below include the required work in journalism and mass communication plus a second concentration area, but they do not include the requirements of a second major, since the Four-Year Graduation Plan does not apply to second majors.

Before the third semester begins: JMC:1100 (019:090) Media Uses and Effects and/or JMC:1200 (019:091) Media History and Culture

Before the fifth semester begins: JMC:2010 (019:098) Journalistic Reporting and Writing, JMC:2020 (019:088) Introduction to Multimedia Storytelling, one more course in the major, and at least one course in the second major or concentration area

Before the seventh semester begins: two required professional skills courses; one advanced, conceptual, or elective course in the major; three more courses in the second major or concentration area; and at least 90 s.h. earned toward the degree

Before the eighth semester begins: two more required professional skills courses; one advanced, conceptual, or elective course in the major; and two more courses in the second major or concentration area

During the eighth semester: enrollment in all remaining course work in the major (including the second major or concentration area), all remaining General Education courses, and a sufficient number of semester hours to graduate

Honors in the Major

Students majoring in journalism and mass communication have the opportunity to graduate with honors in the major. Students in the school's honors program must have a g.p.a. of at least 3.50 in work for the major. To graduate with honors in the major, they complete JMC:4955 (019:191) Honors Project, earning 3 s.h. of credit in work guided by a faculty member. The honors project may be a thesis or a professional project and typically is completed during the last semester of the senior year. Students are encouraged but not required to take JMC:4950 (019:190) Honors Readings or JMC:4993 (019:193) Honors Workshop to prepare for the project.

Honors students in the school also must be members of the University of Iowa Honors Program, which requires students to maintain a cumulative University of Iowa g.p.a. of at least 3.33 and to fulfill other requirements; visit Honors at Iowa to learn about the University's honors program.

All majors with an overall g.p.a. of at least 3.33 are encouraged to take any journalism and mass communication course for honors credit and to make use of other honors opportunities in the school. Visit Journalism Honors Program on the school's web site or contact the school's honors advisor for details.

Minor

The minor in mass communication requires a minimum of 15 s.h. in mass communication courses, including 12 s.h. earned in courses considered advanced for the minor taken at The University of Iowa. Students must maintain a g.p.a. of at least 2.00 in all courses for the minor and in all UI courses for the minor. Courses for the minor may not be taken pass/nonpass.

Conceptual courses numbered JMC:3100 (019:157) Fundraising and Philanthropy Communication through JMC:3190 (019:144) Classics of Sports Journalism: From Jack London to Grantland, and the course JMC:3300 (019:140) Media Law and Communication are considered advanced for the minor. Students are encouraged to take JMC:1100 (019:090) Media Uses and Effects or JMC:1200 (019:091) Media History and Culture as a lower-level course.

The minor introduces students to the field of mass communication; it does not prepare them for careers in media.

National Honor Society

The school's chapter of Kappa Tau Alpha, the national society honoring scholarship in journalism and mass communication, was founded in 1936 and is named for former director Leslie G. Moeller. Students are considered for membership if their grade-point average places them in the top 10 percent of their class and they have completed at least five semesters of University work, including a minimum of 9 s.h. in journalism and mass communication skills courses. Contact the school's Kappa Tau Alpha advisor for details.

Certificate in Fundraising and Philanthropy Communication

The School of Journalism and Mass Communication administers the undergraduate certificate program in fundraising and philanthropy communication; see Fundraising and Philanthropy Communication in the Catalog.

Graduate Programs of Study

  • Master of Arts in journalism
  • Master of Arts in strategic communication
  • Doctor of Philosophy in mass communications

Master of Arts: Journalism

The Master of Arts program in journalism requires 33 s.h. of graduate credit. Students must complete a creative thesis. The program admits students for fall entry.

The M.A. program in journalism focuses on communication. Its approach is academic and theoretical, balanced with substantial development of professional skills, to prepare students for careers in media education. The program is designed for individuals who hold a bachelor's degree in journalism and/or mass communication and wish to continue their education in the field; for experienced journalists or communicators who wish to prepare to teach by earning an M.A. and then a Ph.D.; and for persons who hold a bachelor's degree in another discipline and would like to enter journalism by earning an M.A.

Students in the M.A. program in journalism who wish to enter the school's Ph.D. program in mass communications must complete all M.A. requirements, including the creative thesis, before they may be considered for admission to the Ph.D. program. Professional course work from the M.A. program cannot be applied to the requirements of the Ph.D. program.

M.A. students gain grounding in concepts, theories, and research methods while they pursue a curriculum that emphasizes technology, innovation and media, creative and collaborative multimedia, design for media, cross-media studies, transformed social interactions, and visual communication. They also hone technical skills in reporting, writing, visual and graphic storytelling, design, and digital imaging.

Students choose courses in consultation with their advisors.

All M.A. students must complete the following course work.

JMC:5240 (019:240) Social Media and Online Communication3 s.h.
JMC:5400 (019:226) Master's Advanced Writing and Editing3 s.h.
JMC:6255 (019:255) Problems in International Communication3 s.h.
JMC:6800 (019:279) Mass Communication Seminar3 s.h.
Courses outside journalism and mass communication6 s.h.

Students who have not taken a recent U.S. media law class must enroll in JMC:3300 (019:140) Media Law and Communication or an alternative media law course approved by the advisor. They must have the instructor's consent.

All students must complete a thesis—an original, in-depth, theory-based work that combines scholarship and creative production. The thesis must be done in an appropriate and reproducible medium. Students may write conventional theses or produce creative, multimedia, and cross-media theses grounded in digital humanistic and social science traditions. Theses may include original scholarly research, creative visual storytelling, visual ethnography, digital animation, digital documentary productions, digital literatures, and so forth.

For a more detailed description of the M.A. program in journalism, contact the School of Journalism and Mass Communication.

Master of Arts: Strategic Communication

The Master of Arts program in strategic communication requires a minimum of 30 s.h. of graduate credit. Courses for the program are offered online. They also are offered on location at the John and Mary Pappajohn Education Center in Des Moines, Iowa, but not on the University's Iowa City campus.

The strategic communication program is designed for professionals in a wide variety of areas, such as corporate and organizational communication, public relations, integrated marketing communication, advertising, political and public affairs communication, health communication, event planning, risk communication, and professional writing. The program focuses on the skills, knowledge, and experience that working professionals need, including the ability to anticipate and meet the challenges of radical change in the media landscape.

The M.A. program offers three specializations: health and medicine, political communication, and public affairs communication. It also permits students to design a specialization that fits their interests and needs.

The curriculum consists of core courses, electives, and a capstone project in place of a thesis. In most courses, students are encouraged to introduce case studies and projects from their workplace.

The M.A. in strategic communication requires the following course work.

CORE COURSES

All of these:

JMC:5300 (019:225) Media Principles, Problems, and Challenges3 s.h.
JMC:5400 (019:226) Master's Advanced Writing and Editing3 s.h.
JMC:6800 (019:279) Mass Communication Seminar3 s.h.

JMC:5300 (019:225) provides a conceptual foundation for strategic communication; JMC:5400 (019:226) sharpens students' professional skills; and JMC:6800 (019:279) focuses on best practices of leadership communication both in and outside of corporations and other organizations.

And one or both of these:

JMC:5237 (019:237) Financial and Budget Fundamentals for Communicators3 s.h.
JMC:5240 (019:240) Social Media and Online Communication3 s.h.

The program recommends that students complete both JMC:5237 (019:237) and JMC:5240 (019:240); students who complete both may count the second course as an elective.

ELECTIVES

Strategic communication students earn 15 s.h. in elective courses, which they choose in consultation with their advisors. Students choose electives from the list below. They also may choose other electives that are appropriate for their individual programs, drawing from courses offered by the School of Journalism and Mass Communication and by other University of Iowa departments and programs.

JMC:5238 (019:238) Strategic Communication Campaigns3 s.h.
JMC:5239 (019:239) Strategic Web Video Communication3 s.h.
JMC:5248 (019:248) Strategic Political Communication3 s.h.
JMC:5266 (019:266) Risk Communication3 s.h.
JMC:5267 (019:267) Strategic Health Care Communication3 s.h.
JMC:5268 (019:268) Strategic Planning for the Communication Professional3 s.h.
JMC:5269 (019:269) Media Management for Strategic Communicators3 s.h.
JMC:5285 (019:285) Strategic Communication Externship3 s.h.
CAPSTONE PROJECT

Strategic communication students complete the following capstone project in place of a thesis.

JMC:5955 (019:299) Masters Researcharr.

For a more detailed description of the M.A. in strategic communication, contact the School of Journalism and Mass Communication.

Doctor of Philosophy

The Doctor of Philosophy program in mass communications requires 80 s.h. of graduate credit. The program admits students for fall entry. It is designed for students who have completed an M.A. thesis.

The program emphasizes interdisciplinary inquiry into media communication phenomena from sociocultural, historical, and social science perspectives. It is defined by the scholarly interests of its faculty, which include ethnographic, scientific, historical, legal, critical, cultural, social, feminist, and international aspects of media communication, both verbal and visual; comparative communication; convergence; new and emerging media; health communication; popular culture; and globalization. Faculty members use qualitative or quantitative methods in their research and teaching.

The program is highly individualized. In consultation with his or her advisor, each student draws on courses offered by the School of Journalism and Mass Communication as well as other academic units to develop a course of study that reflects his or her academic background, experience, professional goals, and intellectual interests.

Students may count up to 30 s.h. of master's degree credit toward the 80 s.h. required for the Ph.D., with the graduate committee's approval, as long as the credit was earned in courses relevant to the Ph.D. study plan. The Graduate College does not accept transfer credit for professional skills courses. Students who have earned professional master's degrees must take additional Ph.D. course work.

The Doctor of Philosophy in mass communications requires the following course work.

JMC:6100 (019:320) Ph.D. Seminar (taken four times)4 s.h.
JMC:6210 (019:231) Social Science Theories in Media and Communication3 s.h.
JMC:6220 (019:232) Critical Cultural Theories in Media and Communication3 s.h.
JMC:6310 (019:235) Quantitative Research Methods for Media and Communication3 s.h.
JMC:6320 (019:236) Qualitative Research Methods for Media and Communication3 s.h.
JMC:6700 (019:265) Approaches to Teaching3 s.h.
JMC:6999 (019:399) Dissertationarr.
Advanced research methods courses3 s.h.
Advanced theory courses3 s.h.
Journalism and mass communication electives6 s.h.
Outside concentration courses9 s.h.
Credit from master's degree and/or additional Ph.D. courses30 s.h.

For a more detailed description of the Ph.D. program, contact the School of Journalism and Mass Communication.

Joint J.D./M.A. and J.D./Ph.D.

The School of Journalism and Mass Communication and the College of Law offer a joint Juris Doctor/Master of Arts in journalism and a joint Juris Doctor/Doctor of Philosophy in mass communications. The joint degree programs allow students to count a limited amount of credit toward both degrees. Separate application to each degree program is required. Applicants must be admitted to both programs before they may be admitted to the joint degree program. Admission for journalism and mass communication graduate programs is for fall entry.

For information about the J.D., see the College of Law section of the Catalog.

Admission

Applicants must meet the admission requirements of the Graduate College; see the Manual of Rules and Regulations of the Graduate College or the Graduate College section of the Catalog.

Facilities and Resources

Adler Journalism and Mass Communication Building

The School of Journalism and Mass Communication moved into the Philip D. Adler Journalism and Mass Communication Building in January 2005. The 65,000-square-foot building has computer laboratories for audio, video, design, writing and web publishing, and a resource center. A photography laboratory is located nearby. The building also is home to offices of the Iowa High School Press Association; the Quill and Scroll Society, an international honor society for high school journalists; the University's award-winning student newspaper, The Daily Iowan; and Daily Iowan TV, a student-run newscast.

Iowa Center for Communication Study

The Iowa Center for Communication Study encourages and facilitates student and faculty research in communication. It also sponsors publications and provides editorial oversight for the Journal of Communication Inquiry.

Financial Support

More than $170,000 in scholarships and awards is disbursed to journalism and mass communication students each year. Scholarship information and applications are available each fall. Visit Scholarships on the School of Journalism and Mass Communication web site or contact the school.

The school offers research and teaching assistantships for graduate students; preference is given to Ph.D. students. Journalism and mass communication students have been successful in winning competitive fellowships open to all graduate students; applicants must be nominated by the graduate committee.

The school has a program of modest financial support for undergraduate and graduate student research projects.

Professional Enrichment

Internships

The school encourages undergraduate majors and Master of Science professional journalism emphasis students to complete at least one internship. The school's internship and assessment coordinator helps students find appropriate positions.

Undergraduate students may earn up to 4 s.h. of internship credit, registering with appropriate faculty sponsorship for JMC:2100 (019:099) Journalism Internship (1-4 s.h.). Internships do not fulfill requirements for the major, but internship credit counts toward the total journalism and mass communication credit that students may apply toward a B.A. or B.S. degree (maximum of 48 s.h.). Students may take internships for no credit through CCP:1019 (409:019) Internship in Journalism.

Students also are encouraged to pursue opportunities for journalism experience on campus through student-operated media, including The Daily Iowan, Daily Iowan TV, and KRUI-FM radio.

Job Placement

The school's internship and assessment coordinator helps students seeking career guidance and employment opportunities. The school compiles and publicizes notices of professional jobs open to JMC students and graduates. It also cooperates with the University's Pomerantz Career Center in providing career guidance and placement services as well as workshops and programs on seeking jobs.

Activities

The school engages in a variety of activities for the enrichment of students, faculty, and the entire campus. Speakers visit campus each year under lectureships funded by the John F. Murray and Leslie G. Moeller Fund, and the M. Holly McGranahan Lecture. In addition, guest speakers are funded through the Hearst Visiting Professionals Program and the Hageboeck Daily Iowan Visiting Professionals Program. Campus organizations for students include Kappa Tau Alpha (KTA, a national society honoring scholarship in journalism), the National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ), the Public Relations Student Society of America (PRSSA), the Society of Professional Journalists (SPJ), and Ed on Campus (EOC).

Courses

Lower-Level Undergraduate

JMC:1000 (019:029) First-Year Seminar1-2 s.h.
Small discussion class taught by a faculty member; topics chosen by instructor; may include outside activities (e.g., films, lectures, performances, readings, visits to research facilities). Requirements: first‑ or second‑semester standing.
 
JMC:1100 (019:090) Media Uses and Effects3 s.h.
Introduction to mass communication theory as it relates to practical applications in the media industry and American society. GE: Social Sciences.
 
JMC:1200 (019:091) Media History and Culture3 s.h.
Historical development of journalism in the United States; cultural, historical content. GE: Historical Perspectives.
 
JMC:1500 (019:050) Social Media Today3 s.h.
Prehistory of social media and identification of ideas, events, and elements in ancient and historical times; earliest days of online posting and interacting; first instances of social engagement on the Web; how social media (journalism, politics, health care, romance and lifestyle, entertainment, war and terrorism, professions and jobs) affects individual areas of life, culture, and society; what's next and how social media changes lives in the future and affects the fate of humanity. GE: Values, Society, and Diversity.
 
JMC:2010 (019:098) Journalistic Reporting and Writing4 s.h.
Fundamental skills of journalistic reporting and writing. Prerequisites: JMC:1100 (019:090) and JMC:1200 (019:091). Corequisites: JMC:2020 (019:088). Requirements: journalism major.
 
JMC:2020 (019:088) Introduction to Multimedia Storytelling4 s.h.
Fundamental skills of multimedia storytelling, including visual and digital. Prerequisites: JMC:1100 (019:090) and JMC:1200 (019:091). Corequisites: JMC:2010 (019:098). Requirements: journalism major.
 
JMC:2100 (019:099) Journalism Internship1-3 s.h.
Faculty‑supervised professional work experience in journalism and mass communication. Prerequisites: JMC:2010 (019:098) and JMC:2020 (019:088). Requirements: journalism major.
 
JMC:2200 (019:096) Communication and Public Relations3 s.h.
Theory and practice of public relations; cultural, social, organizational roles of public relations, opportunities, problems, and solutions. Requirements: journalism major.
 

Upper-Level Undergraduate and Graduate

JMC:3100 (019:157) Fundraising and Philanthropy Communication3 s.h.
Practical experience planning and writing fundraising materials; how yearly fundraising helps approximately 1.5 million nonprofit organizations receive more than $3 billion from individuals, foundations, and corporations to help people in need, advocate for causes, support research/arts/culture, and enhance opportunities for public and/or their members. Same as FPC:3185 (217:169).
 
JMC:3105 (019:141) Classic and Contemporary Sports Writing3 s.h.
Critical reading of sports reportage, including historical and current examples; social and cultural preoccupations and problems viewed through the prism of sports journalism.
 
JMC:3110 (019:150) Visual Communication3 s.h.
History of modern visual communication from a cultural perspective; visual form, composition, spatial representation, color and other topics; in‑depth study of selected artists, designers, photographers.
 
JMC:3115 (019:151) Solving Communication Problems3 s.h.
Fundamentals of scientific inquiry in the study of communication and mass communication behavior; language, concepts, procedures, application of behavioral research methods; field and experimental approaches.
 
JMC:3120 (019:152) History of Mass Communication in the U.S.3 s.h.
Historical analysis of professional practices. Prerequisites: JMC:1200 (019:091).
 
JMC:3125 (019:154) Media and Consumers3 s.h.
Communications media in historical, political, economic contexts and their relationships with audiences; criteria for evaluating media content in relation to nature and consequences of news, entertainment, advertising.
 
JMC:3130 (019:156) Comparative Communication Systems3 s.h.
Culture and communication as central to examining media in different social and political settings; emphasis on contemporary problems.
 
JMC:3135 (019:143) New Media and the Future of Sport3 s.h.
Emergence and significance of Internet blogs, social media, convergence journalism, video games, and fantasy sports; economic, regulatory, and cultural forces that shape new media sport journalism and entertainment. Same as SPST:3198 (028:187), AMST:3198 (045:187).
 
JMC:3140 (019:158) News-Editorial Problems3 s.h.
Current issues in journalism, editing strategies; emphasis on press performance and practical problems journalists confront in their work.
 
JMC:3145 (019:159) On the Campaign Trail: Elections and the Media3 s.h.
Relationship between political campaigns and mass media; critical evaluation of nature, role, function of media political coverage.
 
JMC:3146 (019:146) Arab Spring in Context: Media, Religion, and Geopolitics3 s.h.
Protest movements that started in Tunisia in 2011 and swept across North Africa and the Middle East transforming Arab and Islamic societies in radically different ways; function of social media, satellite television, communication technology; influence of religious leaders and groups on some protest outcomes; impact of wealth and geopolitics on social fabric of Islamic societies within and outside Arab countries. Requirements: for COMM:3834 (036:129) — g.p.a. of at least 2.50, completion of Foundations of Communication requirement, and 6 s.h. of intermediate‑level course work. Same as RELS:3834 (032:134), IS:3834 (187:126), WLLC:3834 (218:165), COMM:3834 (036:129).
 
JMC:3150 (019:160) Media and Health3 s.h.
Potential and limits of mass media's ability to educate the public about health; research and theory on the influence of information and entertainment media; theories, models, assumptions of mass communication in relation to public health issues. Same as CBH:3150 (172:140), GHS:3150 (152:159).
 
JMC:3155 (019:161) Law, Media, and Current Issues3 s.h.
Current topics in communication law.
 
JMC:3160 (019:164) Images and Society3 s.h.
Development and uses of photography, film, and television as technologies of reproduction in contemporary culture.
 
JMC:3165 (019:165) African Americans and the Media3 s.h.
GE: Values, Society, and Diversity. Same as AFAM:3925 (129:122).
 
JMC:3170 (019:166) Communication Technology and Society3 s.h.
Implications and effects of computer‑based forms of communication, especially the Internet, for journalists, the media audience, and society at large.
 
JMC:3175 (019:167) Gender and Mass Media3 s.h.
Media images and representations of the body in terms of gender; impact on people, society; media and body image, sexuality, gender roles, gender and power, race, ethnicity, class, age; critical analysis of mediated images.
 
JMC:3180 (019:168) Journalism Ethics3 s.h.
Application of ethical principles in journalistic decision making; consideration of potentially conflicting values, loyalties, and goals that force professional journalists to make difficult choices.
 
JMC:3181 (019:145) The Business of Sport Communication3 s.h.
Critical and practical approach to understanding contemporary sports media and business practices that mark it; focus on sports media industries and institutions; branding, marketing, demographic, public relations, and promotional factors that shape content. Same as SPST:3181 (028:123).
 
JMC:3185 (019:169) Topics in Mass Communication2-3 s.h.
Focus on particular area, issue, approach, or body of knowledge; may include international media, media criticism, new technologies, history of documentary photography, literary journalism, media management.
 
JMC:3190 (019:144) Classics of Sports Journalism: From Jack London to Grantland3 s.h.
Historical examples of celebrated works of sports journalism; focus on long‑form texts. Same as SPST:3180 (028:183).
 
JMC:3210 (019:102) Workshop for Secondary School Journalism/Communication Teachers1-3 s.h.
Workshops on journalism/mass media curriculum, audio/video production, photojournalism, publication design, journalistic writing techniques, advising student publications. Same as EDTL:3026 (07S:130).
 
JMC:3300 (019:140) Media Law and Communication3 s.h.
Issues affecting the media: freedom of expression, libel, privacy, access to information, protection of news sources, free press/fair trial, copyright, government regulation of broadcasting. Requirements: junior standing.
 
JMC:3400 (019:120) Specialized Reporting and Writing4 s.h.
Topics may include public affairs, law, science, business, medicine, intercultural affairs, education, computer‑assisted reporting. Prerequisites: JMC:2010 (019:098) and JMC:2020 (019:088). Requirements: journalism major.
 
JMC:3405 (019:121) Depth Reporting and Writing4 s.h.
Enterprise reporting; emphasis on reporter as researcher, organizer, writer of complex stories in a variety of contexts. Prerequisites: JMC:2010 (019:098) and JMC:2020 (019:088). Requirements: journalism major.
 
JMC:3410 (019:122) Magazine Reporting and Writing4 s.h.
Finding ideas, researching, interviewing; problems of organization and style; identification of audiences and markets; development of writing skills. Prerequisites: JMC:2010 (019:098) and JMC:2020 (019:088). Requirements: journalism major.
 
JMC:3411 (019:123) Radio and Television Storytelling4 s.h.
Principles; gathering, writing, editing, reporting the news; techniques and concepts as a foundation for understanding, successfully writing, and delivering broadcast news. Prerequisites: JMC:2010 (019:098) and JMC:2020 (019:088). Corequisites: JMC:3603 (019:134). Requirements: journalism major.
 
JMC:3412 (019:124) Strategic Communication Writing4 s.h.
Principles and practices of persuasive writing; focus on public relations; may include editorials, op‑ed pieces, magazine essays, reviews. Prerequisites: JMC:2010 (019:098) and JMC:2020 (019:088). Requirements: journalism major.
 
JMC:3415 (019:128) Writing Across Cultures4 s.h.
Forms of travel writing and other types of crosscultural reporting; skills, knowledge, understandings vital to writing well about an increasingly multicultural and diverse world. Prerequisites: JMC:2010 (019:098) and JMC:2020 (019:088). Requirements: journalism major.
 
JMC:3450 (019:125) Freelance Reporting and Writing4 s.h.
Approaches to writing and marketing articles to magazines, newspapers, other publications; developing ideas, researching periodical markets, writing queries, writing and rewriting articles for publication. Prerequisites: JMC:2010 (019:098) and JMC:2020 (019:088). Requirements: journalism major. Same as CNW:3450 (08N:125).
 
JMC:3460 (019:126) Arts and Culture Reporting and Writing4 s.h.
Writing about arts and culture in a range of formats (e.g., news, profiles, features, criticism, essays); emphasis on original reporting that draws on resources, issues, people, and events on campus and in the community, especially in visual and performing arts. Prerequisites: JMC:2010 (019:098) and JMC:2020 (019:088). Requirements: journalism major.
 
JMC:3470 (019:127) Narrative Journalism4 s.h.
Process of writing the true story; development of skills in researching, interviewing, information gathering, organization, story‑telling techniques, writing final story; story publication in magazines, newspapers, journals, online. Prerequisites: JMC:2010 (019:098) and JMC:2020 (019:088). Requirements: journalism major.
 
JMC:3490 (019:129) Feature Reporting and Writing4 s.h.
Storytelling techniques for magazine, newspaper, web site features; stylistic flair; human elements in stories; research, interviewing, and reporting. Prerequisites: JMC:2010 (019:098) and JMC:2020 (019:088). Requirements: journalism major.
 
JMC:3600 (019:130) Topics in Media Production4 s.h.
Analysis and solution of problems with communication strategies and/or media products; public relations, newsletter production, radio, media research, web basics, global media, interviewing, PR fund‑raising. Prerequisites: JMC:2010 (019:098) and JMC:2020 (019:088). Requirements: journalism major.
 
JMC:3603 (019:134) TV News Production4 s.h.
Electronic news gathering (ENG); conceptualization, shooting, editing basic news packages. Prerequisites: JMC:2010 (019:098) and JMC:2020 (019:088). Corequisites: JMC:3411 (019:123). Requirements: journalism major.
 
JMC:3605 (019:136) Editing the News4 s.h.
Principles and process of editing content for publication; micro‑ and macroediting, headline writing, other aspects of editing. Prerequisites: JMC:2010 (019:098) and JMC:2020 (019:088). Requirements: journalism major.
 
JMC:3610 (019:131) Graphic Design4 s.h.
Problems of design, layout and production; practical and aesthetic considerations; digital techniques; creative projects. Prerequisites: JMC:2010 (019:098) and JMC:2020 (019:088). Requirements: journalism major.
 
JMC:3615 (019:135) Strategic Communication Campaigns4 s.h.
Development and presentation of public relations campaigns for client organizations; communication theory and research techniques applied to analyzing and solving public relations problems through objective‑based strategic planning. Prerequisites: JMC:2010 (019:098) and JMC:2020 (019:088). Requirements: journalism major.
 
JMC:3620 (019:138) Applied Digital and Social Media4 s.h.
Creation of original journalistic web sites incorporating writing, design, and structure; contemporary online media issues. Prerequisites: JMC:2010 (019:098) and JMC:2020 (019:088). Requirements: journalism major.
 
JMC:3625 (019:137) Planning and Evaluation of Strategic Campaigns4 s.h.
Undergraduate‑level research methods used specifically for public relations and advertising; basic quantitative and qualitative methods as related to strategic communication; hands‑on exercises. Prerequisites: JMC:2010 (019:098) and JMC:2020 (019:088). Requirements: journalism major.
 
JMC:3630 (019:132) Photo Storytelling: Making Powerful Images4 s.h.
Techniques; basic craft, location shooting, editing photographs; group critiques of assignments. Prerequisites: JMC:2010 (019:098) and JMC:2020 (019:088).
 
JMC:3633 (019:133) Philanthropy Communication in a Digital World4 s.h.
World of philanthropy and nonprofit work that changes rapidly with and in response to developments in digital communications; campaigns and fundraisers driven by free agents on social networking sites as an example of how philanthropists and nonprofit workers operate in digital environment; overview of trends in areas of philanthropy and nonprofit work; practical skills to help communicate, create, and disseminate messages using multiple digital tools and social media; analysis of communication/media strategies; media production. Same as FPC:3633 (217:133).
 
JMC:4100 (019:171) Advanced Reporting and Writing4 s.h.
Project journalism; extended magazine pieces, explanatory/investigative journalism, series for newspapers, or task‑force projects by entire class on a major issue, with goal of publication. Prerequisites: JMC:2010 (019:098) and JMC:2020 (019:088). Requirements: journalism major and one course from JMC:3400 (019:120) through JMC:3490 (019:129).
 
JMC:4120 (019:178) Iowa Journalist4 s.h.
Experience in photojournalism and desktop publishing software consistent with real‑world media and public relations objectives; students write, edit, design, and produce Iowa Journalist magazine. Requirements: journalism major and one course from JMC:3400 (019:120) through JMC:3620 (019:138).
 
JMC:4130 (019:175) Advanced Public Relations Writing4 s.h.
Case‑based study of corporate public relations practice; globalization issues, branding and integrated communication, crisis management. Prerequisites: JMC:3412 (019:124). Requirements: journalism major.
 
JMC:4300 (019:172) Advanced Photo Storytelling4 s.h.
Photojournalism skills; may include documentary photography, advanced photojournalism methods and techniques. Prerequisites: JMC:3630 (019:132).
 
JMC:4310 (019:173) Advanced Media Workshop4 s.h.
Journalism and mass communication skills; may include editing, broadcasting, design, multimedia. Prerequisites: JMC:2010 (019:098) and JMC:2020 (019:088). Requirements: journalism major and one course from JMC:3400 (019:120) through JMC:3620 (019:138).
 
JMC:4320 (019:174) Advanced Television News4 s.h.
Advanced training and experience in producing, writing, and reporting television news packages and newscasts; emphasis on meeting professional standards. Prerequisites: JMC:3411 (019:123) and JMC:3603 (019:134). Requirements: journalism major.
 
JMC:4330 (019:176) Visual Storytelling4 s.h.
Experience with journalistic storytelling techniques, generating story ideas, researching, writing, producing, editing, and critiquing documentary features and other visual narratives; use of digital video and archival material to produce visual narrative pieces for broadcast and other media platforms. Prerequisites: JMC:3411 (019:123) and JMC:3603 (019:134). Requirements: journalism major.
 
JMC:4340 (019:177) Convergence Journalism4 s.h.
Use of multiple technologies for journalistic storytelling across media platforms, such as print, television, and Internet. Prerequisites: JMC:3620 (019:138). Requirements: journalism major.
 
JMC:4900 (019:180) Special Projects in Mass Communicationarr.
Research and readings to fit needs, interests of students.
 
JMC:4910 (019:181) Readings in Communication and Mass Communication1-3 s.h.
Focus on a problem or issue.
 
JMC:4950 (019:190) Honors Readings1-3 s.h.
Topic in journalism or mass communication, chosen by student. Requirements: honors standing.
 
JMC:4955 (019:191) Honors Project3 s.h.
Independent research or project for honors students. Requirements: honors standing.
 
JMC:4993 (019:193) Honors Workshop3 s.h.
Preparation for honors project; coordination of student's individual thesis work, introduction to issues in research design, methods. Requirements: honors standing.
 

Graduate

JMC:5100 (019:220) Masters Seminar1 s.h.
Theoretical or methodological problems in mass communication.
 
JMC:5237 (019:237) Financial and Budget Fundamentals for Communicators3 s.h.
How a company operates as a business; rapid changes in international economy; important SEC documents and other sources of information on public companies; a public company's financial statements; comparison of public companies financial conditions; analysis and informed conclusions about a public company's financial condition.
 
JMC:5238 (019:238) Strategic Communication Campaigns3 s.h.
Practice of strategic communication through traditional and new media for purpose of benefiting nonprofit organizations or bringing about social change; examples and strategies from corporate, nonprofit, and social marketing campaigns; application of knowledge for benefit of real‑world clients; principles and strategies applied to professional projects.
 
JMC:5239 (019:239) Strategic Web Video Communication3 s.h.
Production of video content and releasing visual stories online; tools needed to capture compelling images and edit meaningful stories; strengths and weaknesses of video storytelling using portable video cameras and affordable editing software; for graduate students who are working professionals.
 
JMC:5240 (019:240) Social Media and Online Communication3 s.h.
Exploration of information industry growth; creative processes involved in developing a blog and utilizing multimedia tools to enhance strategic messages; focus on characteristics and spread of new communication technologies and their social, economic, and political effects.
 
JMC:5248 (019:248) Strategic Political Communication3 s.h.
Study of political communication; topics range from classic issues (agenda setting) to current debates and emerging topics associated with new media; readings address political communication in the United States.
 
JMC:5266 (019:266) Risk Communication3 s.h.
Examination of risk as a central concept in communication process; risk as intrinsically an interdisciplinary concept; literature from a wide range of disciplines and perspectives (communication, psychology, sociology, formal risk analysis); case studies drawn from issues and cultural contexts (environmental, technological or health risks, food safety risks; international military crisis or threats of terrorism, natural disasters); emphasis on comparison of European and American contexts.
 
JMC:5267 (019:267) Strategic Health Care Communication3 s.h.
Breaking down health care to basics; writing and communicating about health care in an understandable way so that hospitals, medical groups, and health care businesses can be better understood when doing business with each other as well as the public and consumers at large; health care writing and communication so consumers can understand, avoid injuries and even death from medical errors shown by studies on health literacy; how doctors and insurance companies can convey their messages in easy‑to‑understand way to lessen public frustration with the system.
 
JMC:5268 (019:268) Strategic Planning for the Communication Professional3 s.h.
Use of a 10 step strategic planning model to discuss ways that an effective strategic planning process can be developed to effectively respond to a changing environment; strategic planning for an organization, department, specific project, and personal growth; ways that strategic thinking can help develop strategic thinking skills that transfer to any part of a career.
 
JMC:5269 (019:269) Media Management for Strategic Communicators3 s.h.
Looking at media in a completely new way; focus on economics and management of competitive businesses; how modern‑day businesses in the media sector succeed or fail and why; decision making, competition, and outcomes; emphasis on news media companies that operate in public glare and offer rich opportunities for critical observation.
 
JMC:5285 (019:285) Strategic Communication Externship3 s.h.
Externship to allow connection between academic program and professional world; enhancement of skill and knowledge.
 
JMC:5300 (019:225) Media Principles, Problems, and Challenges3 s.h.
Current issues in journalism and mass communication in the United States and the world.
 
JMC:5400 (019:226) Master's Advanced Writing and Editing3 s.h.
Writing workshop for M.A. strategic communication students.
 
JMC:5910 (019:280) Masters Tutorialarr.
Topics in communication and mass communication inquiry.
 
JMC:5920 (019:281) Masters Practicumarr.
Research, readings, projects to fit needs, interests of students.
 
JMC:5950 (019:298) Capstone Project in Strategic Communication3 s.h.
Workshop of capstone projects required for graduation; for students nearing completion of M.A. in strategic communication. Requirements: M.A. in strategic communication program enrollment.
 
JMC:5955 (019:299) Masters Researcharr.
Independent research for projects, theses.
 
JMC:6100 (019:320) Ph.D. Seminar1 s.h.
Forum on theoretical or methodological problems in mass communication.
 
JMC:6210 (019:231) Social Science Theories in Media and Communication3 s.h.
Introduction to social science theory used by communication scholars to study media and communication; use of theory to explain media and communication phenomena.
 
JMC:6220 (019:232) Critical Cultural Theories in Media and Communication3 s.h.
Continuation of JMC:6210 (019:231); introduction to critical cultural theories; use of theories to explain media and communication phenomena.
 
JMC:6254 (019:254) Communication and Change3 s.h.
Diverse perspectives on changing communication forms and their implications for media and society; theoretical and methodological approaches to research involving innovation.
 
JMC:6255 (019:255) Problems in International Communication3 s.h.
Representative topics: communication systems in national development and globalization; international and cross‑cultural communication structure and theory; human rights; images, values; mass persuasion; laws, agreements; information channels, content, flow, effects; censorship, language, literacy.
 
JMC:6256 (019:256) Gender and Mass Communication3 s.h.
Approaches to the study of gender and communication; topics vary. Same as GWSS:6256 (131:257).
 
JMC:6310 (019:235) Quantitative Research Methods for Media and Communication3 s.h.
Journalism and media communication research methods that involve collection and analysis of quantifiable data; surveys, content analyses, and experiments.
 
JMC:6320 (019:236) Qualitative Research Methods for Media and Communication3 s.h.
Interpretive research methods in journalism and communication studies that involve field observation, interviews, and textual analysis; use of contemporary, historical, and legal resources; ethical and philosophical positions underlying use of these methods.
 
JMC:6330 (019:330) Reading Group1-3 s.h.
Analysis and discussion of important texts.
 
JMC:6333 (019:333) Seminar in Media Communication3 s.h.
Topics vary.
 
JMC:6340 (019:310) The Internet, Human Rights, and Freedom of Expression3 s.h.
Origins of international human rights regime from a comparative and collective memory perspective; major human rights and freedom of expression controversies from a comparative and international perspective.
 
JMC:6700 (019:265) Approaches to Teaching3 s.h.
Institutional and disciplinary issues that influence the journalism/mass communication classroom, philosophies of teaching, and use of teaching strategies, techniques, and classroom technologies; for students planning to work in academia.
 
JMC:6776 (019:276) Visual Narratives Techniques3 s.h.
Analyses of theories, aesthetics, and methodologies of visual narratives in media storytelling; narrative techniques employed in different media from broadcast television documentaries and news features to narrative storytelling in cyberspace; conceptual survey of visual narratives; hands‑on research, writing, production, and editing of narrative video content for broadcast television and online platforms; production of a high‑quality visual narrative project.
 
JMC:6800 (019:279) Mass Communication Seminar2-3 s.h.
Readings, research.
 
JMC:6910 (019:380) Ph.D. Tutorialarr.
Communication and mass communication inquiry.
 
JMC:6920 (019:381) Ph.D. Research Practicumarr.
Conceptualization and execution of research projects.
 
JMC:6999 (019:399) Dissertationarr.