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This is a draft edition of the 2014-15 Catalog; the final edition will be published in late summer 2014.

Health and Human Physiology

Chair

  • Kevin C. Kregel

Faculty

Professors

  • Warren G. Darling (Health and Human Physiology/Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science), Benjamin K. Hunnicutt, Kathleen F. Janz (Health and Human Physiology/Epidemiology), Kevin C. Kregel (Health and Human Physiology/Radiation Oncology), Kenneth E. Mobily, John Ringen, Michael L. Teague

Associate professors

  • Kelly J. Cole (Health and Human Physiology/Physical Therapy and Rehabilitation Science), Harald M. Stauss (Health and Human Physiology/Internal Medicine)

Assistant professors

  • Lucas Carr, Vitor A. Lira, Gary L. Pierce

Lecturers

  • Chih-Chia Chen, Ray F. Fagenbaum, John E. Farland, Shawn W. Flanagan, Amy Fletcher, Danny T. Foster, Christina R. Johnson, Daniel R. Matheson, Katherine R. Mellen, Emily N.R. Mozena, Clayton R. Peterson, Jennifer Rogers, Christopher E. Schwartz, Brianne L. Swope, Kathy B. Walter

Adjunct professors

  • John P. Albright (Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation), Annunziato Amendola (Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation), Joseph A. Buckwalter (Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation), Alan K. Johnson (Psychology)

Adjunct assistant professor

  • Maureen F. McCue

Adjunct instructors

  • Ned C. Ashton, Emily Baxter, Christine P. Brus, Angela L. Charsha-Harney, Joseph C. Cilek, Thomas K. Dean, Matthew Doyle, Acie Earl, Marcie A. Evans, Johnnie James, Patricia M. Kutcher, Wilene E. Larpenteur, Erin L. Litton, Michael E. Moran, Sherri L. Proud, Caleb Recker, Jennie L. Sertterh, Michael A. Shaffer, Melanie A. Vick, Tanya J. Villhauer, Trisha L. Welter

Adjunct lecturers

  • Landon C. Evans, Kate Klefstad, Marc A. Pizzimenti

Professors emeriti

  • Richard D. MacNeil, Gina C. Schatteman
Undergraduate majors: health and human physiology (B.A.); human physiology (B.S.); athletic training (B.S.); sport and recreation management (B.S.); therapeutic recreation (B.S.)
Undergraduate minors: human physiology; physical activity and nutrition science
Graduate degrees: M.A. in leisure studies; M.S. in health and human physiology; Ph.D. in health and human physiology
Web site: http://clas.uiowa.edu/hhp/

The Department of Health and Human Physiology offers undergraduate majors and minors and graduate degree programs in health and human physiology and related areas. In addition, the department is home to the Health and Physical Activity Skills Program, which offers courses that provide instruction and practice in lifetime sports, fitness training, and wellness activities aimed at enhancing physical health and well-being. Undergraduates in all majors may use several health and human physiology courses to fulfill requirements of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences General Education Program. The department's First-Year Seminar is designed for entering undergraduate students.

Undergraduate Programs of Study

  • Major in health and human physiology (Bachelor of Arts)
  • Major in human physiology (Bachelor of Science)
  • Major in athletic training (Bachelor of Science)
  • Major in sport and recreation management (Bachelor of Science)
  • Major in therapeutic recreation (Bachelor of Science)
  • Minor in human physiology
  • Minor in physical activity and nutrition science

Students may complete a major in health and human physiology (B.A.) or a major in human physiology (B.S.), but not both.

Students majoring in health and human physiology (B.A.) or human physiology (B.S.) or athletic training (B.S.) may not earn the minor in human physiology or the minor in physical activity and nutrition science.

Bachelor of Arts: Health and Human Physiology

The Bachelor of Arts with a major in health and human physiology requires a minimum of 120 s.h., including work for the major, which varies by track. The health promotion track requires a total of 49-51 s.h. of work for the major; the health studies track requires 40-42 s.h. of work for the major; and the exercise science track requires 51-53 s.h. of work for the major. Students must maintain a g.p.a. of at least 2.00 in all courses for the major and in all UI courses for the major. They also must complete the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences General Education Program.

The health promotion track is intended for students seeking careers that promote wellness in the community and the workplace. The health studies track is designed for students who want a more flexible health science curriculum. The exercise science track is intended for students seeking careers as professionals in fitness and in strength and conditioning.

Admission to the health promotion track is selective; students must apply and be admitted. Applicants must have completed the three courses listed under "Science and Math Foundation" below (chemistry, biology, and mathematics or statistics) and must have a University of Iowa and a cumulative g.p.a. of at least 2.70. Students may apply during the semester in which they will complete the science and math foundation courses required for application to the track. Application deadlines are October 1 for the following spring semester, March 1 for the following fall semester.

Admission to the health studies track and the exercise science track is open; students may enter either track without applying to it.

Students majoring in health and human physiology (B.A.) may not earn a second degree in human physiology (B.S.).

Students in all tracks are required to complete a set of common requirements as well as additional courses required specifically for their track.

The major in health and human physiology requires the following course work.

Common Requirements

Each track requires the following science and math foundation (minimum of 10 s.h.) and the departmental core (15 s.h.).

SCIENCE AND MATH FOUNDATION

All students complete three foundation courses (minimum of 10 s.h.): one each in chemistry, biology, and mathematics or statistics.

Chemistry—one of these:

CHEM:1080 (004:008) General Chemistry II3 s.h.
CHEM:1120 (004:012) Principles of Chemistry II4 s.h.

Biology—one of these:

BIOL:1140 (002:021) Human Biology4 s.h.
BIOL:1141 (002:002) Introductory Animal Biology4 s.h.
BIOL:1411 (002:031) Foundations of Biology4 s.h.

Mathematics or statistics—one of these:

MATH:1020 (22M:009) Elementary Functions4 s.h.
MATH:1380 (22M:017) Calculus and Matrix Algebra for Business4 s.h.
MATH:1440 (22M:015) Mathematics for the Biological Sciences4 s.h.
MATH:1460 (22M:016) Calculus for the Biological Sciences4 s.h.
MATH:1850 (22M:025) Calculus I4 s.h.
PSQF:4143 (07P:143)/STAT:4143 (22S:102) Introduction to Statistical Methods3 s.h.
STAT:1020 (22S:025) Elementary Statistics and Inference3 s.h.
STAT:1030 (22S:008) Statistics for Business4 s.h.
STAT:3510 (22S:101) Biostatistics3 s.h.
DEPARTMENTAL CORE

All students must complete the five-course departmental core (15 s.h.).

All of these:

HHP:1100 (027:053) Human Anatomy3 s.h.
HHP:1300 (027:050) Fundamentals of Human Physiology3 s.h.
HHP:2200 (027:039) Physical Activity and Health3 s.h.
HHP:2310 (027:040) Nutrition and Health3 s.h.
HHP:3400 (027:140) Applied Exercise Physiology3 s.h.

Health Promotion Track Requirements

Health promotion track students also complete the following health promotion core courses (15 s.h.) and guided electives (9 s.h.) in addition to the courses listed under "Common Requirements" above (math and science foundation and departmental core).

HEALTH PROMOTION: CORE

All of these:

HHP:3200 (027:136) Health Behavior and Health Promotion3 s.h.
HHP:3430 (027:137) Community and Worksite Health Promotion3 s.h.
HHP:4200 (027:138) Metabolic Exercise Testing and Prescription3 s.h.
HHP:4320 (027:134) Nutrition Interventions3 s.h.
HHP:4420 (027:156) Planning and Evaluating Health Interventions3 s.h.
HEALTH PROMOTION: GUIDED ELECTIVES

Students must complete at least 9 s.h. selected from the courses below, including at least 6 s.h. in courses numbered 3000 or above.

HHP:2130 (027:044) Human Development Through the Life Span3 s.h.
HHP:3050 (027:128) Obesity: Causes, Consequences, Prevention, and Treatment3 s.h.
HHP:3100 (027:110) Health Literacy3 s.h.
HHP:3420 (027:144) College Health Education3 s.h.
HHP:3440 (027:147) Physical Activity and Healthy Communities3 s.h.
HHP:3850 (027:176) Promoting Health Globally3 s.h.
HHP:4210 (027:139) Musculoskeletal Exercise Testing and Prescription3 s.h.
HHP:4390 (027:151) Understanding Human Disease3 s.h.
HHP:4400 (027:152) Health Promotion Clinical Practicum (may be taken twice)1 s.h.
HHP:4405 (027:153) Health Promotion Community and Worksite Practicum (may be taken twice)1 s.h.
HHP:4440 (027:143) Physiology of Nutrition3 s.h.
HHP:4500 (027:195) Undergraduate Independent Studyarr.
HHP:4940 (027:187) Health Promotion Honors Readings1-2 s.h.
HHP:4950 (027:188) Health Promotion Honors Problems3-4 s.h.
ACCT:2100 (06A:001) Introduction to Financial Accounting3 s.h.
ASP:1800 (153:085) Basic Aspects of Aging3 s.h.
JMC:3150 (019:160) Media and Health3 s.h.
RCE:4175 (07C:175) Motivational Interviewing3 s.h.
RCE:4185 (07C:185) Introduction to Substance Abuse3 s.h.

Health Studies Track Requirements

In addition to completing the courses listed under "Common Requirements" above (math and science foundation and departmental core), health studies track students must earn at least 15 s.h. in courses chosen from the list below, including 12 s.h. in courses numbered 3000 or above.

HHP:1110 (027:054) Human Anatomy Laboratory1 s.h.
HHP:1310 (027:051) Human Physiology Laboratory1 s.h.
HHP:2130 (027:044) Human Development Through the Life Span3 s.h.
HHP:2500 (027:076) Psychological Aspects of Sport and Physical Activity3 s.h.
HHP:3000 (027:120) Equity Issues in the Health Sciences3 s.h.
HHP:3030 (027:131) Coaching for Health and Wellness3 s.h.
HHP:3050 (027:128) Obesity: Causes, Consequences, Prevention, and Treatment3 s.h.
HHP:3300 (027:117) Human Growth and Motor Development3 s.h.
HHP:3440 (027:147) Physical Activity and Healthy Communities3 s.h.
HHP:3655 (027:175) Emotional and Psychological Aspects of Health3 s.h.
HHP:4220 (027:197) Biomechanics of Human Motion3 s.h.
HHP:4230 (027:158) Motor Learning: Theory and Application3 s.h.
HHP:4390 (027:151) Understanding Human Disease3 s.h.
HHP:4440 (027:143) Physiology of Nutrition3 s.h.
HHP:4500 (027:195) Undergraduate Independent Studyarr.

Exercise Science Track Requirements

Exercise science track students complete the following exercise science core courses (18 s.h.) and guided electives (8 s.h.) in addition to the courses listed under "Common Requirements" above (the math and science foundation and the departmental core).

EXERCISE SCIENCE: CORE

All of these:

HHP:2350 (027:095) Biomechanics of Sport and Physical Activity3 s.h.
HHP:2500 (027:076) Psychological Aspects of Sport and Physical Activity3 s.h.
HHP:4200 (027:138) Metabolic Exercise Testing and Prescription3 s.h.
HHP:4210 (027:139) Musculoskeletal Exercise Testing and Prescription3 s.h.
HHP:4310 (027:133) Sport and Exercise Nutrition3 s.h.
HHP:4390 (027:151) Understanding Human Disease3 s.h.
EXERCISE SCIENCE: GUIDED ELECTIVES

Students must complete at least 8 s.h. from the courses below, including at least 6 s.h. in courses numbered 3000 or above.

ATEP:2030 (027:057) Basic Athletic Training3 s.h.
HHP:1110 (027:054) Human Anatomy Laboratory1 s.h.
HHP:1310 (027:051) Human Physiology Laboratory1 s.h.
HHP:2210 (027:030) Principles of Exercise Leadership3 s.h.
HHP:3030 (027:131) Coaching for Health and Wellness3 s.h.
HHP:3050 (027:128) Obesity: Causes, Consequences, Prevention, and Treatment3 s.h.
HHP:3300 (027:117) Human Growth and Motor Development3 s.h.
HHP:3650 (027:174) Advanced Sport and Exercise Psychology3 s.h.
HHP:3860 (027:170) Leadership Theory for Health and Fitness3 s.h.
HHP:4150 (027:150) Clinical Exercise Physiology3 s.h.
HHP:4190 (027:159) Scientific Basis of Training for Elite Performance3 s.h.
HHP:4230 (027:158) Motor Learning: Theory and Application3 s.h.
HHP:4350 (027:163) Practicum in Personal Training2 s.h.
HHP:4360 (027:164) Practicum in Group Fitness Instruction2 s.h.
HHP:4370 (027:166) Practicum in Strength and Conditioning2 s.h.
LEIS:3148 (169:148) Introduction to Personal Training3 s.h.
LEIS:3151 (169:151) Liability in Recreation and Sport3 s.h.
SPST:2081 (028:180) Theory and Ethics of Coaching3 s.h.

The department recommends that exercise science students also complete the following two courses.

ATEP:1000 (027:056) First Aid and CPR2 s.h.
PSY:1001 (031:001) Elementary Psychology3 s.h.

Bachelor of Science: Human Physiology

The Bachelor of Science with a major in human physiology requires a minimum of 120 s.h., including 60 s.h. of work for the major (26 s.h. in health and human physiology and 34 s.h. in required cognate courses). Students must maintain a g.p.a. of at least 2.00 in all courses for the major and in all UI courses for the major. They also must complete the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences General Education Program.

The major in human physiology is designed primarily for individuals who intend to continue their education beyond the B.S. in the health professions, including medicine, dentistry, optometry, physician assistant, physical therapy, and podiatry, and for those who intend to pursue graduate degrees in basic life sciences. The program includes study in anatomy, biomechanics, physiology, neural control of movement, and the cognate areas of biology, chemistry, mathematics, physics, and statistics.

Students majoring in human physiology (B.S.) may not earn a second degree in health and human physiology (B.A.).

In addition to course work required for the major, students are encouraged to include specific electives to complete the credit required for graduation; see "Recommended Electives" below. The department recommends that students fulfill the General Education Program's Natural Sciences requirement by taking CHEM:1110 (004:011) Principles of Chemistry I, CHEM:1120 (004:012) Principles of Chemistry II, and BIOL:1411 (002:031) Foundations of Biology. It also recommends that they fulfill the Social Sciences requirement with PSY:1001 (031:001) Elementary Psychology.

The major in human physiology requires the following course work.

HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY

All of these:

HHP:1100 (027:053) Human Anatomy3 s.h.
HHP:1110 (027:054) Human Anatomy Laboratory1 s.h.
HHP:1310 (027:051) Human Physiology Laboratory1 s.h.
HHP:3500 (027:130) Human Physiology3 s.h.

At least 18 s.h. from these:

HHP:3110 (027:154) Advanced Anatomy Laboratory3 s.h.
HHP:3300 (027:117) Human Growth and Motor Development3 s.h.
HHP:3450 (027:177) Immunology in Health and Disease3 s.h.
HHP:3510 (027:132) Advanced Human Physiology Laboratory3 s.h.
HHP:4130 (027:155) Skeletal Muscle Physiology3 s.h.
HHP:4150 (027:150) Clinical Exercise Physiology3 s.h.
HHP:4200 (027:138) Metabolic Exercise Testing and Prescription3 s.h.
HHP:4210 (027:139) Musculoskeletal Exercise Testing and Prescription3 s.h.
HHP:4220 (027:197) Biomechanics of Human Motion3 s.h.
HHP:4230 (027:158) Motor Learning: Theory and Application3 s.h.
HHP:4250 (027:161) Human Pathophysiology3 s.h.
HHP:4300 (027:160) Neural Control of Posture and Movement3 s.h.
HHP:4410 (027:141) Exercise Physiology3 s.h.
HHP:4440 (027:143) Physiology of Nutrition3 s.h.
HHP:4450 (027:146) Genetic Basis of Disease3 s.h.
HHP:4460 (027:145) Cardiovascular Physiology3 s.h.
HHP:4470 (027:148) Physiology of Aging3 s.h.
HHP:4480 (027:165) Introduction to Human Pharmacology3 s.h.
HHP:4500 (027:195) Undergraduate Independent Studyarr.
HHP:4900 (027:199) Honors Research II3 s.h.
BIOC:3110 (099:110) Biochemistry3 s.h.
BIOL:2254 (002:150) Endocrinology3 s.h.
BIOL:2512 (002:128) Fundamental Genetics4 s.h.
BIOL:2603 (002:105) Mechanisms of Aging3 s.h.
BIOL:2723 (002:114) Cell Biology3 s.h.
BIOL:2753 (002:145) Introduction to Neurobiology3 s.h.
BIOL:3233 (002:104) Introduction to Developmental Biology3 s.h.
MICR:2157 (061:157) General Microbiology5 s.h.

Students may count the following courses toward the human physiology requirement or the cognate requirement, but not toward both requirements: BIOC:3110 (099:110) Biochemistry, BIOL:2254 (002:150) Endocrinology, BIOL:2512 (002:128) Fundamental Genetics, BIOL:2603 (002:105) Mechanisms of Aging, BIOL:2723 (002:114) Cell BiologyBIOL:2753 (002:145) Introduction to Neurobiology, BIOL:3233 (002:104) Introduction to Developmental Biology, and MICR:2157 (061:157) General Microbiology.

COGNATE AREAS

Students must earn a minimum of 34 s.h. in cognate areas—subjects outside of human physiology—by completing courses from the following lists. The required cognates include CHEM:1110 (004:011) Principles of Chemistry I (see "Chemistry" below), which some students complete for admission to the major.

Biology

This sequence:

BIOL:1411 (002:031)-BIOL:1412 (002:032) Foundations of Biology - Diversity of Form and Function8 s.h.

At least 3 s.h. from these:

BIOC:3110 (099:110) Biochemistry3 s.h.
BIOC:3120 (099:120) Biochemistry and Molecular Biology I3 s.h.
BIOL:2254 (002:150) Endocrinology3 s.h.
BIOL:2346 (002:108) Vertebrate Zoology4 s.h.
BIOL:2512 (002:128) Fundamental Genetics4 s.h.
BIOL:2603 (002:105) Mechanisms of Aging3 s.h.
BIOL:2723 (002:114) Cell Biology3 s.h.
BIOL:2753 (002:145) Introduction to Neurobiology3 s.h.
BIOL:3233 (002:104) Introduction to Developmental Biology3 s.h.
BIOL:3244 (002:143) Animal Behavior4 s.h.
BIOL:3253 (002:180) Neurobiology4 s.h.
BIOL:3343 (002:124) Animal Physiology3 s.h.
BIOL:4353 (002:181) Neurophysiology3-4 s.h.
MICR:2157 (061:157) General Microbiology5 s.h.
MICR:3112 (061:112) Pharmacy Microbiology4 s.h.
MICR:3147 (061:147) Survey of Immunology3 s.h.
MICR:3164 (061:164) Nursing Microbiology4 s.h.

Students may count the following courses toward the human physiology requirement or the cognate requirement, but not toward both requirements: BIOC:3110 (099:110) Biochemistry, BIOL:2254 (002:150) Endocrinology, BIOL:2512 (002:128) Fundamental Genetics, BIOL:2603 (002:105) Mechanisms of Aging, BIOL:2723 (002:114) Cell BiologyBIOL:2753 (002:145) Introduction to NeurobiologyBIOL:3233 (002:104) Introduction to Developmental Biology, and MICR:2157 (061:157) General Microbiology.

Chemistry

Students must complete CHEM:1110 (004:011) before they may register for CHEM:1120 (004:012).

Both of these:

CHEM:1110 (004:011) Principles of Chemistry I (unless already taken for admission to the major)4 s.h.
CHEM:1120 (004:012) Principles of Chemistry II4 s.h.

These additional chemistry courses are highly recommended.

CHEM:2210 (004:121) Organic Chemistry I3 s.h.
CHEM:2220 (004:122) Organic Chemistry II3 s.h.
CHEM:2410 (004:141) Organic Chemistry Laboratory3 s.h.
Mathematics

One of these:

MATH:1460 (22M:016) Calculus for the Biological Sciences4 s.h.
MATH:1550 (22M:031) Engineering Mathematics I: Single Variable Calculus4 s.h.
MATH:1850 (22M:025) Calculus I (or a mathematics course numbered above 1850)4 s.h.
Physics

This sequence:

PHYS:1511 (029:011)-PHYS:1512 (029:012) College Physics I-II8 s.h.
Statistics

At least 3 s.h. from these:

STAT:2010 (22S:030) Statistical Methods and Computing3 s.h.
STAT:3510 (22S:101) Biostatistics3 s.h.
STAT:4143 (22S:102)/PSQF:4143 (07P:143) Introduction to Statistical Methods3 s.h.
RECOMMENDED ELECTIVES

The department recommends that students choose from the following electives in order to complete the minimum of 120 s.h. required for a Bachelor of Science. Additional recommended courses in biology and chemistry are listed under "Courses for the Major: Cognates" above.

Anthropology

ANTH:3305 (213:190) Human Osteology3 s.h.

Biochemistry

BIOC:3110 (099:110) Biochemistry3 s.h.
BIOC:3120 (099:120) Biochemistry and Molecular Biology I3 s.h.
BIOC:3130 (099:130) Biochemistry and Molecular Biology II3 s.h.
BIOC:3140 (099:140) Experimental Biochemistry2 s.h.

Biology

BIOL:2254 (002:150) Endocrinology3 s.h.
BIOL:2346 (002:108) Vertebrate Zoology4 s.h.
BIOL:2512 (002:128) Fundamental Genetics4 s.h.
BIOL:2723 (002:114) Cell Biology3 s.h.
BIOL:2753 (002:145) Introduction to Neurobiology3 s.h.
BIOL:3244 (002:143) Animal Behavior4 s.h.
BIOL:3253 (002:180) Neurobiology4 s.h.
BIOL:3343 (002:124) Animal Physiology3 s.h.
BIOL:4353 (002:181) Neurophysiology3 s.h.

Chemistry

CHEM:2210 (004:121) Organic Chemistry I3 s.h.
CHEM:2220 (004:122) Organic Chemistry II3 s.h.
CHEM:2410 (004:141) Organic Chemistry Laboratory3 s.h.
CHEM:3110 (004:111) Analytical Chemistry I3 s.h.
CHEM:3120 (004:112) Analytical Chemistry II3 s.h.
CHEM:4431 (004:131) Physical Chemistry I3 s.h.

Classics

CLSA:3750 (20E:103) Medical and Technical Terminology2 s.h.

Communication Sciences and Disorders

CSD:2140 (003:140) Manual Communication1 s.h.
CSD:3116 (003:116) Basic Neuroscience for Speech and Hearing3 s.h.

Computer Science

CS:1020 (22C:001) Principles of Computing3 s.h.
CS:1110 (22C:005) Introduction to Computer Science3 s.h.
CS:1210 (22C:016) Computer Science I: Fundamentals4 s.h.
ENGR:2730 (057:017) Computers in Engineering3 s.h.

Education

RCE:4185 (07C:185) Introduction to Substance Abuse3 s.h.

Engineering

ENGR:2110 (059:007) Engineering Fundamentals I: Statics2 s.h.
ENGR:2710 (057:010) Dynamics3 s.h.
ENGR:2750 (057:019) Mechanics of Deformable Bodies3 s.h.

English

CNW:2680 (08N:080) The Art and Craft of Creative Nonfiction3 s.h.

Free Radical and Radiation Biology

FRRB:5000 (077:103) Radiation Biology4 s.h.

Health Promotion

HHP:4200 (027:138) Metabolic Exercise Testing and Prescription3 s.h.
HHP:4210 (027:139) Musculoskeletal Exercise Testing and Prescription3 s.h.

Microbiology

MICR:2157 (061:157) General Microbiology5 s.h.
MICR:3112 (061:112) Pharmacy Microbiology4 s.h.
MICR:3147 (061:147) Survey of Immunology3 s.h.
MICR:3164 (061:164) Nursing Microbiology4 s.h.

Pharmacology

PCOL:2120 (071:120) Drugs: Their Nature, Action, and Use2 s.h.
PCOL:4130 (071:130) Drug Mechanisms and Actions3 s.h.

Psychology

PSY:1001 (031:001) Elementary Psychology3 s.h.
PSY:2930 (031:063) Abnormal Psychology: Health Professions3 s.h.
PSY:3010 (031:152) Health Psychology3 s.h.
PSY:3220 (031:126) Behavioral Neuroscience3 s.h.
PSY:3230 (031:128) Psychopharmacology3 s.h.
PSY:3250 (031:129) Neuroscience of Learning and Memory3 s.h.
PSY:3320 (031:163) Abnormal Psychology3 s.h.

Bachelor of Science: Athletic Training

The Bachelor of Science with a major in athletic training requires a minimum of 120 s.h., including 53-54 s.h. of work for the major plus one prerequisite (1 s.h.) for application to the major and several prerequisites (34-36 s.h.) to course work for the major. Students must maintain a g.p.a. of at least 2.00 in all courses for the major and in all UI courses for the major. They also must complete the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences General Education Program.

The major provides concentrated studies and clinical experiences that lead to national certification in athletic training. The Department of Health and Human Physiology collaborates with the Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation (Carver College of Medicine) to offer the major.

Athletic trainers work with active patients, including athletes, to help prevent injuries, offer advice about appropriate equipment, recognize and evaluate injuries, administer emergency treatment, and determine need for specialized medical care. Athletic trainers also work as members of health care teams involved in postinjury rehabilitation.

Employment opportunities for graduates include work as health care professionals for sports medicine clinics and hospitals; these individuals often work with secondary school athletic teams. Additional education usually is required for employment with professional, college, and university athletic teams and for specialized positions in corporations, industry, and other areas. Teacher certification is recommended but not required.

Admission to the major in athletic training is competitive; students must apply. They may be admitted as first-year students and begin clinical experience as sophomores. Applicants must have at least 11 s.h. of graded college credit (pass/fail credit does not count), including ATEP:1010 (027:096) Exploring Athletic Training with a grade of C or higher; and they must have a g.p.a. of at least 2.50 on all undergraduate course work. Preference is given to applicants with high scholastic standing, strong writing skills, and varied athletic training and health care experience. A personal interview may be required; the athletic training program contacts applicants about interviews.

Fulfillment of admission requirements does not ensure admission to the athletic training major. The program selects candidates who appear to be best qualified for the study and practice of athletic training. Students denied admission to the major may reapply in a subsequent fall semester.

All students admitted to the major in athletic training are required to comply with entrance and periodic health screening history and immunization, which is coordinated through the program's medical director.

Students who have not formally contacted the athletic training program director before enrolling at The University of Iowa should talk to an athletic training advisor or their academic advisor upon entering the University. Early advising for course selection is vital to ensure that students take prerequisites and sequenced skill development courses in the right order. Students should begin taking prerequisites for required major courses during their first year and should complete their final prerequisites after admission to the athletic training major.

For current information on rules, procedures, and curriculum, contact the athletic training program director.

The major in athletic training requires the following course work.

ADMISSION PREREQUISITE

Students must complete this course before they apply for admission to the athletic training major.

ATEP:1010 (027:096) Exploring Athletic Training1 s.h.
PREQUISITES TO COURSE WORK FOR THE MAJOR

Students must complete the following courses (34-36 s.h.) as they begin course work for the major.

One of these:

BIOL:1141 (002:002) Introductory Animal Biology4 s.h.
BIOL:1411 (002:031) Foundations of Biology4 s.h.

One of these sequences:

CHEM:1070 (004:007) & CHEM:1080 (004:008) General Chemistry I-II6 s.h.
CHEM:1110 (004:011) & CHEM:1120 (004:012) Principles of Chemistry I-II8 s.h.

One of these:

PHYS:1400 (029:008) Basic Physics4 s.h.
PHYS:1511 (029:011) College Physics I4 s.h.

All of these:

ATEP:1000 (027:056) First Aid and CPR2 s.h.
ATEP:2030 (027:057) Basic Athletic Training3 s.h.
HHP:1100 (027:053) Human Anatomy3 s.h.
LEIS:1045 (169:045) Health for Living3 s.h.
PSQF:1075 (07P:075) Educational Psychology and Measurement3 s.h.
PSY:1001 (031:001) Elementary Psychology3 s.h.
STAT:1020 (22S:025)/PSQF:1020 (07P:025) Elementary Statistics and Inference3 s.h.
COURSES FOR THE MAJOR

Students must complete the following course work for the major (53-54 s.h.).

One of these:

HHP:3400 (027:140) Applied Exercise Physiology3 s.h.
HHP:4410 (027:141) Exercise Physiology3 s.h.

One of these:

HHP:1300 (027:050) Fundamentals of Human Physiology3 s.h.
HHP:3500 (027:130) Human Physiology3 s.h.

One of these:

HHP:4480 (027:165) Introduction to Human Pharmacology3 s.h.
PCOL:2120 (071:120) Drugs: Their Nature, Action, and Use2 s.h.
PCOL:4130 (071:130) Drug Mechanisms and Actions3 s.h.

All of these:

ATEP:2010 (027:036) & ATEP:2020 (027:037) Practicum in Athletic Training I-II4 s.h.
ATEP:2040 (027:172) Clinical Sciences I2 s.h.
ATEP:2060 (027:180) Advanced Emergency Care for Athletic Trainers2 s.h.
ATEP:3010 (027:182) & ATEP:3040 (027:183) Clinical Sciences III-IV6 s.h.
ATEP:3020 (027:185) Clinical Sciences V: Rehabilitation2 s.h.
ATEP:3030 (027:186) Practicum in Athletic Training III (must be taken twice)6 s.h.
ATEP:4010 (027:171) Administration of Athletic Training Programs2 s.h.
HHP:3060 (027:118) Advanced Human Anatomy for Athletic Trainers4 s.h.
HHP:4220 (027:197) Biomechanics of Human Motion3 s.h.
HHP:4440 (027:143) Physiology of Nutrition (or equivalent)3 s.h.
ORTH:4187 (076:187) Practicum in Athletic Training IV (must be taken twice)8 s.h.
RCE:4199 (07C:199) Counseling for Related Professions (or equivalent)3 s.h.

Bachelor of Science: Sport and Recreation Management

The Bachelor of Science with a major in sport and recreation management requires a minimum of 120 s.h., including 39 s.h. of work for the major (24 s.h. in sport and recreation management and 15 s.h. in supporting course work from other disciplines). Students must maintain a g.p.a. of at least 2.00 in all courses for the major and in all UI courses for the major. They also must complete the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences General Education Program.

The sport and recreation management major prepares students for leadership in meeting the challenges of sport. Its comprehensive curriculum uses an integrative business approach and provides a collaborative environment for learning how to analyze and resolve challenges in the business and culture of sport locally, nationally, and internationally.

The major is appropriate for students who want to work with sport and club teams, intercollegiate and high school athletic programs, international sport organizations, national and international amateur sport organizations, community recreation, and firms specializing in sport marketing, sport sponsorship, and commercial fitness businesses.

Students interested in sport and recreation management learn skills for organizing, planning, and budgeting in a variety of settings. They prepare for work in positions such as activities director, community recreation specialist, campus recreation professional, and program coordinator in a park or recreation department.

The major also provides a foundation for graduate study in sport or recreation management and related graduate degree programs.

Work for the major consists of foundation courses in sport and recreation management plus a concentration area, which includes courses in other disciplines. Students have the option to complete an internship, with a preinternship seminar, for an additional 10 s.h. of credit.

The sport and recreation management major requires the following course work.

FOUNDATION COURSES

One of these:

LEIS:1060 (169:060) Contemporary Issues in Sports3 s.h.
LEIS:2065 (169:065) The Experience Economy3 s.h.

All of these:

LEIS:3151 (169:151) Liability in Recreation and Sport3 s.h.
LEIS:3152 (169:152) Recreation and Sport Facility Management3 s.h.
LEIS:3153 (169:153) Sport Business Practices3 s.h.
LEIS:3156 (169:156) Design of Recreation Facilities3 s.h.
LEIS:3158 (169:158) Recreation and Sport Promotion3 s.h.
LEIS:3172 (169:172) Finance in Sport and Recreation3 s.h.

One of these:

LEIS:3150 (169:150) Recreation Administration3 s.h.
LEIS:3157 (169:157) Managerial Operations in Sport3 s.h.
CONCENTRATION AREAS

Students complete the requirements (total of 15 s.h.) for one of the following concentration areas: business studies, coaching and sport instruction, entrepreneurship, event management, sport and diversity, or student-defined concentration.

Business Studies Concentration

Students must earn 15 s.h. for the concentration, chosen from the following list.

LEIS:4197 (169:197) Recreation and Sport Business Practicum1-3 s.h.
LEIS:4198 (169:198) NCAA Rules Compliance and Enforcement3 s.h.
ACCT:2100 (06A:001) Introduction to Financial Accounting3 s.h.
ACCT:2200 (06A:002) Managerial Accounting3 s.h.
CNW:3640 (08N:113) Writing for Business and Industry3 s.h.
ECON:1100 (06E:001) Principles of Microeconomics4 s.h.
ECON:1200 (06E:002) Principles of Macroeconomics4 s.h.
ECON:3690 (06E:165) Sports Economics3 s.h.
FIN:3000 (06F:100) Introductory Financial Management3 s.h.
MGMT:2000 (06J:047) Introduction to Law3 s.h.
MGMT:2100 (06J:048) Introduction to Management3 s.h.
MSCI:1500 (06K:050) Business Computing Essentials2 s.h.
Coaching and Sport Instruction Concentration

Students must earn 15 s.h. for the concentration, chosen from the following list. This concentration includes all courses needed for a state coaching certificate.

ATEP:1000 (027:056) First Aid and CPR2 s.h.
ATEP:2030 (027:057) Basic Athletic Training3 s.h.
HHP:1100 (027:053) Human Anatomy3 s.h.
HHP:2130 (027:044) Human Development Through the Life Span3 s.h.
HHP:2200 (027:039) Physical Activity and Health3 s.h.
HHP:3020 (027:127) Nutrition for Health, Fitness, and Sport3 s.h.
HHP:3300 (027:117) Human Growth and Motor Development (prior course in anatomy, human physiology, or biology recommended)3 s.h.
HHP:3400 (027:140) Applied Exercise Physiology (at least one prior human physiology course recommended)3 s.h.
LEIS:3149 (169:149) Coaching Interscholastic Athletics3 s.h.
LEIS:4197 (169:197) Recreation and Sport Business Practicum1-3 s.h.
LEIS:4198 (169:198) NCAA Rules Compliance and Enforcement3 s.h.
EDTL:3114 (07E:114) Parent-Child Relationships3 s.h.
EDTL:3131 (07E:131) Movement Education2 s.h.
Entrepreneurship Concentration

Students must earn 15 s.h. for the concentration, chosen from the following list. Students who choose ENTR:1350 (06T:050) Foundations in Entrepreneurship must register for ENTR:2000 (06T:120) Entrepreneurship and Innovation during the same semester if they have not taken ACCT:2100 (06A:001) Introduction to Financial Accounting and MKTG:3000 (06M:100) Introduction to Marketing Strategy.

ECON:3690 (06E:165) Sports Economics3 s.h.
ENTR:1350 (06T:050) Foundations in Entrepreneurship2 s.h.
ENTR:2000 (06T:120) Entrepreneurship and Innovation3 s.h.
ENTR:3100 (06T:133) Entrepreneurial Finance3 s.h.
ENTR:3200 (06T:134) Entrepreneurial Marketing3 s.h.
ENTR:3300 (06T:145) Legal Aspects of Entrepreneurship3 s.h.
ENTR:3400 (06T:146) Strategic Management of Technology and Innovation3 s.h.
ENTR:3500 (06T:147) Social Entrepreneurship3 s.h.
ENTR:3595 (06T:144) Nonprofit Organizational Effectiveness I3 s.h.
ENTR:3600 (06T:148) E-Commerce Strategies for Entrepreneurs3 s.h.
ENTR:4400 (06T:150) Managing the Growth Business3 s.h.
ENTR:4450 (06T:151) Professional Sports Management3 s.h.
Event Management Concentration

Students must earn 15 s.h. for the concentration, chosen from the following lists.

One of these:

LEIS:3147 (169:147) Sport Event Management3 s.h.
LEIS:3154 (169:154) Foundations of Event Management (recommended)3 s.h.

And at least four of these (total of 12 s.h.):

LEIS:1061 (169:061) Recreation Leadership and Programming3 s.h.
LEIS:4197 (169:197) Recreation and Sport Business Practicum1-3 s.h.
BUS:3800 (06B:140) Business Writing3 s.h.
ENTR:1350 (06T:050) Foundations in Entrepreneurship2 s.h.
ENTR:2000 (06T:120) Entrepreneurship and Innovation3 s.h.
ENTR:3500 (06T:147) Social Entrepreneurship3 s.h.
ENTR:3600 (06T:148) E-Commerce Strategies for Entrepreneurs3 s.h.
ENTR:4450 (06T:151) Professional Sports Management3 s.h.
JMC:1500 (019:050) Social Media Today3 s.h.
Sport and Diversity Concentration

Students must earn 15 s.h. for the concentration, chosen from the following list.

HHP:2500 (027:076) Psychological Aspects of Sport and Physical Activity3 s.h.
LEIS:1040 (169:040) The Good Society3 s.h.
LEIS:1070 (169:070) Perspectives on Leisure and Play3 s.h.
LEIS:1072 (169:072) Leisure and the Liberal Arts3 s.h.
AFAM:1020 (129:061) Introduction to African American Culture3 s.h.
AFAM:1030 (129:060) Introduction to African American Society3 s.h.
AFAM:2600 (129:093) Black Culture and Experience3 s.h.
AFAM:2610 (129:097)/LEIS:1097 (169:097) Race, Sport, and Globalization3 s.h.
AFAM:3925 (129:122) African Americans and the Media3 s.h.
ANTH:1101 (113:003) Cultural Anthropology3 s.h.
ANTH:1401 (113:014) Language, Culture, and Communication3 s.h.
CLSA:1875 (20E:075) Ancient Sports and Leisure3 s.h.
COMM:1174 (036:074) Media and Society3 s.h.
COMM:4143 (036:143) Classical Rhetoric and Greek Culture3 s.h.
HIST:1040 (016:040) Perspectives: Diversity in American History3 s.h.
JMC:1200 (019:091) Media History and Culture3 s.h.
JMC:1500 (019:050) Social Media Today3 s.h.
RELS:2700 (032:060) Sacred World of Native Americans3 s.h.
SOC:1310 (034:018) Gender and Society3-4 s.h.
SPAN:2700 (035:070) Introduction to Latin American Studies3 s.h.
SPST:1074 (028:074)/AMST:1074 (045:074)/GWSS:1074 (131:074) Inequality in American Sport3 s.h.
Student-Defined Concentration

Students may develop a concentration in consultation with an academic advisor. The student must submit a two-page proposal to the sport and recreation management committee; the proposal should provide a rationale for the student-defined concentration and should describe the concentration. The student-defined concentration must require at least 15 s.h. of work.

OPTIONAL INTERNSHIP

Students who decide to complete the optional internship must register for both of these.

LEIS:4190 (169:190) Preinternship Seminar1 s.h.
LEIS:4196 (169:196) Recreation Sport Business Internship9 s.h.

Bachelor of Science: Therapeutic Recreation

The Bachelor of Science with a major in therapeutic recreation requires a minimum of 120 s.h., including 63-64 s.h. of work for the major (total credit depends on the track). Students must maintain a g.p.a. of at least 2.00 in all courses for the major and in all UI courses for the major. They also must complete the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences General Education Program.

The therapeutic recreation program prepares students for professional work with persons who have disabilities, impairments, and illnesses. Both of the major's tracks emphasize the use of a systematic process of assessment, planning, implementation, and evaluation in order to provide recreation, leisure, and play activities to individuals and populations.

Admission to both tracks is selective; students must apply and be admitted.

The major in therapeutic recreation (child life track and inclusive recreation track) requires the following course work.

Child Life Track

The child life track requires 63 s.h. of work for the major (12 s.h. in admission prerequisites plus a total of 51 s.h. in additional courses, supporting course work from other departments, and the required internship). Students must apply and be admitted to the child life track, and they must complete the admission prerequisites before they may enter the track.

Child life specialists are professionals with expertise in child development who advance effective coping through play activities, preparation for medical procedures and operations, patient and family education, and self-expressive activities. Child life specialists provide services to support families and to promote children's mastery of varied experiences, particularly children's health care events. They provide care to children's families by assisting in accurate information processing and helping family members and other caregivers. Child life specialists also help educate other medical staff and community members regarding issues and needs of children involved in health care events or other stressful experiences. For more information about the profession, visit Child Life Council.

Before students who apply to the child life track may be admitted, they must complete 24 s.h. at The University of Iowa (or 12 s.h. for transfer students), including the courses listed under "Child Life: Admission Prerequisites" below. Applicants must have a University of Iowa g.p.a. of at least 3.00 and a cumulative g.p.a. of at least 3.00; students with lower grade-point averages may apply for exceptional admission.

Applicants for admission to the track should use the child life track application form on the Department of Health and Human Physiology web site. Completed applications must be submitted by March 15 for admission the following fall semester (students may enter the child life track only in fall).

Students who complete the child life track curriculum, including the child life internship, are eligible to sit for the Child Life Professional Certification Examination administered by the Child Life Council. The exam confers professional certification.

The major in therapeutic recreation with the child life track requires the following course work.

CHILD LIFE: ADMISSION PREREQUISITES

All of these:

HHP:1100 (027:053) Human Anatomy3 s.h.
LEIS:1070 (169:070) Perspectives on Leisure and Play3 s.h.
PSY:1001 (031:001) Elementary Psychology3 s.h.

One of these:

PSY:2501 (031:015) Introduction to Social Psychology3 s.h.
SOC:1010 (034:001) Introduction to Sociology Principles3-4 s.h.
SOC:3210 (034:020) Principles of Social Psychology3-4 s.h.
CHILD LIFE: COMMON CORE

All of these:

LEIS:1061 (169:061) Recreation Leadership and Programming3 s.h.
LEIS:1077 (169:077) Introduction to Child Life3 s.h.
LEIS:3160 (169:160) Introduction to Therapeutic Recreation3 s.h.
LEIS:3161 (169:161) Assessment and Evaluation in Therapeutic Recreation3 s.h.
LEIS:3162 (169:162) Therapeutic Recreation: Clientele3 s.h.
CHILD LIFE: FOUNDATION

All of these:

LEIS:3165 (169:165) Child Life: Methods and Materials3 s.h.
LEIS:3166 (169:166) Child Life: Seminar3 s.h.
LEIS:3260 (169:175) Play and Childhood3 s.h.
LEIS:4167 (169:167) Child Life Practicum (taken twice, once for 1 s.h. and once for 2 s.h.)3 s.h.

One of these:

HHP:2130 (027:044) Human Development Through the Life Span3 s.h.
NURS:1030 (096:030) Human Development and Behavior3 s.h.
PSY:2401 (031:014) Introduction to Developmental Science3 s.h.
CHILD LIFE: SUPPORTING COURSE WORK

Students must complete 9 s.h. from these. Other supporting courses may be added with consent of the student's advisor.

LEIS:3170 (169:170) Children and Health Care3 s.h.
LEIS:3171 (169:171) Child Life Practical Application3 s.h.
LEIS:3174 (169:174) Cultural Perspectives in Health Care3 s.h.
LEIS:4169 (169:169) Spring Break Child Life Experience1 s.h.
CLSA:3750 (20E:103) Medical and Technical Terminology2 s.h.
DST:3101 (219:101) Introduction to Disability Studies3 s.h.
EDTL:3114 (07E:114) Parent-Child Relationships3 s.h.
EDTL:4940 (07U:140) Characteristics of Disabilities3 s.h.
EDTL:4990 (07U:190) Interdisciplinary Issues in Disabilities1-3 s.h.
PSY:2301 (031:013) Introduction to Clinical Psychology3 s.h.
PSY:2930 (031:063) Abnormal Psychology: Health Professions3 s.h.
RCE:4145 (07C:145) Marriage and Family Interaction3 s.h.
RCE:4176 (07C:176) Child Abuse: Assessment, Intervention, and Advocacy3 s.h.
RCE:4199 (07C:199) Counseling for Related Professions3 s.h.
SOC:2222 (034:022) Introduction to Social Work4 s.h.
SOC:3710 (034:061) The American Family3 s.h.
SSW:3786 (042:186) Death/Dying: Issues Across the Life Span3 s.h.
SSW:6238 (042:238) Introduction to Play Therapy2 s.h.
SSW:6281 (042:281) Social Work Practice: Selected Aspectsarr.
CHILD LIFE: INTERNSHIP

Child life students must complete an internship; they register for the following course.

LEIS:4192 (169:192) Child Life Internship12 s.h.

Inclusive Recreation Track

The inclusive recreation track requires 64 s.h. of work for the major (12 s.h. in admission prerequisites plus a total of 52 s.h. in additional courses, supporting course work from other departments, and the required internship). Students must apply and be admitted to the inclusive recreation track, and they must complete the admission prerequisites before they may enter the track.

Inclusive recreation is a health-oriented field that involves providing recreation programs designed to improve or maintain the physical, emotional, mental, and social functioning of patients and consumers. Inclusive recreation's therapeutic services involve a continuum of care that uses recreational activities to improve functional abilities; leisure education to help individuals acquire skills, knowledge, and attitudes that facilitate an independent lifestyle; and other activities to enhance health, growth, development, and independence through intrinsically rewarding leisure behavior. Inclusive recreation provides opportunities for people with all abilities and disabilities to participate together in therapeutic recreation programs based on choice and common interests.

Inclusive recreation professionals are commonly employed in settings such as skilled nursing facilities, community recreation departments, state and community mental health institutions, general hospitals, physical rehabilitation centers, special recreation districts, correctional facilities, senior centers, facilities for persons with intellectual disabilities or mental illness, and substance-abuse programs.

Before students who apply to the inclusive recreation track may be admitted, they must complete 24 s.h. at The University of Iowa (or 12 s.h. for transfer students), including the courses listed under "Inclusive Recreation: Admission Prerequisites" below. Applicants must have a University of Iowa g.p.a. of at least 2.50 and a cumulative g.p.a. of at least 2.50; students with lower grade-point averages may apply for exceptional admission.

Applicants for admission to the track should use the inclusive recreation track application form on the Department of Health and Human Physiology web site. Completed applications must be submitted by October 15 for admission the following spring semester or by March 15 for admission the following fall semester.

Students who complete the inclusive recreation curriculum, including the therapeutic recreation internship, are eligible to sit for the National Council for Therapeutic Recreation Certification Exam. The exam confers the Certified Therapeutic Recreation Specialist credential.

The major in therapeutic recreation with the inclusive recreation track requires the following course work.

INCLUSIVE RECREATION: ADMISSION PREREQUISITES

All of these:

HHP:1100 (027:053) Human Anatomy3 s.h.
LEIS:1070 (169:070) Perspectives on Leisure and Play3 s.h.
PSY:1001 (031:001) Elementary Psychology3 s.h.

One of these:

PSY:2501 (031:015) Introduction to Social Psychology3 s.h.
SOC:1010 (034:001) Introduction to Sociology Principles3-4 s.h.
SOC:3210 (034:020) Principles of Social Psychology3-4 s.h.
INCLUSIVE RECREATION: COMMON CORE

All of these:

LEIS:1061 (169:061) Recreation Leadership and Programming3 s.h.
LEIS:1077 (169:077) Introduction to Child Life3 s.h.
LEIS:3160 (169:160) Introduction to Therapeutic Recreation3 s.h.
LEIS:3161 (169:161) Assessment and Evaluation in Therapeutic Recreation3 s.h.
LEIS:3162 (169:162) Therapeutic Recreation: Clientele3 s.h.
INCLUSIVE RECREATION: FOUNDATION

All of these:

LEIS:3163 (169:163) Concepts and Issues in Therapeutic Recreation: Advancement of the Profession3 s.h.
LEIS:3164 (169:164) Therapeutic Recreation: Rehabilitation3 s.h.
LEIS:3261 (169:176) Inclusive Recreation3 s.h.
PSY:2930 (031:063) Abnormal Psychology: Health Professions3 s.h.

One of these:

HHP:2130 (027:044) Human Development Through the Life Span3 s.h.
NURS:1030 (096:030) Human Development and Behavior3 s.h.
INCLUSIVE RECREATION: SUPPORTING COURSE WORK

Students must complete 9 s.h. in supporting course work in human services (aging studies, disability studies, psychology, sociology, social work, and special education).  Students should consult their advisors.

INCLUSIVE RECREATION: INTERNSHIP

Both of these:

LEIS:4190 (169:190) Preinternship Seminar1 s.h.
LEIS:4191 (169:191) Therapeutic Recreation Internship12 s.h.

Four-Year Graduation Plan

The following checkpoints list the minimum requirements students must complete by certain semesters in order to stay on the University's Four-Year Graduation Plan. (Courses in the major are those required to complete the major; they may be offered by departments other than the major department.)

Note: Students entering majors with selective admission must be admitted to their major on schedule in order to complete the Four-Year Graduation Plan.

B.A.: Health and Human Physiology

Before the fifth semester begins: one foundation course and at least six more courses in the major

Before the seventh semester begins: at least six more courses in the major (total of 13) and at least 90 s.h. earned toward the degree

Before the eighth semester begins: at least two more courses in the major (total of 15)

During the eighth semester: enrollment in all remaining course work in the major, all remaining General Education courses, and a sufficient number of semester hours to graduate

B.S.: Human Physiology

Before the fifth semester begins: calculus and at least six more courses in the major

Before the seventh semester begins: at least six more courses in the major (total of 13) and at least 90 s.h. earned toward the degree

Before the eighth semester begins: at least two more courses in the major (total of 15)

During the eighth semester: enrollment in all remaining course work in the major, all remaining General Education courses, and a sufficient number of semester hours to graduate

B.S.: Athletic Training

Before the fifth semester begins: nine courses in the major

Before the seventh semester begins: at least 90 s.h. earned toward the degree

Before the eighth semester: three more courses in the major (total of 12)

During the eighth semester: enrollment in all remaining course work in the major, all remaining General Education courses, and a sufficient number of semester hours to graduate

B.S.: Sport and Recreation Management

The Four-Year Graduation Plan is not available to sport and recreation management students who complete the optional internship. Students who choose the internship option should work with their advisors to develop individual graduation plans.

Before the fifth semester begins: four foundation courses and at least 3 s.h. in the concentration area

Before the seventh semester begins: two more foundation courses (total of six), an additional 6 s.h. in the concentration area, and at least 90 s.h. earned toward the degree

Before the eighth semester begins: two more foundation courses (total of eight) and the remaining concentration area courses

During the eighth semester: enrollment in all remaining course work in the major, all remaining General Education courses, and a sufficient number of semester hours to graduate

B.S.: Therapeutic Recreation

Before the fifth semester begins: all core courses and at least one foundation course

Before the seventh semester begins: two more foundation courses (total of three), 3 s.h. of supporting course work, and at least 90 s.h. earned toward the degree

Before the eighth semester begins: two more foundation courses (total of five) and the remaining supporting course work

During the eighth semester: enrollment in all remaining course work in the major, all remaining General Education courses, and a sufficient number of semester hours to graduate

Honors in the Major

Students majoring in health and human physiology, human physiology, athletic training, sport and recreation management, or therapeutic recreation have the opportunity to graduate with honors in the major. Departmental honors students must maintain a g.p.a. of at least 3.33 in work for their major.

Health and human physiology: in order to graduate with honors in the major, students must successfully complete a health and human physiology honors designation course, research practicum, teaching practicum, or service learning course. They must successfully complete HHP:4940 (027:187) Health Promotion Honors Readings and HHP:4950 (027:188) Health Promotion Honors Problems and must write an honors thesis, usually based on original research or creative work. They also must make an oral or poster presentation of the honors thesis in an approved venue, such as a department research seminar or a professional conference.

Human physiology: in order to graduate with honors in the major, students must complete the honors research course sequence HHP:4800 (027:198) Honors Research I and HHP:4900 (027:199) Honors Research II; write an honors thesis that is deposited with the University of Iowa Honors Program and is judged to be of honors quality; and make an oral presentation of their research and thesis that is judged to be of honors quality.

Athletic training: in order to graduate with honors in the major, students must complete the practicum course sequence ATEP:3030 (027:186) Practicum in Athletic Training III and ORTH:4187 (076:187) Practicum in Athletic Training IV. They also must write an honors thesis that is deposited with the University of Iowa Honors Program and is judged to be of honors quality.

Sport and recreation management, or therapeutic recreation: in order to graduate with honors in either major, students must successfully complete LEIS:4194 (169:194) Honors Readings and LEIS:4195 (169:195) Honors Problems, in which they conduct a reading or research project under the supervision of a faculty member in their major and write a paper summarizing the project's results.

Departmental honors students must be members of the University of Iowa Honors Program, which requires students to maintain a cumulative University of Iowa g.p.a. of at least 3.33 and to fulfill other requirements; visit Honors at Iowa to learn about the University's honors program.

Minor: Human Physiology

The minor in human physiology requires a minimum of 15 s.h. in Department of Health and Human Physiology courses, including 12 s.h. in courses numbered 3000 or above. Students must maintain a g.p.a. of at least 2.00 in all courses for the minor and in all UI courses for the minor. Course work in the minor may not be taken pass/nonpass. Transfer credit does not count toward the minor.

Students majoring in health and human physiology (B.A.), human physiology (B.S.), or athletic training (B.S.) may not earn the minor in human physiology.

Students choose courses for the minor from the following list. Enrollment in HHP:3510 (027:132) Advanced Human Physiology Laboratory and HHP:4220 (027:197) Biomechanics of Human Motion requires special permission. Some of these courses have prerequisites; students must complete all of a course's prerequisites before they may register for the course.

HHP:1100 (027:053) Human Anatomy3 s.h.
HHP:1110 (027:054) Human Anatomy Laboratory1 s.h.
HHP:1310 (027:051) Human Physiology Laboratory1 s.h.
HHP:3110 (027:154) Advanced Anatomy Laboratory3 s.h.
HHP:3300 (027:117) Human Growth and Motor Development3 s.h.
HHP:3400 (027:140) Applied Exercise Physiology3 s.h.
HHP:3450 (027:177) Immunology in Health and Disease3 s.h.
HHP:3500 (027:130) Human Physiology3 s.h.
HHP:3510 (027:132) Advanced Human Physiology Laboratory3 s.h.
HHP:4130 (027:155) Skeletal Muscle Physiology3 s.h.
HHP:4150 (027:150) Clinical Exercise Physiology3 s.h.
HHP:4220 (027:197) Biomechanics of Human Motion3 s.h.
HHP:4230 (027:158) Motor Learning: Theory and Application3 s.h.
HHP:4250 (027:161) Human Pathophysiology3 s.h.
HHP:4300 (027:160) Neural Control of Posture and Movement3 s.h.
HHP:4410 (027:141) Exercise Physiology3 s.h.
HHP:4440 (027:143) Physiology of Nutrition3 s.h.
HHP:4450 (027:146) Genetic Basis of Disease3 s.h.
HHP:4460 (027:145) Cardiovascular Physiology3 s.h.
HHP:4470 (027:148) Physiology of Aging3 s.h.
HHP:4480 (027:165) Introduction to Human Pharmacology3 s.h.

Minor: Physical Activity and Nutrition Science

The minor in physical activity and nutrition science requires a minimum of 15 s.h. in Department of Health and Human Physiology courses, including at least 9 s.h. in courses numbered 3000 or above. Students must maintain a g.p.a. of at least 2.00 in all courses for the minor and in all UI courses for the minor. Course work in the minor may not be taken pass/nonpass. Transfer credit does not count toward the minor.

Students majoring in health and human physiology (B.A.), human physiology (B.S.), or athletic training (B.S.) may not earn the minor in physical activity and nutrition science.

The minor in physical activity and nutrition science is designed in conjunction with the Obesity Research and Education initiative. The minor provides a specialized group of courses that unify concepts underlying the causes, consequences, treatment, and prevention of obesity, with attention to physical activity, nutrition, physiology, psychology, and human disease. Students who earn the minor will be prepared to apply their knowledge in areas such as clinical health professions, public health policy, personal coaching and fitness, health psychology, and health promotion.

For the minor, students complete three core courses plus two elective courses that focus on various facets of obesity and on its treatment and prevention. One of the core courses and both of the elective courses are at the intermediate or advanced level. Students choose electives in consultation with an undergraduate advisor. Some courses for the minor have prerequisites; students must complete all of a course's prerequisites before they may register for the course.

The minor in physical activity and nutrition science requires the following course work.

Core courses—all of these:

HHP:2200 (027:039) Physical Activity and Health3 s.h.
HHP:2310 (027:040) Nutrition and Health3 s.h.
HHP:3050 (027:128) Obesity: Causes, Consequences, Prevention, and Treatment3 s.h.

Electives—two courses from the following lists:

HHP:3000 (027:120) Equity Issues in the Health Sciences3 s.h.
HHP:3030 (027:131) Coaching for Health and Wellness3 s.h.
HHP:3440 (027:147) Physical Activity and Healthy Communities3 s.h.
HHP:3500 (027:130) Human Physiology3 s.h.
HHP:3650 (027:174) Advanced Sport and Exercise Psychology3 s.h.
HHP:3655 (027:175) Emotional and Psychological Aspects of Health3 s.h.
HHP:4230 (027:158) Motor Learning: Theory and Application3 s.h.
HHP:4310 (027:133) Sport and Exercise Nutrition3 s.h.
HHP:4320 (027:134) Nutrition Interventions3 s.h.
HHP:4340 (027:135) Global Health and Global Food3 s.h.
HHP:4390 (027:151) Understanding Human Disease3 s.h.
HHP:4440 (027:143) Physiology of Nutrition3 s.h.

Electives may include one of these:

HHP:3400 (027:140) Applied Exercise Physiology3 s.h.
HHP:4410 (027:141) Exercise Physiology3 s.h.

Graduate Programs of Study

  • Master of Arts in leisure studies (with or without thesis)
  • Master of Science in health and human physiology (with or without thesis)
  • Doctor of Philosophy in health and human physiology

Master of Arts

The Master of Arts program in leisure studies requires a minimum of 33 s.h. of graduate credit with thesis or 36 s.h. of graduate credit without thesis. Students choose one of two specialization areas—leisure and recreational sport management or therapeutic recreation—and must satisfy the prerequisites required for their areas. Work for each specialization area includes core requirements and area courses.

Leisure and Recreational Sport Management Specialization

The leisure and recreational sport management specialization prepares students for positions in public and private recreation and sport management. Students typically find employment in community or municipal recreation programs, campus recreation programs, or commercial recreation and sport operations.

The leisure and recreational sport management specialization requires the following course work.

LEISURE AND RECREATIONAL SPORT MANAGEMENT: CORE

All of these:

LEIS:5065 (169:265) The Economy of Experience3 s.h.
LEIS:5200 (169:200) Historical and Philosophical Perspectives on Leisure3 s.h.
PSQF:4143 (07P:143) Introduction to Statistical Methods3 s.h.
LEISURE AND RECREATIONAL SPORT MANAGEMENT: AREA COURSES

All of these:

LEIS:6251 (169:251) Risk Management3 s.h.
LEIS:6252 (169:252) Economics and Financing3 s.h.
LEIS:6253 (169:253) Sport Administration3 s.h.
LEIS:6254 (169:254) Marketing and Sport Promotion3 s.h.
Cognate area courses (sport and athletic administration, business, communications, or cultural studies)6-9 s.h.

Nonthesis students take an additional 6 s.h. of electives. Thesis students complete 6 s.h. of LEIS:7398 (169:398) M.A. Thesis.

Therapeutic Recreation Specialization

The therapeutic recreation specialization prepares students to meet the challenges of inpatient- and community-based health care service delivery. The program stresses research and practical skills that enable graduates to find the best jobs in the field.

Therapeutic recreation specialists are increasingly called upon to deliver preventive outpatient services, such as programs designed to prevent secondary impairments in persons with disabilities (e.g., arthritis exercise to manage pain, fall prevention for older adults); education for individuals with negative lifestyle habits (e.g., smoking, substance abuse); programs designed to restore meaning and purpose to life following traumatic events (e.g., following a spinal cord injury); and initiatives to help communities make services accessible to persons with disabilities.

Iowa's therapeutic recreation program emphasizes skills for delivery of services in clinical or community settings. The program includes related cognate areas, such as child life, aging, developmental disabilities, or counseling.

Students acquire research skills that they may apply directly to therapeutic recreation practice, for example, to assess the effectiveness of specific interventions or the demand for varied services in a specific setting.

The therapeutic recreation specialization requires the following course work.

THERAPEUTIC RECREATION: CORE

All of these:

LEIS:5200 (169:200) Historical and Philosophical Perspectives on Leisure3 s.h.
LEIS:5205 (169:205) Research Methods and Leisure Behavior3 s.h.
PSQF:4143 (07P:143) Introduction to Statistical Methods3 s.h.
THERAPEUTIC RECREATION: AREA COURSES

All of these:

LEIS:3160 (169:160) Introduction to Therapeutic Recreation3 s.h.
LEIS:3161 (169:161) Assessment and Evaluation in Therapeutic Recreation3 s.h.
LEIS:3162 (169:162) Therapeutic Recreation: Clientele3 s.h.
LEIS:3163 (169:163) Concepts and Issues in Therapeutic Recreation: Advancement of the Profession3 s.h.
LEIS:3164 (169:164) Therapeutic Recreation: Rehabilitation3 s.h.
Cognate area courses (aging studies, child life, counseling, disability studies)9-12 s.h.

Thesis students complete 6 s.h. of LEIS:7398 (169:398) M.A. Thesis.

Therapeutic recreation students must complete a practicum, LEIS:7290 (169:290) Graduate Internship, in order to sit for a national certification examination.

Master of Science

The Master of Science program in health and human physiology requires 30-32 s.h. of graduate credit. Required credit varies by track: the athletic training track requires a minimum of 30 s.h. and is offered without thesis; the clinical exercise physiology track requires a minimum of 32 s.h. and is offered without thesis; the health and human physiology track requires a minimum of 30 s.h. and is offered with thesis.

Students interested in pursuing a Ph.D. after earning a master's degree should choose the M.S. health and human physiology track (with thesis).

Athletic Training Track

The athletic training track provides an advanced clinical education and research area of study for certified athletic trainers. It focuses on a health care team approach to sports medicine, medical care management, wellness, pediatric/adolescent health, and special health populations. The program emphasizes application of established research findings to the wide variety of problems encountered in everyday practice.

In order to be admitted to the program, athletic trainers must have completed the following prerequisite course work and must hold the following certifications.

anatomy  (3-4 s.h.);

human physiology (3 s.h.);

athletic training core—prevention (3 s.h.), evaluation and recognition (3 s.h.), modalities (3 s.h.), rehabilitation (3 s.h.), administrative (2 s.h.);

exercise science core—exercise physiology (3 s.h.), biomechanics (3 s.h.);

current emergency certification; and

Board of Certification (BOC) certification and state license.

The Master of Science with the athletic training track requires the following course work.

STATISTICS CORE

One of these:

BIOS:5110 (171:161) Introduction to Biostatistics3 s.h.
STAT:4143 (22S:102) Introduction to Statistical Methods3 s.h.
EXERCISE SCIENCE CORE

Three of these:

HHP:3110 (027:154) Advanced Anatomy Laboratory3 s.h.
HHP:4130 (027:155) Skeletal Muscle Physiology3 s.h.
HHP:4150 (027:150) Clinical Exercise Physiology3 s.h.
HHP:4220 (027:197) Biomechanics of Human Motion3 s.h.
HHP:4300 (027:160) Neural Control of Posture and Movement3 s.h.
HHP:4310 (027:133) Sport and Exercise Nutrition3 s.h.
HHP:4410 (027:141) Exercise Physiology3 s.h.
HHP:4440 (027:143) Physiology of Nutrition3 s.h.
HHP:4450 (027:146) Genetic Basis of Disease3 s.h.
HHP:4460 (027:145) Cardiovascular Physiology3 s.h.
HHP:4470 (027:148) Physiology of Aging3 s.h.
HHP:4480 (027:165) Introduction to Human Pharmacology3 s.h.
HHP:6130 (027:255) Advanced Skeletal Muscle Physiology1-3 s.h.
HHP:6150 (027:250) Advanced Clinical Exercise Physiology1-3 s.h.
HHP:6210 (027:249) Epidemiology of Physical Activity3 s.h.
HHP:6410 (027:240) Advanced Exercise Physiology3 s.h.
HHP:6460 (027:245) Advanced Cardiovascular Physiology1-3 s.h.
HHP:6480 (027:265) Advanced Human Pharmacology3 s.h.
HHP:7300 (027:260) Advanced Neural Control of Posture and Movement1-3 s.h.
CLINICAL RESEARCH TOOLS

One approved clinical tool course in computer science, counseling, epidemiology, health promotion, leisure studies, nursing, or pathology.

ATHLETIC TRAINING CORE

All of these:

HHP:5000 (027:200) Problems2 s.h.
HHP:6010 (027:301) Non-Thesis Seminar2 s.h.
HHP:7000 (027:202) Practicum in College Teaching2-3 s.h.

One of these:

EPID:4400 (173:140) Epidemiology I: Principles3 s.h.
PATH:8133 (069:133) Introduction to Human Pathology for Graduate Students4 s.h.
PSQF:6205 (07P:205) Design of Instruction3 s.h.
ELECTIVES

Students choose elective courses that enhance their concentration in medical care management, wellness, pediatric/adolescent health, or special health populations. Course selection must be approved by the advisor.

Clinical Exercise Physiology Track

The clinical exercise physiology track provides an advanced scientific and clinical education. It prepares students to be allied health professionals who work in the application of physical activity and behavioral interventions for clinical diseases and health conditions including cardiovascular, pulmonary, metabolic, orthopaedic, neuromuscular, immunologic, and hematologic diseases.

In order to be admitted to the program, students must:

hold a B.S. or B.A. with a g.p.a. of at least 3.00; and

have completed anatomy and physiology with laboratories (8 s.h.).

The Master of Science with the clinical exercise physiology track requires the following course work.

STATISTICS CORE

One of these:

BIOS:5110 (171:161) Introduction to Biostatistics3 s.h.
STAT:3510 (22S:101) Biostatistics3 s.h.
STAT:4143 (22S:102) Introduction to Statistical Methods3 s.h.
ADVANCED STATISTICS

One of these:

BIOS:5120 (171:162) Design and Analysis of Biomedical Studies3 s.h.
STAT:6513 (22S:148) Intermediate Statistical Methods4 s.h.
CLINICAL EXERCISE PHYSIOLOGY CORE

All of these:

HHP:6150 (027:250) Advanced Clinical Exercise Physiology1-3 s.h.
HHP:6200 (027:238) Advanced Metabolic Exercise Testing and Prescription3 s.h.
HHP:6410 (027:240) Advanced Exercise Physiology3 s.h.
HHP:6460 (027:245) Advanced Cardiovascular Physiology1-3 s.h.
HHP:6480 (027:265) Advanced Human Pharmacology3 s.h.

Two enrollments (1 s.h. each) chosen from these:

HHP:6300 (027:314) Seminar in Motor Control1 s.h.
HHP:6400 (027:241) Integrative Physiology Seminar1 s.h.
HHP:6500 (027:296) Seminar in Health Promotion1 s.h.
INTERNSHIP

Students complete an individually arranged internship, usually during their second year, earning 3 s.h. of credit.

ELECTIVES

Students choose elective courses that enhance their concentration in human and exercise physiology, clinical exercise physiology, prescriptive exercise and training for health and fitness, health maintenance, and understanding human disease. Students complete a minimum of two courses from the following list, with their advisor's approval.

HHP:3050 (027:128) Obesity: Causes, Consequences, Prevention, and Treatment3 s.h.
HHP:3650 (027:174) Advanced Sport and Exercise Psychology3 s.h.
HHP:4190 (027:159) Scientific Basis of Training for Elite Performance3 s.h.
HHP:4210 (027:139) Musculoskeletal Exercise Testing and Prescription3 s.h.
HHP:4400 (027:152) Health Promotion Clinical Practicum1 s.h.
HHP:6130 (027:255) Advanced Skeletal Muscle Physiology1-3 s.h.
HHP:6210 (027:249) Epidemiology of Physical Activity3 s.h.
HHP:6470 (027:248) Advanced Physiology of Aging3 s.h.
HHP:7300 (027:260) Advanced Neural Control of Posture and Movement1-3 s.h.
ACB:5203 (060:203) Gross Human Anatomy for Graduate Students6 s.h.
BIOL:3743 (002:192) Basic Biology of Human Disease2 s.h.
EPID:4110 (173:110) Quality Dietary Studies for Individuals and Environment3 s.h.
EPID:4400 (173:140) Epidemiology I: Principles3 s.h.
EPID:6350 (173:235) Nutritional Epidemiology2 s.h.
EPID:6650 (173:265) Cardiovascular Disease Epidemiology3 s.h.
EPID:6360 (173:236) Nutrition Intervention in Clinical Trials Research2 s.h.
PSY:3010 (031:152) Health Psychology3 s.h.
PSY:3340 (031:170) Behavior Modification3 s.h.
PTRS:6224 (101:224) Activity-Based Neural and Musculoskeletal Plasticity in Health Care4 s.h.
PTRS:7812 (101:212) Biomedical Instrumentation and Measurement3 s.h.
PTRS:7875 (101:275) Analysis of Activity-Based Neural and Musculoskeletal Plasticity3 s.h.

Health and Human Physiology Track

The health and human physiology track requires a thesis. Students who intend to earn a Ph.D. after the master's degree should choose this track. In order to be admitted to the program, students must:

hold a B.S. or B.A. with a g.p.a. of at least 3.00; and

have completed courses in anatomy and physiology with laboratory (8 s.h.) and basic physics (3 s.h.).

The Master of Science with the health and human physiology track requires the following work.

ADVANCED STATISTICS

One of these:

BIOS:5120 (171:162) Design and Analysis of Biomedical Studies3 s.h.
NURS:7002 (096:338) Designing Research3 s.h.
NURS:7003 (096:344) Quantitative Research4 s.h.
STAT:6513 (22S:148) Intermediate Statistical Methods4 s.h.
RESEARCH METHODS

One of these:

LEIS:5205 (169:205) Research Methods and Leisure Behavior3 s.h.
EALL:5150 (07X:150) Introduction to Educational Research3 s.h.
NURS:7002 (096:338) Designing Research3 s.h.
NURS:7003 (096:344) Quantitative Research4 s.h.
PSQF:6220 (07P:220) Quantitative Educational Research Methodologies3 s.h.
SEMINAR COURSES

Four enrollments (1 s.h. each) chosen from these:

HHP:6300 (027:314) Seminar in Motor Control1 s.h.
HHP:6400 (027:241) Integrative Physiology Seminar1 s.h.
HHP:6500 (027:296) Seminar in Health Promotion1 s.h.
ELECTIVES

Students choose elective courses that broaden their knowledge in health and human physiology and related disciplines and that enhance their knowledge in their specific areas of interest. Students choose electives with guidance from their advisor/mentor. Electives may include the following.

HHP:3050 (027:128) Obesity: Causes, Consequences, Prevention, and Treatment3 s.h.
HHP:3650 (027:174) Advanced Sport and Exercise Psychology3 s.h.
HHP:4190 (027:159) Scientific Basis of Training for Elite Performance3 s.h.
HHP:4210 (027:139) Musculoskeletal Exercise Testing and Prescription3 s.h.
HHP:5000 (027:200) Problemsarr.
HHP:6000 (027:201) Researcharr.
HHP:6130 (027:255) Advanced Skeletal Muscle Physiology1-3 s.h.
HHP:6150 (027:250) Advanced Clinical Exercise Physiology1-3 s.h.
HHP:6200 (027:238) Advanced Metabolic Exercise Testing and Prescription3 s.h.
HHP:6210 (027:249) Epidemiology of Physical Activity3 s.h.
HHP:6410 (027:240) Advanced Exercise Physiology3 s.h.
HHP:6460 (027:245) Advanced Cardiovascular Physiology1-3 s.h.
HHP:6470 (027:248) Advanced Physiology of Aging3 s.h.
HHP:6480 (027:265) Advanced Human Pharmacology3 s.h.
HHP:7300 (027:260) Advanced Neural Control of Posture and Movement1-3 s.h.
ACB:5203 (060:203) Gross Human Anatomy for Graduate Students6 s.h.
BIOC:3110 (099:110) Biochemistry3 s.h.
CBH:5220 (172:150) Health Behavior and Health Education3 s.h.
EPID:4400 (173:140) Epidemiology I: Principles3 s.h.
EPID:5241 (173:241) Statistical Methods in Epidemiology3 s.h.
EPID:5600 (173:160) Introduction to Epidemiology Data Management and Analysis3 s.h.
EPID:6350 (173:235) Nutritional Epidemiology2 s.h.
EPID:6400 (173:240) Epidemiology II: Advanced Methods4 s.h.
EPID:6600 (173:260) Epidemiology of Chronic Diseases3 s.h.
MPB:5153 (072:153) Graduate Physiology4 s.h.
PTRS:7812 (101:212) Biomedical Instrumentation and Measurement3 s.h.
PTRS:7875 (101:275) Analysis of Activity-Based Neural and Musculoskeletal Plasticity3 s.h.
THESIS

Both of these:

HHP:7500 (027:404) Thesis: M.S.4 s.h.
GRAD:7270 (650:270) Principles of Scholarly Integrity (takes two semesters to complete)0 s.h.

Doctor of Philosophy

The Doctor of Philosophy program in health and human physiology requires a minimum of 72 s.h. of graduate credit.

Doctoral students should have a strong background in the natural sciences and/or health promotion, and a working knowledge of statistics and research methodology. Students may acquire additional knowledge of statistics and research methodology after entering the program.

All Ph.D. students complete a common core of courses, scientific area courses, courses in their specialization, and 10 s.h. of independent research in addition to the dissertation requirement. They must complete a dissertation in their specialization area and must submit an appropriate manuscript of the dissertation to a refereed professional journal for publication.

Some courses in the program are offered by other departments. Faculty members from those departments frequently serve on comprehensive examination committees and on dissertation committees for the initial presentation of a candidate's prospectus. They also participate in the final examination.

The Doctor of Philosophy requires the following course work.

COMMON CORE

All of these:

HHP:6000 (027:201) Research10 s.h.
HHP:7900 (027:405) Thesis: Ph.D.12 s.h.
BIOS:5120 (171:162) Design and Analysis of Biomedical Studies3 s.h.
GRAD:7270 (650:270) Principles of Scholarly Integrity (takes two semesters to complete)0 s.h.
STAT:6513 (22S:148) Intermediate Statistical Methods4 s.h.
SEMINAR COURSES

Four enrollments (1-2 s.h. each) chosen from these:

HHP:6300 (027:314) Seminar in Motor Control1 s.h.
HHP:6400 (027:241) Integrative Physiology Seminar1 s.h.
HHP:6500 (027:296) Seminar in Health Promotion1 s.h.
SCIENTIFIC AREA COURSES

Students obtain a breadth of knowledge over the key scientific areas that constitute the basis of the major by completing at least three courses outside of their specialization area.

SPECIALIZATION ELECTIVES

Students are expected to obtain broad-based knowledge in their specialization area. This normally entails approximately 30 s.h. of course work. Students choose specialization electives with guidance from their advisor/mentor. Electives may include the following.

HHP:3060 (027:118) Advanced Human Anatomy for Athletic Trainers4 s.h.
HHP:4200 (027:138) Metabolic Exercise Testing and Prescription3 s.h.
HHP:4310 (027:133) Sport and Exercise Nutrition3 s.h.
HHP:6200 (027:238) Advanced Metabolic Exercise Testing and Prescription3 s.h.
HHP:6210 (027:249) Epidemiology of Physical Activity3 s.h.
ACB:5203 (060:203) Gross Human Anatomy for Graduate Students6 s.h.
ACB:8114 (060:234) Medical Neuroscience4 s.h.
BIOC:3110 (099:110) Biochemistry3 s.h.
BIOC:3120 (099:120) Biochemistry and Molecular Biology I3 s.h.
BIOC:3130 (099:130) Biochemistry and Molecular Biology II3 s.h.
BIOC:3140 (099:140) Experimental Biochemistry2 s.h.
BIOL:3253 (002:180) Neurobiology4 s.h.
BME:5610 (051:150) Musculoskeletal Biomechanics3 s.h.
CBH:5220 (172:150) Health Behavior and Health Education3 s.h.
EPID:4400 (173:140) Epidemiology I: Principles3 s.h.
EPID:5241 (173:241) Statistical Methods in Epidemiology3 s.h.
EPID:5600 (173:160) Introduction to Epidemiology Data Management and Analysis3 s.h.
EPID:6350 (173:235) Nutritional Epidemiology2 s.h.
EPID:6400 (173:240) Epidemiology II: Advanced Methods4 s.h.
EPID:6600 (173:260) Epidemiology of Chronic Diseases3 s.h.
FRRB:7000 (077:222) Redox Biology and Medicine4 s.h.
IE:3400 (056:144) Human Factors3 s.h.
ME:5150 (058:150) Intermediate Mechanics of Deformable Bodies3 s.h.
MPB:5153 (072:153) Graduate Physiology4 s.h.
NSCI:4353 (132:181) Neurophysiology3-4 s.h.
NSCI:4753 (132:184) Developmental Neurobiology3 s.h.
NSCI:7180 (132:180) Neurobiology4 s.h.
NSCI:7235 (132:235) Neurobiology of Disease3 s.h.
OEH:4310 (175:190) Occupational Ergonomics I2-3 s.h.
OEH:6310 (175:295) Clinical Ergonomics3 s.h.
OEH:6320 (175:294) Occupational Ergonomics II3 s.h.
PSY:5210 (031:241) Fundamentals of Behavioral Neuroscience4 s.h.
PTRS:5210 (101:210) Kinesiology and Pathomechanics4 s.h.
PTRS:6224 (101:224) Activity-Based Neural and Musculoskeletal Plasticity in Health Care4 s.h.
PTRS:7812 (101:212) Biomedical Instrumentation and Measurement3 s.h.
PTRS:7875 (101:275) Analysis of Activity-Based Neural and Musculoskeletal Plasticity3 s.h.
PTRS:7885 (101:285) Biomechanical Analysis in Rehabilitation3 s.h.
DISSERTATION

Students working on a dissertation register for the following course.

HHP:7900 (027:405) Thesis: Ph.D.arr.

Admission

Admission to the department's graduate programs is based on grade-point average and score on the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) General Test. Applicants to the M.S. program must have an undergraduate g.p.a. of at least 3.00. Applicants to the Ph.D. program must have a g.p.a. of at least 3.00 on undergraduate work and previous graduate work.

Applicants must meet the admission requirements of the Graduate College; see the Manual of Rules and Regulations of the Graduate College or the Graduate College section of the Catalog.

Application deadline is February 1 for admission the following fall semester.

Facilities

Classroom and research laboratories are located in the Field House and in other buildings on campus. They provide excellent facilities for instruction and research at both the undergraduate and graduate levels.

Cooperative efforts with other units facilitate specialization by allowing health and human physiology students to use additional special facilities and research equipment in other departments on campus (e.g., biology, biochemistry, molecular physiology and biophysics, orthopaedic surgery, internal medicine, pharmacology, and the College of Engineering).

Courses

Lower-Level Undergraduate

Athletic Training Program
 

ATEP:1000 (027:056) First Aid and CPR2 s.h.
American Red Cross certification: basic first aid, CPR procedures.
 
ATEP:1010 (027:096) Exploring Athletic Trainingarr.
Exploration of professional preparation for athletic trainers; application, career opportunities, professional organizations, awareness of basic athletic training principles.
 
ATEP:2010 (027:036) Practicum in Athletic Training I2 s.h.
Basic clinical skill instruction, evaluation, and integration for athletic trainers. Requirements: athletic training major.
 
ATEP:2020 (027:037) Practicum in Athletic Training II2 s.h.
Integration of basic physical skills and orientation to traditional settings; clinical experience for first‑year students arranged through the athletic training program. Requirements: grade of C or higher in ATEP:2010 (027:036).
 
ATEP:2030 (027:057) Basic Athletic Training3 s.h.
Basic pathology, epidemiology, materials biology for prevention and immediate care of athletic injuries.
 
ATEP:2040 (027:172) Clinical Sciences I2 s.h.
Theoretical knowledge base in therapeutic modalities. Offered spring semesters. Requirements: grade of C or higher in ATEP:2010 (027:036).
 
ATEP:2060 (027:180) Advanced Emergency Care for Athletic Trainers1-2 s.h.
Coordinated initial professional emergency response certifications for athletic trainers; recertification for those holding valid certifications. Requirements: Red Cross First Aid and CPR certifications.
 

Health and Human Physiology
 

HHP:1000 (027:029) First-Year Seminar1 s.h.
Small discussion class taught by a faculty member; topics chosen by instructor; may include outside activities (e.g., films, lectures, performances, readings, visits to research facilities). Requirements: first‑ or second‑semester standing.
 
HHP:1050 (027:049) Exploring Exercise Science1 s.h.
Introduction to field of exercise science; employment and observation opportunities, academic and professional development.
 
HHP:1100 (027:053) Human Anatomy3 s.h.
General human anatomy covering most systems of the body. GE: Natural Sciences without Lab.
 
HHP:1110 (027:054) Human Anatomy Laboratory1 s.h.
All major systems of the human body, understood through computer‑generated images, models, histological slides, anatomical specimens. GE: Natural Sciences Lab only.
 
HHP:1300 (027:050) Fundamentals of Human Physiology3 s.h.
Introduction to function and regulation of the human body. Recommendations: high school chemistry and basic biology. GE: Natural Sciences without Lab.
 
HHP:1310 (027:051) Human Physiology Laboratory1 s.h.
Introductory laboratory course illustrating principles of human physiology through fundamental experimental measurements and computer simulation. Recommendations: one semester of biology.
 
HHP:2130 (027:044) Human Development Through the Life Span3 s.h.
Overview of human developmental theories across the life‑span; aspects of cognitive, physical, and personality development from birth to death; the role of culture, environment, health, and economic factors over the developmental process and life continuum.
 
HHP:2150 (027:035) Stress Management3 s.h.
Recent theoretical concepts and scientific evidence regarding stress and its effects on body and mind; intervention methods, strategies for managing stress; opportunity for students to use intervention techniques to manage stress.
 
HHP:2200 (027:039) Physical Activity and Health3 s.h.
Physical activity determinants in society; school, workplace, community‑based health promotion interventions to improve activity levels. GE: Values, Society, and Diversity.
 
HHP:2210 (027:030) Principles of Exercise Leadership3 s.h.
Exercise standards, guidelines for aerobic/exercise instructors; aerobic workout components, contraindicated exercises, injury prevention and treatment. Prerequisites: HHP:2200 (027:039).
 
HHP:2310 (027:040) Nutrition and Health3 s.h.
Physiology, biochemistry of human nutrition; appropriate food sources; qualitative and quantitative evaluation of diets using standard references. GE: Natural Sciences without Lab.
 
HHP:2350 (027:095) Biomechanics of Sport and Physical Activity3 s.h.
Principles of biomechanics, kinesiology, and anatomy; quantitative aspects of sport and physical activity; emphasis on developing a qualitative grasp on mechanical principles of human movement within sports and physical activity; how to apply these principles in a sport/exercise environment. Prerequisites: HHP:1100 (027:053).
 
HHP:2500 (027:076) Psychological Aspects of Sport and Physical Activity3 s.h.
Psychological theory and research related to sport and physical activity; motivation, aggression, attribution, socialization, competitive anxiety, leadership.
 

Sport and Recreation Management
 

LEIS:1060 (169:060) Contemporary Issues in Sports3 s.h.
Basic philosophical, historical, scientific foundations and developments; function, settings of organized recreation.
 
LEIS:2065 (169:065) The Experience Economy3 s.h.
Introduction to emerging experience economy; just as manufacturing sector of economy supersedes agriculture and service economy supersedes manufacturing, how experience economy is now gaining ascendancy as the last, best hope for future economic growth; critical analysis of experience economy with discussion of ways in which experience economy may offer green, moral, and humane alternatives to previous stages of economic development; new opportunities for travel and tourism, sports settings, recreation and wellness services, possible applications in education and helping professions.
 

Therapeutic Recreation
 

LEIS:1029 (169:029) First-Year Seminar1 s.h.
Small discussion class taught by a faculty member; topics chosen by instructor; may include outside activities (e.g., films, lectures, readings, visits to research facilities).
 
LEIS:1030 (169:030) Introduction to Critical Thinking3 s.h.
Concepts and skills required for critical thinking about what should and should not be taken as true; analysis and evaluation of a variety of complex extended arguments. GE: Quantitative or Formal Reasoning.
 
LEIS:1040 (169:040) The Good Society3 s.h.
Critiques of the existing social order, articulation of models of a good society with associated conceptions of the good life. GE: Values, Society, and Diversity.
 
LEIS:1045 (169:045) Health for Living3 s.h.
Personal health strategies; focus on disease prevention, wellness. GE: Values, Society, and Diversity.
 
LEIS:1050 (169:050) Making Choices: Interdisciplinary Perspectives3 s.h.
Interdisciplinary consideration of what we know, value, hope, and should do; focus on case studies of private, professional, and social decision making. GE: Values, Society, and Diversity.
 
LEIS:1061 (169:061) Recreation Leadership and Programming3 s.h.
Leadership principles, techniques; programming techniques.
 
LEIS:1070 (169:070) Perspectives on Leisure and Play3 s.h.
Relationships between leisure and economics, sociology, other social sciences; effect of leisure on individual and group behavior; antecedents, motives, consequences of leisure behavior. GE: Social Sciences.
 
LEIS:1072 (169:072) Leisure and the Liberal Arts3 s.h.
Integration of the ideal of a liberal education with worthy, meaningful use of free time in contemporary society; classic writings in the humanities. GE: Values, Society, and Diversity.
 
LEIS:1077 (169:077) Introduction to Child Life3 s.h.
Orientation to the field of child life services including services for hospitalized children and their families.
 
LEIS:1097 (169:097) Race, Sport, and Globalization3 s.h.
Introduction to current discussion surrounding the link between sport, race, and globalization; critical cultural studies perspective used to examine the meaning of race and sport within a global context; labor migration of talented athletes, identity politics, and dynamics of equality in sport along such lines as race, class, and gender; examination of African American diaspora within a sport context to study political, economic, and social construction of race and sport on African and Asian continents. Same as AFAM:2610 (129:097).
 
LEIS:1800 (169:085) Basic Aspects of Aging3 s.h.
Social, psychological, and biological aspects; demographics of aging, health, economic issues, primary relationships, social services. GE: Social Sciences. Same as ASP:1800 (153:085), NURS:1800 (096:085), SSW:1800 (042:085), CSD:1800 (003:085).
 

Upper-Level Undergraduate and Graduate

Athletic Training Program
 

ATEP:3010 (027:182) Clinical Sciences III3 s.h.
Theoretical and practical skill development in the areas of musculoskeletal evaluation for ankle, knee, shoulder, and upper extremity. Offered fall semesters. Prerequisites: ATEP:2040 (027:172). Requirements: athletic training major.
 
ATEP:3020 (027:185) Clinical Sciences V: Rehabilitation2 s.h.
Rehabilitation for athletic trainers based on the theory and principles of therapeutic exercise; application of current research concepts. Prerequisites: ATEP:2040 (027:172). Corequisites: ATEP:3010 (027:182). Requirements: athletic training major.
 
ATEP:3030 (027:186) Practicum in Athletic Training III3 s.h.
Advanced clinical skill instruction, evaluation, and integration for athletic trainers. Requirements: grade of C or higher in ATEP:2020 (027:037).
 
ATEP:3040 (027:183) Clinical Sciences IV3 s.h.
Continuation of musculoskeletal evaluation, completion of EENT, chest, abdomen, and dermatologic evaluation; integration of rehabilitation programs. Offered spring semesters. Requirements: grade of C or higher in ATEP:3010 (027:182).
 
ATEP:4010 (027:171) Administration of Athletic Training Programs2 s.h.
Health care supervision, professional athletic training responsibilities, philosophies in athletic health care. Offered fall semesters. Prerequisites: ATEP:2030 (027:057).
 

Health and Human Physiology
 

HHP:3000 (027:120) Equity Issues in the Health Sciences3 s.h.
Examination of equity issues in the health sciences, including a review of the historical challenges that led to Human Subjects Review Boards, FDA oversight of drug development and clinical trials, inclusion of women in research; effect of situational ethics in the workplace; potential danger of making assumptions about clients/patients; importance of developing an inclusive communication style; assessing the effectiveness of family‑friendly employment policies in providing equitable opportunities for career advancement for both women and men. Recommendations: junior or senior standing. Same as INTD:3020 (145:120).
 
HHP:3005 (027:109) Scientific Reasoning3 s.h.
Patterns of reasoning useful for understanding and evaluating scientific evidence, theory, controversy; historical and contemporary examples from the physical, biological, behavioral, biomedical sciences. GE: Quantitative or Formal Reasoning.
 
HHP:3010 (027:125) Contemporary Nutrition3 s.h.
Introduction to nutrition; importance of understanding food choices and diet to fit individual needs. Same as INTD:3025 (145:125).
 
HHP:3020 (027:127) Nutrition for Health, Fitness, and Sport3 s.h.
Effects of exercise and nutrition on health‑ and sports‑related fitness; for professionals in health and physical education. Same as INTD:3027 (145:127).
 
HHP:3030 (027:131) Coaching for Health and Wellness3 s.h.
Opportunities to expand knowledge and develop skills to help individuals change behavior and meet health‑related goals; general health and wellness principles; principles and techniques for change; experience providing health‑coaching services to clients. Prerequisites: HHP:2200 (027:039) and HHP:2310 (027:040). Same as INTD:3030 (145:130).
 
HHP:3050 (027:128) Obesity: Causes, Consequences, Prevention, and Treatment3 s.h.
In‑depth overview of biological, behavioral, and societal causes and consequences of obesity epidemic; potential solutions from primary and secondary prevention standpoints; causes of obesity, available treatments, and global impact that obesity epidemic presents to society. Prerequisites: HHP:2200 (027:039) and HHP:2310 (027:040).
 
HHP:3060 (027:118) Advanced Human Anatomy for Athletic Trainers4 s.h.
Extremities and relevant body cavity anatomy; anatomical terminology, anatomical relationships of human body, 3‑D view of anatomy, clinical relevance of anatomy; basic science lectures, radiologic imaging discussions, introduction to clinically relevant anatomy, dissection laboratories, small group learning and teaching, faculty interaction, and computer‑assisted resources. Offered summer sessions. Prerequisites: HHP:1100 (027:053).
 
HHP:3100 (027:110) Health Literacy3 s.h.
Community and clinical issues related to health literacy; focus on understanding individual and systemic factors that influence health literacy, including education, context, culture, and health care systems. Prerequisites: HHP:2200 (027:039) and HHP:2310 (027:040).
 
HHP:3110 (027:154) Advanced Anatomy Laboratory3 s.h.
Detailed gross anatomy of all major systems of the body; structure of the human body at organ, tissue, and cellular levels; examination of various human and other mammalian specimens. Prerequisites: HHP:1100 (027:053) and HHP:1110 (027:054).
 
HHP:3200 (027:136) Health Behavior and Health Promotion3 s.h.
Principles of epidemiology and health behavior theories applied to multilevel frameworks for health promotion. Prerequisites: HHP:2200 (027:039) and HHP:2310 (027:040).
 
HHP:3300 (027:117) Human Growth and Motor Development3 s.h.
Human growth and biological maturation; focus on motor development from birth through puberty. Offered fall semesters. Recommendations: prior course in anatomy, human physiology, or biology.
 
HHP:3400 (027:140) Applied Exercise Physiology3 s.h.
Effects of acute exercise and chronic exercise training on different physiological systems (energy, neuromuscular, circulatory, respiratory, endocrine); overview of physiological principles necessary for more advanced study of fitness evaluation and exercise prescription; preparation for ACSM certification. Prerequisites: HHP:1300 (027:050) or HHP:3500 (027:130). Recommendations: at least one prior human physiology course.
 
HHP:3420 (027:144) College Health Education3 s.h.
Foundation of theories and models that guide health behavior change in college settings; how health issues apply to individuals and to communities to which they belong; practical experience in planning, implementing, and evaluating health programs. Prerequisites: HHP:2200 (027:039) and HHP:2310 (027:040).
 
HHP:3430 (027:137) Community and Worksite Health Promotion3 s.h.
Management and organizational theories; assessment, planning, implementation, and evaluation of clinical and work‑setting (targeted) health promotion programs. Prerequisites: HHP:2200 (027:039) and HHP:2310 (027:040).
 
HHP:3440 (027:147) Physical Activity and Healthy Communities3 s.h.
Development, implementation, evaluation of effective health communication interventions; identification of health education resources for targeted groups. Prerequisites: HHP:2200 (027:039) and HHP:2310 (027:040).
 
HHP:3450 (027:177) Immunology in Health and Disease3 s.h.
Overview of immunology, beginning at the molecular level and ending with the role of the immune system in disease; fundamental concepts of the immune system; innate and adaptive immunity, focusing on cell‑mediated and humoral immune responses, in addition to effector mechanisms in both of these responses; concepts of immunologic tolerance; autoimmune disease; immunodeficiency syndromes; the inflammatory process in disease. Prerequisites: HHP:3500 (027:130).
 
HHP:3500 (027:130) Human Physiology3 s.h.
Organ system approach to physiology; focus on normal function of human body; information on all levels of integration from submolecular to whole organism; emphasis on how intact organism functions. Prerequisites: HHP:1300 (027:050) or BIOL:1141 (002:002) or BIOL:1140 (002:021) or BIOL:1411 (002:031), and CHEM:1070 (004:007) or CHEM:1110 (004:011).
 
HHP:3510 (027:132) Advanced Human Physiology Laboratory3 s.h.
Fundamental laboratory measurements; major physiological systems, experimental design, presentation of experimental data. Corequisites: HHP:3500 (027:130), if not taken as a prerequisite.
 
HHP:3650 (027:174) Advanced Sport and Exercise Psychology3 s.h.
Application of sport and exercise psychological theory; theoretical and practical experience using psychological skills training for sport and exercise. Corequisites: HHP:2500 (027:076).
 
HHP:3655 (027:175) Emotional and Psychological Aspects of Health3 s.h.
Interfaces among emotional, psychological, and physical aspects of health; examination of how individuals with healthy psychological profiles engage in health behaviors; health‑related implications of negative emotional and psychological states; strategies for promoting healthy psychological patterns; designed for health promotion, health studies students, and others interested in health‑related careers. Prerequisites: HHP:2200 (027:039).
 
HHP:3850 (027:176) Promoting Health Globally3 s.h.
Major global health threats in the United States and abroad; impact of culture, history, economics on health disparities; approaches, programs, policies to remedy them. Requirements: junior or senior standing, or certificate student. Same as GHS:3850 (152:158).
 
HHP:3860 (027:170) Leadership Theory for Health and Fitness3 s.h.
Theories and applications of current scholarship in group and individual leadership relevant for health, sport, fitness, and exercise leadership; areas of study include group dynamics, humanist leadership, leader‑member exchange theory, transformational leadership, contingency/reinforcement leadership models, path‑goal leadership, and multi‑dimensional leadership models; approaches to leadership contextualized to build skills in cultural competence and ethics of leadership.
 
HHP:4130 (027:155) Skeletal Muscle Physiology3 s.h.
Skeletal muscle structure, contractile mechanisms, production of movement, biomechanical properties; adaptation to increased use, disuse, injury. Offered spring semesters.
 
HHP:4150 (027:150) Clinical Exercise Physiology3 s.h.
Recent advances in exercise physiology for clinical populations; emphasis on acute and chronic responses to exercise in healthy aged adults and in patients with cardiac, vascular, pulmonary, and metabolic diseases; basic and intermediate electrocardiography (ECG), pathophysiology of disease process, clinical assessment of disease severity, diagnostic testing, acute exercise responses, and exercise rehabilitation. Prerequisites: HHP:3500 (027:130) and HHP:4410 (027:141). Recommendations: HHP:4460 (027:145).
 
HHP:4190 (027:159) Scientific Basis of Training for Elite Performance3 s.h.
Application of scientific principles to goal of improving strength, speed, endurance, and overall human function; general overview of structure and function of muscular, nervous, cardiovascular, and respiratory systems; bioenergetics of exercise; endocrine response to exercise; biomechanics of resistance exercise; adaptations to anaerobic and aerobic training programs; age and sex related considerations on training; nutrition and ergogenic aids. Prerequisites: HHP:1100 (027:053), and HHP:1300 (027:050) or HHP:3500 (027:130).
 
HHP:4200 (027:138) Metabolic Exercise Testing and Prescription3 s.h.
Basic techniques in physical fitness assessment, prescription of exercise for healthy and unhealthy adults, promotion of physical activity within communities; provides knowledge and skill competencies required for certification as American College of Sports Medicine health fitness instructor. Prerequisites: HHP:2200 (027:039). Corequisites: HHP:3400 (027:140) or HHP:4410 (027:141). Requirements: health promotion, exercise science, or human physiology major.
 
HHP:4210 (027:139) Musculoskeletal Exercise Testing and Prescription3 s.h.
Educational and practical experience for designing resistance training and flexibility programs; competencies for certification with National Strength and Conditioning Association. Prerequisites: HHP:2200 (027:039). Corequisites: HHP:3400 (027:140) or HHP:4410 (027:141), if not taken as a prerequisite. Requirements: health promotion, exercise science, or human physiology major.
 
HHP:4220 (027:197) Biomechanics of Human Motion3 s.h.
Application of the principles of mechanics to investigation of human motion in two dimensions; system modeling, force system and equilibrium analysis, particle and rigid body kinematics, Newton's and Euler's equations of motion, work‑energy and impulse‑momentum integral principles. Offered spring semesters.
 
HHP:4230 (027:158) Motor Learning: Theory and Application3 s.h.
How skilled motor behavior is acquired; behavioral changes that occur during skill acquisition; structural and physiological changes that occur in central nervous system; principles of training and practice that yield efficient and effective motor learning; how this information is helpful to health professionals involved in motor rehabilitation, physical educators and coaches, music instructors and musicians, strength and conditioning professionals, fitness professionals, and athletes, among others. Prerequisites: HHP:1300 (027:050). Recommendations: familiarity with basic neuroscience (neurons, synaptic transmission, basic anatomical organization of sensory and motor systems).
 
HHP:4250 (027:161) Human Pathophysiology3 s.h.
In‑depth study of human pathological processes and their effects on homeostasis; etiology, symptoms, and risk factors of various diseases; emphasis on major diseases impacting worldwide disability and death; how pathological processes are manifested and progress in the body. Prerequisites: HHP:1100 (027:053) and HHP:3500 (027:130).
 
HHP:4300 (027:160) Neural Control of Posture and Movement3 s.h.
Neuroanatomical and neurophysiological bases of human motor control; mechanisms for locomotion and posture, control of arm and hand movements, role of sensory information. Offered spring semesters. Requirements: anatomy or human physiology course.
 
HHP:4310 (027:133) Sport and Exercise Nutrition3 s.h.
Relationship between nutrition, fitness and sport performance; basic nutrition, physiology, chemistry, psychology, food preparation. Prerequisites: HHP:2200 (027:039) and HHP:2310 (027:040).
 
HHP:4320 (027:134) Nutrition Interventions3 s.h.
Strategies that assist in assessment and evaluation of nutrition behaviors of individuals and groups; interventions to meet nutritional needs of individuals and groups with a variety of health issues. Prerequisites: HHP:2200 (027:039) and HHP:2310 (027:040). Requirements: admission to health promotion track.
 
HHP:4340 (027:135) Global Health and Global Food3 s.h.
Practices, patterns, and policies that contribute to the epidemics of obesity, diabetes, and heart disease in wealthy populations; environmental degradation, hunger, and malnutrition among impoverished populations; strategies to meet food and agricultural needs for the world; local/global aspects or perspectives on food/health concerns for Iowa and the international community. Same as GHS:4340 (152:135).
 
HHP:4350 (027:163) Practicum in Personal Training2 s.h.
Opportunity to observe personal trainers in a fitness setting; participation in process of helping clients achieve health/fitness goals. Prerequisites: HHP:1100 (027:053), HHP:1300 (027:050) or HHP:3500 (027:130), HHP:2310 (027:040), and HHP:3400 (027:140) or HHP:4410 (027:141). Requirements: CPR/AED or CPT (ACSM, ACE, NSCA, NASM, NCSF, NFPT, AFAA) certification.
 
HHP:4360 (027:164) Practicum in Group Fitness Instruction2 s.h.
Opportunity to observe group‑fitness instructors in an applied setting; help organize and execute a group‑fitness class. Prerequisites: HHP:1100 (027:053), HHP:1300 (027:050) or HHP:3500 (027:130), HHP:2310 (027:040), and HHP:3400 (027:140) or HHP:4410 (027:141). Requirements: CPR/AED or Group Fitness Instructor (ACSM, ACE, AFAA) or specific fitness (yoga, indoor cycling, crossfit) certification.
 
HHP:4370 (027:166) Practicum in Strength and Conditioning2 s.h.
Opportunity to observe strength and conditioning professionals in an applied setting; participation in process of helping athletes reach performance goals. Prerequisites: HHP:1100 (027:053), HHP:1300 (027:050) or HHP:3500 (027:130), HHP:2310 (027:040), and HHP:3400 (027:140) or HHP:4410 (027:141). Requirements: CPR/AED certification.
 
HHP:4380 (027:294) Practicum: Athletics Administrationarr.
 
HHP:4390 (027:151) Understanding Human Disease3 s.h.
Introduction to process of human disease at cell, organ, and whole body level throughout the lifespan; pathophysiological changes occurring with disease, including risk factors, disease development, and overall effects of disease on the body; cancer, diabetes, obesity, cardiovascular, neurodegenerative diseases, and aging. Prerequisites: HHP:1300 (027:050) or HHP:3500 (027:130).
 
HHP:4400 (027:152) Health Promotion Clinical Practicum1 s.h.
Experience in planning and implementing clinical health promotion programs focusing on nutrition, physical fitness, cardiac rehabilitation, and respiratory rehabilitation. Prerequisites: HHP:3200 (027:136) and HHP:4200 (027:138).
 
HHP:4405 (027:153) Health Promotion Community and Worksite Practicum1 s.h.
Planning and implementing community and worksite health promotion programs. Prerequisites: HHP:3200 (027:136) and HHP:4200 (027:138).
 
HHP:4410 (027:141) Exercise Physiology3 s.h.
Mechanisms responsible for the acute and chronic effects of exercise on the different organ systems of the body. Offered fall semesters. Prerequisites: HHP:1300 (027:050) or HHP:3500 (027:130).
 
HHP:4415 (027:162) Exercise Science Practicum1 s.h.
Experience in planning and implementing exercise programs related to physical fitness, including strength and conditioning in healthy and diseased/injured populations, and in elite athletes. Prerequisites: HHP:4200 (027:138) and HHP:4210 (027:139).
 
HHP:4420 (027:156) Planning and Evaluating Health Interventions3 s.h.
Assessment, planning, implementation, and evaluation of health promotion programs. Prerequisites: HHP:3200 (027:136). Requirements: admission to health promotion program.
 
HHP:4440 (027:143) Physiology of Nutrition3 s.h.
Metabolic and biological aspects of human energy production, relationship to energy consumption; systems or integrative approach.
 
HHP:4450 (027:146) Genetic Basis of Disease3 s.h.
Changes in single molecules that lead to systemic physiological alterations in mammals; relationship of these changes to development, aging, exercise, and specific diseases; current methodologies for studying mammalian genetics and physiology. Prerequisites: HHP:3500 (027:130).
 
HHP:4460 (027:145) Cardiovascular Physiology3 s.h.
Structure and function of cardiovascular system; heart, microcirculation, hemodynamics, regional circulation, reflex integration, regulation during physical stress. Prerequisites: HHP:3500 (027:130). Recommendations: calculus and physics.
 
HHP:4470 (027:148) Physiology of Aging3 s.h.
Aging's effects on cells, tissues, and organs; how aging influences function of major body organ systems and the whole organism; physiological mechanisms that underlie age‑related changes in body function and performance; integrative approach with focus on human aging. Prerequisites: HHP:1100 (027:053) or HHP:3500 (027:130).
 
HHP:4480 (027:165) Introduction to Human Pharmacology3 s.h.
General pharmacology (e.g., administration, distribution, and elimination of drugs, dose response curves, adverse effects, placebos, homeopathy); pharmacotherapy of selected human diseases, pathophysiologic aspects of the disease, how different classes of drugs modify pathophysiologic effects to restore health or reduce disease's impact; focus on mechanisms of drug actions in humans; adverse effects, pharmacokinetic considerations, drug interactions; how to write prescriptions. Prerequisites: HHP:3500 (027:130).
 
HHP:4490 (027:192) Diagnosing Diseases: Patient History and Physical Examination3 s.h.
Different diseases studied by interacting with patients at Meenakshi Mission Hospital and Research Center in Madurai, India; formal lectures in mornings followed by bedside teaching in afternoons and grand rounds in evenings; for pre‑health professional students.
 
HHP:4500 (027:195) Undergraduate Independent Studyarr.
Library or laboratory research related to a specific topic in human physiology, normally culminating with a written manuscript; work directed by a faculty member.
 
HHP:4510 (027:168) Energy Metabolism in Health and Disease3 s.h.
Comprehensive and molecular‑driven approach to energy metabolism during exercise and calorie restriction regimens in skeletal muscle, adipose tissue, liver, heart, brain; special emphasis on muscle metabolism and its interaction with other organ systems in treatment and prevention of metabolic diseases (e.g., obesity, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, cancer). Prerequisites: HHP:3500 (027:130). Recommendations: HHP:4410 (027:141) and BIOL:2723 (002:114).
 
HHP:4600 (027:194) Senior Seminar in Creative Problem Solving1 s.h.
Use of design thinking values and principles; collaborative work to uncover innovative solutions related to undergraduate health and human physiology experience and targeted health behaviors; interactive presentation of content, experimentation of ideas and processes, student‑led projects. Requirements: senior standing, health and human physiology or human physiology major,  and UI g.p.a. of 3.00 or higher.
 
HHP:4800 (027:198) Honors Research I2 s.h.
Research for honors thesis; selection of faculty mentor, preparation of research proposal, written and oral presentations of research proposal, literature review, participation in experiments designed to develop laboratory skills for research, work with an active research tenure‑track faculty member in a laboratory; first of a two‑semester sequence. Requirements: honors standing.
 
HHP:4900 (027:199) Honors Research II3 s.h.
Completion of honors research begun in HHP:4800 (027:198); analysis of data, writing and oral presentation of honors thesis, work with an active research tenure‑track faculty member in a laboratory; second of a two‑semester sequence. Requirements: honors standing and grade of B or higher in HHP:4800 (027:198).
 
HHP:4920 (027:190) Health Promotion Preinternship Seminar1 s.h.
Preparation for internship experience.
 
HHP:4930 (027:191) Health Promotion Internship3,6 s.h.
Directed practical field experience; program planning, implementation, evaluation, administrative procedures. Prerequisites: HHP:4200 (027:138), HHP:4210 (027:139), HHP:4320 (027:134), HHP:4420 (027:156), and HHP:4920 (027:190).
 
HHP:4935 (027:193) Clinical Exercise Physiology Internship1-6 s.h.
Directed practical field experience; program planning, implementation, evaluation, and administrative procedures.
 
HHP:4940 (027:187) Health Promotion Honors Readings1-2 s.h.
First step to complete an honors thesis; work with health and human physiology faculty member; comprehensive readings in a specific area (e.g., obesity in children, disabilities and sport); readings include primarily research reviews, popular press, and editorials; production of an annotated bibliography summarizing readings and presentation to faculty member at end of semester; brief research proposal summarizing background, research questions, and methods of selected area.
 
HHP:4950 (027:188) Health Promotion Honors Problems3-4 s.h.
Continuation of HHP:4940 (027:187); original research or creative project supervised by a faculty member.
 

Sport and Recreation Management
 

LEIS:3147 (169:147) Sport Event Management3 s.h.
Current status, challenges, and opportunities in sporting event industry; sporting event planning, budgeting, marketing, sponsorship, and evaluation; development of event timelines and event management skills; introduction to networking and interaction with sporting events. Recommendations: LEIS:3154 (169:154).
 
LEIS:3148 (169:148) Introduction to Personal Training3 s.h.
Basics of personal training, including establishing a personal training business, screening, and assessing clients; current issues and certifications.
 
LEIS:3149 (169:149) Coaching Interscholastic Athletics3 s.h.
Techniques and theories of coaching interscholastic athletes; ethics and legal responsibilities of coaching; coaching youth sports; leadership principles and techniques, organizational theories, assessment and implementation of coaching styles; trends, foundations, and principles related to basic philosophies of organized coaching; capstone course for certification of youth sports programs; credit and documentation for advanced coaching certification.
 
LEIS:3150 (169:150) Recreation Administration3 s.h.
Personnel, finance, budgets, liability, marketing.
 
LEIS:3151 (169:151) Liability in Recreation and Sport3 s.h.
Unintentional torts (negligence), civil liability, and criminal liability in recreation and sport settings; focus on community/commercial recreation and campus recreation settings. Requirements: completion of 30 s.h.
 
LEIS:3152 (169:152) Recreation and Sport Facility Management3 s.h.
Facilities management, personnel assignment and evaluation, fee structures, maintenance, programming, compliance with regulations and standards. Requirements: completion of 30 s.h.
 
LEIS:3153 (169:153) Sport Business Practices3 s.h.
Basic management skills for profit‑based recreation and sport businesses; operations, business plans, organizational behavior, risk management, inventory, purchasing, marketing. Requirements: completion of 30 s.h.
 
LEIS:3154 (169:154) Foundations of Event Management3 s.h.
Large, major special events, professional meetings, and conferences; development and planning, implementation of events, management and evaluation of events; development requirements of planning events, development strategies, budgeting, staffing requirements, resource allocation, site planning, basic risk management requirements, emergency procedures; event implementation policy and procedures; relationship to elements within development stages; event management and evaluation procedures.
 
LEIS:3156 (169:156) Design of Recreation Facilities3 s.h.
Horticulture, floriculture, landscape design, agronomy, turf management; their relation to planning and design of recreation and park areas and facilities. Requirements: completion of 30 s.h.
 
LEIS:3157 (169:157) Managerial Operations in Sport3 s.h.
Introduction to the operation of a private or nonprofit sport‑related business.
 
LEIS:3158 (169:158) Recreation and Sport Promotion3 s.h.
Foundations and principles of recreation sport promotion and sales operation; application of foundations and principles to sport and recreation industries; historical aspects; current and future trends of sport and recreation management as it relates to sales and promotions; sales management, marketing, financial/economic, legal, and ethical principles related to sport management. Requirements: completion of 30 s.h.
 
LEIS:3172 (169:172) Finance in Sport and Recreation3 s.h.
Capital funding and revenue acquisition for funding public and private sport and leisure service organizations; contemporary sport and leisure service; financial and economic issues.
 
LEIS:3175 (169:177) Business Development and Sales in Sport3 s.h.
Fundamentals of business development and sales management; incentivizing sports consumers, direct and indirect sales strategies, brand communications, atmospherics, technology in sports sales, ticket sales, licensing products, negotiating sports sponsorships, and brand building. Recommendations: health and human physiology major.
 
LEIS:3176 (169:179) Sports Analytics for Coaches, Managers, and Other Decision Makers3 s.h.
Data management, analytic models, and information systems; how sports analytics are used to make decisions for structuring athletic departments, develop in‑game competitive strategies, and improve player performance; analytic examples applied to professional sports, college sports, high school sports, and fantasy sports; experience with statistics or computer science not required.
 
LEIS:3178 (169:178) Communications and Public Relations in Sport3 s.h.
How public relations is used to promote service products, demonstrate social responsibility, and communicate with consumers and investors; campaigns, customer service, legal and ethical considerations in promoting service products, media events, information services, public relations in strategic management, atmospherics, critical service moment, social media. Recommendations: health and human physiology major.
 
LEIS:4196 (169:196) Recreation Sport Business Internship9 s.h.
Capstone course for the recreation sport business track; 360 contact hours of practical experience with a private or nonprofit recreation or sport‑related enterprise; supervision by an agency mentor and a university representative. Requirements: completion of all recreation sport business core courses, foundation courses, and elective concentration courses.
 
LEIS:4197 (169:197) Recreation and Sport Business Practicum1-3 s.h.
Educational opportunity involving a small group of students in a unique sport business experience; students serve as consultants for a sport or recreation organization; in‑class preparation prior to off‑campus work with designated agency; sport or recreation enterprise vary according to faculty expertise and agency availability. Prerequisites: LEIS:1060 (169:060), PSQF:1020 (07P:025), PSY:1001 (031:001), and SOC:1010 (034:001).
 
LEIS:4198 (169:198) NCAA Rules Compliance and Enforcement3 s.h.
Rules that govern NCAA athletics, rules compliance function on campuses of member institutions, and enforcement of rules by NCAA; essential legislation in NCAA Manual, including bylaws covering recruiting, eligibility, and amateurism; history of NCAA as related to organization's current structure and activities; capstone experience includes attendance at NCAA Regional Rules Seminar in Indiana and participation in educational sessions conducted by NCAA staff.
 

Therapeutic Recreation
 

LEIS:3160 (169:160) Introduction to Therapeutic Recreation3 s.h.
Lifestyles and barriers faced by persons with disabilities; basic aspects of the therapeutic recreation profession; skills used to establish therapeutic relationship; techniques used with patients; theoretical and conceptual bases for practice.
 
LEIS:3161 (169:161) Assessment and Evaluation in Therapeutic Recreation3 s.h.
Basic assessment psychometrics (e.g., reliability), standardized instrumentation and data collection (e.g., observation, self‑report), construction of instruments, data reduction. Prerequisites: LEIS:3160 (169:160).
 
LEIS:3162 (169:162) Therapeutic Recreation: Clientele3 s.h.
Developmental patterns of special populations; examination of specific interventions and research applied to specific cognitive, emotional, and physical impairments. Prerequisites: LEIS:3160 (169:160).
 
LEIS:3163 (169:163) Concepts and Issues in Therapeutic Recreation: Advancement of the Profession3 s.h.
Ethical, professional, and theoretical issues in delivery of therapeutic recreation services; impact of legislation, standards of practice, health care reform; application of research to practice and marketing services. Prerequisites: LEIS:3160 (169:160).
 
LEIS:3164 (169:164) Therapeutic Recreation: Rehabilitation3 s.h.
In‑depth review of therapeutic recreation techniques used in clinical and community rehabilitation; opportunities to use techniques with patients. Prerequisites: LEIS:3160 (169:160).
 
LEIS:3165 (169:165) Child Life: Methods and Materials3 s.h.
Interventions unique to child life practice (e.g., pain management, coping, preoperative play, terminal illness). Prerequisites: LEIS:1077 (169:077).
 
LEIS:3166 (169:166) Child Life: Seminar3 s.h.
Current issues and research in child life, expanding scope of service in child life. Prerequisites: LEIS:1077 (169:077).
 
LEIS:3168 (169:168) Aging and Leisure3 s.h.
Status of the well elderly in relation to retirement issues, use of free time, and factors that support leisure activity; leisure services in long‑term care. Same as ASP:3168 (153:168).
 
LEIS:3170 (169:170) Children and Health Care3 s.h.
Broad overview of issues and systemic approaches to working with children in a health care setting; practical and clinically‑based experiences for pediatric population; provision of health care services to patients and issues that affect them; models of intervention, ethical issues, case studies, and impact of cultural diversity on health care; for undergraduates who are interested in working with children in a health care setting.
 
LEIS:3171 (169:171) Child Life Practical Application3 s.h.
Overview of medical conditions and treatments commonly encountered by children and adolescents in health care settings; common pediatric sedation medications; sequence of medical procedures to understand how to provide procedural preparation and support; facilitate medical play with pediatric population.
 
LEIS:3173 (169:173) Work and Leisure in American Culture3 s.h.
Methods and insights of American studies and leisure studies applied to work/leisure relationship in American life; patterns and perceptions of work and leisure, leisure's share and potential; changing American values.
 
LEIS:3174 (169:174) Cultural Perspectives in Health Care3 s.h.
Health care beliefs related to various cultures and religions; focus on illness, hospitalization, treatment, death.
 
LEIS:3260 (169:175) Play and Childhoodarr.
Multiple levels of theories and current research on importance of play in child development; advocacy for importance and necessity of play in childhood that leads to well being and healthy lifestyles; practical‑ and theoretically‑based experiences; for students interested in working with children in health care, clinical, school, community, and family life settings. Prerequisites: LEIS:1077 (169:077).
 
LEIS:3261 (169:176) Inclusive Recreation3 s.h.
Laws pertaining to access to recreation and leisure opportunities for disabled persons in a community; evaluation of physical access to built environment; how social construction of disability can be a barrier to integrated leisure involvement; practical aspects of how to include disabled persons in community recreation and sport activities.
 
LEIS:4167 (169:167) Child Life Practicum1-2 s.h.
Experience observing and assisting child life staff members providing services to hospitalized children, under Certified Child Life Specialist supervision.
 
LEIS:4169 (169:169) Spring Break Child Life Experience1 s.h.
Practical experience with ill children, including a trip to the Give Kids the World village in Florida; documentation and engagement of course materials, experience working with ill children; students are assigned a specific diagnosis and present the diagnosis (appropriate statistics, effects of hospitalization, treatment, etc.) on child and family; coping strategies, appropriate methods of talking to and interacting with children and families, overview of child life in hospitals.
 
LEIS:4190 (169:190) Preinternship Seminar1 s.h.
Orientation to internship process.
 
LEIS:4191 (169:191) Therapeutic Recreation Internshiparr.
Practical field experience; direct leadership, program planning, administrative procedures. Prerequisites: LEIS:4190 (169:190).
 
LEIS:4192 (169:192) Child Life Internship12 s.h.
Minimum twelve‑week, 480‑contact‑hour, field experience under the supervision of a Certified Child Life Specialist. Prerequisites: LEIS:1061 (169:061), LEIS:1077 (169:077), LEIS:3160 (169:160), LEIS:3162 (169:162), LEIS:3165 (169:165), LEIS:3166 (169:166), and LEIS:4167 (169:167).
 
LEIS:4193 (169:193) Independent Studyarr.
Problem in a specific area.
 
LEIS:4194 (169:194) Honors Readingsarr.
 
LEIS:4195 (169:195) Honors Problemsarr.
 

Graduate

Athletic Training Program
 

ATEP:5010 (027:184) Seminar in Athletic Training1-4 s.h.
Educational issues faced by approved clinical instructors in athletic training education programs. Offered fall semesters.
 

Health and Human Physiology
 

HHP:5000 (027:200) Problemsarr.
 
HHP:5500 (027:270) Social Psychology of Sport and Physical Activity3 s.h.
Theoretical and applied bases of social psychology of sport and exercise; motivation, arousal, group processes related to sport, physical activity.
 
HHP:6000 (027:201) Researcharr.
 
HHP:6010 (027:301) Non-Thesis Seminar2 s.h.
For candidates for the M.S. without thesis. Offered spring semesters.
 
HHP:6130 (027:255) Advanced Skeletal Muscle Physiology1,3 s.h.
Skeletal muscle structure, contractile mechanisms, production of movement, biomechanical properties; adaptation to increased use, disuse, injury. Offered spring semesters. Prerequisites: HHP:3500 (027:130).
 
HHP:6150 (027:250) Advanced Clinical Exercise Physiology1,3 s.h.
Recent advances in exercise physiology for clinical populations; emphasis on acute and chronic responses to exercise in healthy aged adults and in patients with cardiac, vascular, pulmonary, and metabolic diseases; basic and intermediate electrocardiography (ECG), pathophysiology of disease process, clinical assessment of disease severity, diagnostic testing, acute exercise responses, and exercise rehabilitation. Prerequisites: HHP:3500 (027:130) and HHP:4410 (027:141). Recommendations: HHP:4460 (027:145).
 
HHP:6200 (027:238) Advanced Metabolic Exercise Testing and Prescription1,3 s.h.
Basic techniques in physical fitness assessment; prescription of exercise for healthy and unhealthy adults; promotion of physical activity within communities; knowledge and skill competencies required for certification as American College of Sports Medicine health fitness instructor. Prerequisites: HHP:2200 (027:039), and HHP:1300 (027:050) or HHP:3500 (027:130).
 
HHP:6210 (027:249) Epidemiology of Physical Activity3 s.h.
Physical activity/disease relationships examined through application of epidemiologic methods, including research design, interpretation of studies, selection of measures to fit research questions. Same as EPID:6245 (173:245).
 
HHP:6220 (027:244) Seminar in Health and Physical Activity Behavior3 s.h.
Health behavior theories and their relevance to individual, interpersonal, and community‑wide health promotion interventions.
 
HHP:6300 (027:314) Seminar in Motor Control1 s.h.
Current topics in neural control of movement, biomechanics, and rehabilitation sciences.
 
HHP:6400 (027:241) Integrative Physiology Seminar1 s.h.
Current topics in cardiovascular physiology, vascular biology, free radical biology.
 
HHP:6410 (027:240) Advanced Exercise Physiology1,3 s.h.
Mechanisms responsible for acute and chronic effects of exercise on different organ systems of the body. Offered fall semesters. Prerequisites: HHP:1300 (027:050) or HHP:3500 (027:130).
 
HHP:6460 (027:245) Advanced Cardiovascular Physiology1,3 s.h.
Structure and function of cardiovascular system; heart, microcirculation, hemodynamics, regional circulation, reflex integration, and regulation during physical stress. Prerequisites: HHP:3500 (027:130). Recommendations: calculus and physics.
 
HHP:6470 (027:248) Advanced Physiology of Aging1,3 s.h.
Effects of aging on cells, tissues, and organs; how aging influences function of major body organ systems and the whole organism; physiological mechanisms that underlie age‑related changes in body function and performance; integrative approach with focus on human aging. Prerequisites: HHP:1100 (027:053) and HHP:3500 (027:130).
 
HHP:6480 (027:265) Advanced Human Pharmacology1,3 s.h.
General pharmacology (administration, distribution, elimination of drugs, dose response curves, adverse effects, placebos, homeopathy); pharmacotherapy of selected human diseases, pathophysiologic aspects of disease, how different classes of drugs modify pathophysiologic effects to restore health or reduce impact of disease; focus on mechanisms of drug actions in humans; adverse effects, pharmacokinetic considerations, drug interactions; how to write prescriptions. Prerequisites: HHP:3500 (027:130).
 
HHP:6500 (027:296) Seminar in Health Promotion1 s.h.
Peer and faculty response to graduate student work addressing health promotion, physical activity and health outcomes, clinical exercise physiology; review and critique current literature; presentation of published work or in‑process projects; critical thinking, scientific writing, and oral communication skill development pertaining to health promotion.
 
HHP:6510 (027:268) Advanced Energy Metabolism in Health & Disease1,3 s.h.
Discussions of recent published, and/or seminal, state‑of‑the‑art papers on energy metabolism related to exercise and diet interventions in context of cardiovascular diseases, obesity, diabetes, and cancer. Prerequisites: HHP:3500 (027:130). Recommendations: HHP:4410 (027:141) and BIOL:2723 (002:114).
 
HHP:7000 (027:202) Practicum in College Teachingarr.
 
HHP:7300 (027:260) Advanced Neural Control of Posture and Movement1,3 s.h.
Neuroanatomical and neurophysiological bases of human motor control; mechanisms for locomotion and posture, control of arm and hand movements, role of sensory information. Offered spring semesters. Prerequisites: HHP:3500 (027:130). Requirements: anatomy or human physiology course.
 
HHP:7500 (027:404) Thesis: M.S.0-4 s.h.
 
HHP:7900 (027:405) Thesis: Ph.D.arr.
 

Sport and Recreation Management
 

LEIS:5065 (169:265) The Economy of Experience3 s.h.
In‑depth analysis of emerging experience economy; just as manufacturing sector of economy supersedes agriculture and service economy supersedes manufacturing, how experience economy is gaining ascendancy as the last, best hope for future economic growth; exploration of current research in positive psychology and sociologist findings on evolution of post‑materialist values as related to experience economy; evaluation of current trends; critical analysis and theory development; case studies; original research and investigation of novel marketing possibilities and experience design.
 
LEIS:5200 (169:200) Historical and Philosophical Perspectives on Leisure3 s.h.
Historical and philosophical origins of leisure studies; historical issues related to leisure ideas, such as shorter hours, share‑the‑work, utopian vision of a better society.
 
LEIS:6251 (169:251) Risk Management3 s.h.
Legal knowledge necessary for effective management of sport, recreation, and physical activity programs, avoidance of legal problems; strategies for addressing issues such as right to participate, liability for injuries, risk management; legal statutes that govern sport, health, recreation organizations.
 
LEIS:6252 (169:252) Economics and Financing3 s.h.
Economic issues for sport/leisure services in nonprofit, private/commercial, and public sectors; strategic financial analysis for the nonfinancial manager; principles, issues in financing sport/leisure organizations.
 
LEIS:6253 (169:253) Sport Administration3 s.h.
Overview of various segments that constitutes the role and function of a sport administrator (i.e., planning, organizing, leading, controlling); focus on ways in which sport administrators and their subsequent organizations influence and are influenced by the link between sport and globalization; sport administration encompassing services provided within an organizational context; administration viewed as the coordination of production and distribution of those services.
 
LEIS:6254 (169:254) Marketing and Sport Promotion3 s.h.
Overview of varied segments that constitutes sports business practice, including marketing, data‑based marketing, sales, promotion, sponsorship; varied segments that make up the sport industry, including the mass media, infrastructure, stadium building, consumer behavior; readings and discussions consider the development and structure of each segment, interactions between segments, planning, policy implications; focus on the United States, professional team sports, comparisons to other sports.
 
LEIS:7290 (169:290) Graduate Internship3-9 s.h.
Requirements: recreational sports management emphasis.
 
TR:3281 (169:181) Special Projects in Child Life Practice2 s.h.
Student directed and student led hospital camping experience for patients at the University of Iowa Children's Hospital; planning and preparing for a large function, planning and leading therapeutic activities, working directly with patients and their families, processing and discussion of experiences and concerns; practical and clinical‑based experiences for students interested in working with pediatric population in health care setting. Requirements: hospital orientation, patient confidentiality (HIPAA) training, and health screening.
 

Therapeutic Recreation
 

LEIS:5205 (169:205) Research Methods and Leisure Behavior3 s.h.
The scientific process: research designs for experiments and surveys, questionnaire construction, sampling theory, basic data analysis.
 
LEIS:6262 (169:262) Procedures in Therapeutic Recreation3 s.h.
Current issues in the field; application of business and research principles to therapeutic recreation practice and program administration.
 
LEIS:7289 (169:289) Graduate Practicum in Therapeutic Recreation3 s.h.
Field placement with a therapeutic recreation service delivery agency; meets NCTRC certification standards. Prerequisites: LEIS:3160 (169:160). Corequisites: LEIS:3163 (169:163) and LEIS:3164 (169:164).
 
LEIS:7291 (169:291) Problemsarr.
 
LEIS:7299 (169:299) Graduate Research Problemsarr.
 
LEIS:7398 (169:398) M.A. Thesis1-6 s.h.
 

Health and Physical Activity Skills

HPAS:1001 (28S:085) Alcohol and Your College Experience1 s.h.
Patterns of alcohol, drug use focused on college years; strategies for monitoring use, behavioral change plans for implementing lower‑risk drinking practices; for drinkers and non‑drinkers.
 
HPAS:1002 (28S:086) Tobacco and Your College Experience1 s.h.
Current behavior change theories related to tobacco use, cessation; nicotine replacement therapies (NRT), non‑NRT methods; triggers, relapse prevention, cognitive behavioral skills, support systems; for smokers and non‑smokers.
 
HPAS:1003 (28S:087) Resiliency and Your College Experience1 s.h.
Resiliency and psychological hardiness theories relevant to college life; resiliency and ability to cope with challenges; components of psychological fitness; skills for personal growth and emotional well‑being.
 
HPAS:1004 (28S:088) Food and Your College Experience1 s.h.
Sociocultural perspective on the forces that facilitate "junk" diets, particularly during young adulthood; basic components of nutrition; opportunity to develop skills in diet planning and healthy eating.
 
HPAS:1010 (28S:042) Personal Fitness1 s.h.
 
HPAS:1020 (28S:006) Core Strengthening1 s.h.
 
HPAS:1030 (28S:007) Aerobics1 s.h.
 
HPAS:1040 (28S:043) Pilates1 s.h.
 
HPAS:1060 (28S:061) Resistance Training1 s.h.
 
HPAS:1070 (28S:081) Weight Training I1 s.h.
 
HPAS:1075 (28S:082) Weight Training II1 s.h.
Prerequisites: HPAS:1070 (28S:081).
 
HPAS:1080 (28S:080) Olympic Weightlifting1 s.h.
Introduction to Olympic weightlifting exercises including snatch, clean and jerk, power snatch, and power clean. Prerequisites: HPAS:1070 (28S:081).
 
HPAS:1110 (28S:020) Fitness Walking1 s.h.
 
HPAS:1130 (28S:029) Jogging I: Beginners1 s.h.
 
HPAS:1135 (28S:030) Jogging II1 s.h.
 
HPAS:1210 (28S:047) Relaxation Techniques1 s.h.
 
HPAS:1220 (28S:021) Flexibility1 s.h.
 
HPAS:1230 (28S:025) Hatha Yoga1 s.h.
 
HPAS:1320 (28S:037) Lap Swimming I1 s.h.
 
HPAS:1325 (28S:038) Lap Swimming II1 s.h.
Prerequisites: HPAS:1320 (28S:037).
 
HPAS:1410 (28S:011) Badminton1 s.h.
 
HPAS:1430 (28S:045) Racquetball1 s.h.
 
HPAS:1440 (28S:066) Table Tennis1 s.h.
 
HPAS:1450 (28S:071) Tennis1 s.h.
 
HPAS:1530 (28S:077) Volleyball I1 s.h.
 
HPAS:1535 (28S:078) Volleyball II1 s.h.
Prerequisites: HPAS:1530 (28S:077).
 
HPAS:1549 (28S:049) Sand Volleyball1 s.h.
 
HPAS:1550 (28S:053) Slow-Pitch Softball1 s.h.
 
HPAS:1560 (28S:075) Ultimate Frisbee1 s.h.
 
HPAS:1610 (28S:052) Self Defense1 s.h.
 
HPAS:1620 (28S:031) Karate1 s.h.
 
HPAS:1630 (28S:033) Kick Boxing1 s.h.