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Geography

Chair

  • David A. Bennett

Professors

  • Marc P. Armstrong, David A. Bennett, George P. Malanson, R. Rajagopal, Ramanathan Sugumaran

Associate professors

  • Marc Linderman, Tyler Priest, Kathleen Stewart

Assistant professors

  • Margaret Carrel, Heather Sander, Eric Tate

Lecturer

  • Claire E. Pavlik

Adjunct assistant professors

  • Marian Muste, Mary P. Skopec, Peter J. Weyer

Professors emeriti

  • James B. Lindberg, Michael L. McNulty, David R. Reynolds, Gerard Rushton

Associate professor emeritus

  • Rebecca S. Roberts
Undergraduate majors: geography (B.A., B.S.); environmental planning and policy (B.A., B.S.)
Undergraduate minor: environmental policy and planning, geographic information science, geography
Graduate degrees: M.A. in geography; Ph.D. in geography
Web site: http://clas.uiowa.edu/geography/

Geography is concerned with place and environment and the ongoing processes of change within and between social and physical systems. Geography's importance to scholarly inquiry is rooted in the complexity of social and environmental problems. Three concepts at the core of the discipline—space, place, and scale—provide theoretical constructs and methodological tools for a science that investigates the complex character of social and environmental phenomena.

Geographers examine issues such as distribution and consumption of natural resources, air and water quality, climate changes and ecosystem dynamics, growth and development of urban areas, population dynamics, politics and practice of international development, and social justice. They view society and the environment as a physical/social/cultural system. They apply uniquely geographical perspectives and tools, as well as knowledge from other social and scientific disciplines, to analyze the emergent properties of these systems.

Department of Geography graduates find employment opportunities in government, nongovernmental organizations, and business. For example, many geographers are employed in resource management, urban and regional development, public health, and market area analysis. They analyze problems in the distribution and interactions among physical, ecological, social, and political systems.

Geography students acquire skills in computer-based cartography and geographic information systems (GIS) software used to investigate and solve many environmental and social problems. Opportunities for graduates with GIS training are growing rapidly in both private and governmental organizations.

The geography faculty has developed an undergraduate instructional program that serves students majoring or minoring in geography as well as students in other disciplines. Courses in geography are commonly required for students preparing to teach at the elementary and secondary school levels and for those who want to pursue careers in urban and regional planning. They also provide a background for many related professions, including law, health care, environmental or transportation engineering, and international business.

Geography students use the University's Geographic Information System Instructional Lab (GISIL) for GIS instruction and research. The lab is located in the Department of Geography; see "Facilities and Resources" later in this Catalog section.

The Department of Geography participates in a number of University of Iowa interdisciplinary programs that have international, area studies, urban, or environmental components. It also participates in the University's internship program for students; see "Internships" later in this Catalog section.

Undergraduate Programs

  • Major in geography (Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science)
  • Major in environmental policy and planning (Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science)
  • Minor in environmental policy and planning
  • Minor in geographic information science 
  • Minor in geography 

B.A. and B.S.: Geography

The Bachelor of Arts with a major in geography requires a minimum of 120 s.h., including at least 36-40 s.h. of work for the major. The Bachelor of Science with a major in geography requires a minimum of 120 s.h., including at least 44-48 s.h. of work for the major. Students choose one of four tracks: health and society, environmental studies, geographic information science (GIS), or sustainability. Credit required for the major depends on the student's choice of track.

The major in geography (either B.A. or B.S.) is appropriate preparation for advanced training or careers in geography. Students with strong interest in quantitative analysis and model building should pursue the Bachelor of Science and are encouraged to master an appropriate computer programming language.

All students majoring in geography complete a common set of foundation courses in addition to the requirements for their choice of track. Bachelor of Science students take additional mathematics course work. Students must complete the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences General Education Program.

Transfer students majoring in geography must earn a minimum of 15 s.h. for the major in residence at The University of Iowa. Consistent with the CLAS maximum hours rule, students may count no more than 50 s.h. earned in their major department toward graduation.

Common Requirements (B.A. and B.S.)

All geography majors must complete the following courses. Students may not use a course to fulfill more than one major requirement.

One of these:

044:001 (GEOG:1010) Introduction to Human Geography3 s.h.
044:010 (GEOG:1090) Globalization and Geographic Diversity3 s.h.

Both of these: 

044:003 (GEOG:1020) The Global Environment3 s.h.
044:005 (GEOG:1050) Foundations of GIS3 s.h.

One of these, in addition to any course required to fulfill a track requirement:

044:010 (GEOG:1090) Globalization and Geographic Diversity (if not chosen above)3 s.h.
044:011 (GEOG:2110) Population Geography3 s.h.
044:019 (GEOG:1070) Contemporary Environmental Issues3 s.h.
044:030 (GEOG:2910) The Global Economy3 s.h.
044:060 (GEOG:1060) Geography of Asia: From Japan to Pakistan3 s.h.
044:088 (GEOG:2950) Environmental Conservation3 s.h.

One of these (not required for GIS track students): 

044:105 (GEOG:3500) Introduction to Environmental Remote Sensing3 s.h.
044:109 (GEOG:3540) Introduction to Geographic Visualization3 s.h.
044:110 (GEOG:3520) GIS for Environmental Studies3 s.h.
044:112 (GEOG:3530) Mapping American Cities and Regions3 s.h.
044:142 (GEOG:4650) Simulation in Environmental Geography3 s.h.
044:180 (GEOG:4010) Field Methods in Physical Geography3 s.h.
044:181 (GEOG:4020) Field Methods: Mapping and Mobile Computing3 s.h.

One of these: 

044:150 (GEOG:4030) Senior Project Seminar3 s.h.
044:151 (GEOG:4990) Senior Thesis3 s.h.
044:199 (GEOG:4995) Honors Thesisarr.

Senior Project Seminar [044:150 (GEOG:4030)] is offered only in spring semesters. Students who choose 044:151 (GEOG:4990) Senior Thesis or 044:199 (GEOG:4995) Honors Thesis must make arrangements with a faculty advisor.

Statistics COURSES (B.A.)

Bachelor of Arts students must earn a minimum of 3 s.h. in statistics by completing one of the following courses or a statistics course equivalent to or numbered above one of these.

07P:143 (PSQF:5143)/22S:102 (STAT:5543) Introduction to Statistical Methods3 s.h.
22S:008 (STAT:1030) Statistics for Business4 s.h.
22S:025 (STAT:1020)/07P:025 (PSQF:1020) Elementary Statistics and Inference3 s.h.
22S:030 (STAT:2010) Statistical Methods and Computing3 s.h.
22S:039 (STAT:2020) Probability and Statistics for the Engineering and Physical Sciences3 s.h.
22S:101 (STAT:3510) Biostatistics3 s.h.
Statistics/Mathematics COURSES (B.S.)

Bachelor of Science students must earn a minimum of 9 s.h. in statistics/mathematics by completing one of the following options or courses equivalent to or numbered above these.

Option 1

This sequence:

07P:143 (PSQF:5143)/22S:102 (STAT:5543) Introduction to Statistical Methods3 s.h.
07P:243 (PSQF:6243)/22S:148 (STAT:6513) Intermediate Statistical Methods4 s.h.

Or this sequence:

171:161 (BIOS:5110) Introduction to Biostatistics3 s.h.
171:162 (BIOS:5120) Design and Analysis of Biomedical Studies3 s.h.

Or this sequence:

22S:030 (STAT:2010) Statistical Methods and Computing3 s.h.
22S:152 (STAT:3200) Applied Linear Regression3 s.h.

And one of these:

012:178 (GEOS:4870) Applied Geostatistics3 s.h.
22M:016 (MATH:1460) Calculus for the Biological Sciences5 s.h.
22M:017 (MATH:1380) Calculus and Matrix Algebra for Business4 s.h.
22M:025 (MATH:1850) Calculus I5 s.h.
22M:031 (MATH:1550) Engineering Mathematics I: Single Variable Calculus4 s.h.

Option 2

One of these:

22S:030 (STAT:2010) Statistical Methods and Computing3 s.h.
07P:143 (PSQF:5143)/22S:102 (STAT:5543) Introduction to Statistical Methods3 s.h.

And one of these sequences:

22M:015 (MATH:1440)-22M:016 (MATH:1460) Mathematics for the Biological Sciences
   and Calculus for the Biological Sciences
10 s.h.
22M:025 (MATH:1850)-22M:026 (MATH:1860) Calculus I
   and Calculus II
10 s.h.
22M:031 (MATH:1550)-22M:032 (MATH:1560) Engineering Mathematics I: Single Variable Calculus
   and Engineering Mathematics II: Multivariable Calculus
8 s.h.

Tracks (B.A. and B.S.)

All geography majors must complete one of the four tracks described below: health and society, environmental studies, geographic information science (GIS), or sustainability. Students should pay close attention to prerequisites for the upper-level courses in each track in order to develop a study plan that allows them to complete their major in a timely way.

Students in the health and society, environmental studies, or sustainability track who wish to gain additional experience in theory and application of GIS systems should take GIS-based courses offered by the Department of Geography, as described for each track below.

Students may use 044:197 (GEOG:3001) Special Topics to fulfill a track requirement if the course content is applicable.

Health and Society Track

The health and society track requires a minimum of 15 s.h. It is designed for students preparing for positions in government, nongovernment organizations, international development agencies, and business, especially those with a health focus. It also provides preparation for graduate study in geography or planning, or for professional programs such as law, business, or policy analysis. The track provides an understanding of disease, both infectious and chronic, in an environmental context and of health management, such as the location of health service facilities. The track also covers increasing globalization, including processes of urban and regional development or underdevelopment and their effects on health; the role of the natural environment in effecting health in different parts of the world; and the processes through which health policy decisions are reached. Course work in the track covers social and economic theories of location and regional formation, methods of spatial analysis and geographic modeling, global and regional political economy, and theories of community conflict and social change.

Students develop requisite skills in quantitative analysis and the development, management, and application of geographic information systems and computer methods. They have opportunities to work on applied problems, such as assessing disease hot spots, identifying the best locations for health service facilities, evaluating the impact of major projects, and forecasting health issues for the populations of small areas. The health and society track also provides opportunities for students interested in international development to examine competing theories intended to explain international and regional inequalities, and to investigate and evaluate the patterns and practice of development worldwide.

In addition to satisfying the common requirements for all geography majors, students in the health and society track complete a common track course (3 s.h.) and at least 12 s.h. of upper-level geography courses.

Common course—all health and society track students take this:

044:011 (GEOG:2110) Population Geography3 s.h.

Students choose a total of four upper-level courses (at least 12 s.h.) from the following lists, in consultation with their advisors. Those who wish to gain additional experience in theory and application of GIS systems should also take an additional 6 s.h. in GIS-based geography courses.

Two or three of these:

044:104 (GEOG:2410) Environment and Development3 s.h.
044:107 (GEOG:3070) Hungry Planet: Global Geographies of Food3 s.h.
044:112 (GEOG:3530) Mapping American Cities and Regions3 s.h.
044:131 (GEOG:3110) Geography of Health3 s.h.
044:133 (GEOG:3940) Transportation Economics3 s.h.
044:135 (GEOG:4930) Urban Geography3 s.h.
044:177 (GEOG:4770) Environmental Justice3 s.h.

One or two of these:

044:136 (GEOG:3920) Planning Livable Cities3 s.h.
044:137 (GEOG:4150) Health and Environment: GIS Applications3 s.h.
044:139 (GEOG:4570) Spatial Analysis and Location Models3 s.h.
044:175 (GEOG:3760) Hazards and Society3 s.h.
044:181 (GEOG:4020) Field Methods: Mapping and Mobile Computing3 s.h.
044:194 (GEOG:3910) Geographic Perspectives on Development3 s.h.
Environmental Studies Track

The environmental studies track requires a minimum of 15 s.h. It is designed for students interested in the interrelationships among social and natural processes that affect the environment. The track prepares students for careers or pursuit of personal interests in resource management, physical geography, climatology, environmental policy or law, global environmental change, sustainable development, or other complex environmental issues. Graduates may find employment in an environmental profession such as landscape ecology or climatology; environmental planning and regulation; or environmental law, policy, and politics.

The environmental studies track offers training in field observation, remote sensing, geographical information systems, quantitative analysis/computing, and cartographic representation. It also provides a sound foundation for graduate or professional-level studies in the natural or social aspects of the environment.

In addition to satisfying the common requirements for all geography majors, students in the environmental studies track complete a common track course (3 s.h.) and at least 12 s.h. of upper-level geography courses.

Common course—all environmental studies track students take this:

044:019 (GEOG:1070) Contemporary Environmental Issues3 s.h.

Students choose a total of four upper-level courses (at least 12 s.h.) from the following lists, in consultation with their advisors. Those who wish to gain additional experience in theory and application of GIS systems should take 044:110 (GEOG:3520) GIS for Environmental Studies and 044:128 (GEOG:4520) GIS for Environmental Studies: Applications, or another 6 s.h. in GIS-based geography courses.

Two or three of these:

044:088 (GEOG:2950) Environmental Conservation3 s.h.
044:101 (GEOG:2310) Climatology3 s.h.
044:103 (GEOG:2374) Biogeography3 s.h.
044:104 (GEOG:2410) Environment and Development3 s.h.
044:105 (GEOG:3500) Introduction to Environmental Remote Sensing3 s.h.
044:110 (GEOG:3520) GIS for Environmental Studies3 s.h.
044:111 (GEOG:2930) Water Resources3 s.h.
044:120 (GEOG:3780) U.S. Energy Policy in Global Context3 s.h.
044:177 (GEOG:4770) Environmental Justice3 s.h.

One or two of these:

044:123 (GEOG:3310) Landscape Ecology3 s.h.
044:125 (GEOG:4750) Environmental Impact Analysis4 s.h.
044:126 (GEOG:3320) Wetlands: Function, Geography, and Management3 s.h.
044:127 (GEOG:3750) Environmental Quality: Science, Technology, and Policy3 s.h.
044:128 (GEOG:4520) GIS for Environmental Studies: Applications3 s.h.
044:130 (GEOG:3560) Spatial Analyses of Wind Energy3 s.h.
044:136 (GEOG:3920) Planning Livable Cities3 s.h.
044:142 (GEOG:4650) Simulation in Environmental Geography3 s.h.
044:145 (GEOG:4500) Applications in Environmental Remote Sensing4 s.h.
044:174 (GEOG:4130) Health, Work, and the Environment3 s.h.
044:175 (GEOG:3760) Hazards and Society3 s.h.
044:179 (GEOG:3340) Ecosystem Services: Human Dependence on Natural Systems3 s.h.
044:180 (GEOG:4010) Field Methods in Physical Geography2-4 s.h.
044:186 (GEOG:3360) Soil Genesis and Geomorphology3 s.h.
044:188 (GEOG:4870) Applied Geostatistics3 s.h.
Geographic Information Science Track

The geographic information science track requires a minimum of 18-19 s.h. It is designed for students preparing for positions in government agencies, nongovernment organizations, international development agencies, and business. It also provides preparation for graduate study in geography, planning, and other disciplines. The track focuses on the design, implementation, and use of geographic information systems. Courses address how geographic data are acquired, stored, accessed, displayed, managed, and analyzed.

Students in the geographic information science track learn to address problems involved in modeling environmental systems, identifying the best locations for service facilities, assessing environmental impacts, and forecasting the populations of small areas. They use the department's Geographic Information Systems Instructional Lab (GISIL) extensively to develop expertise in using GIS software.

Course work in the track covers methods of spatial analysis and geographical modeling and involves database management and computer programming.

In addition to the common requirements for all geography majors, students in the geographic information science track complete a common track course (3-4 s.h.) and at least 15 s.h. of upper-level geography courses.

Common course—all GIS track students take one of these:

22C:005 (CS:1110) Introduction to Computer Science3 s.h.
or
22C:016 (CS:1210) Computer Science I: Fundamentals4 s.h.

Students choose a total of five upper-level courses (at least 15 s.h.) from the following lists, in consultation with their advisors (a total of four courses from the first two lists plus one course from the third list). GIS track students are encouraged to add breadth to their degree by taking additional upper-level courses in the department. Students interested in the application of GIS to environmental issues should select additional courses from the department's environmental studies area; those interested in socioeconomic issues should select additional courses from the department's health and society area.

Two or three of these:

044:105 (GEOG:3500) Introduction to Environmental Remote Sensing3 s.h.
044:109 (GEOG:3540) Introduction to Geographic Visualization3 s.h.
044:110 (GEOG:3520) GIS for Environmental Studies3 s.h.
044:112 (GEOG:3530) Mapping American Cities and Regions3 s.h.
044:142 (GEOG:4650) Simulation in Environmental Geography3 s.h.

One or two of these:

044:128 (GEOG:4520) GIS for Environmental Studies: Applications3 s.h.
044:130 (GEOG:3560) Spatial Analyses of Wind Energy3 s.h.
044:137 (GEOG:4150) Health and Environment: GIS Applications3 s.h.
044:139 (GEOG:4570) Spatial Analysis and Location Models3 s.h.
044:141 (GEOG:4580) Introduction to Geographic Databases3 s.h.
044:145 (GEOG:4500) Applications in Environmental Remote Sensing4 s.h.
044:146 (GEOG:3570) Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR): Principles and Applications3 s.h.

One of these:

044:130 (GEOG:3560) Spatial Analyses of Wind Energy3 s.h.
044:137 (GEOG:4150) Health and Environment: GIS Applications3 s.h.
044:175 (GEOG:3760) Hazards and Society3 s.h.
044:179 (GEOG:3340) Ecosystem Services: Human Dependence on Natural Systems3 s.h.
044:180 (GEOG:4010) Field Methods in Physical Geography2-4 s.h.
044:181 (GEOG:4020) Field Methods: Mapping and Mobile Computing3 s.h.
044:188 (GEOG:4870) Applied Geostatistics3 s.h.
Sustainability Track

The sustainability track requires a minimum of 18 s.h. It is designed for students interested in finding ways for people to live that do not threaten the survival of future generations.  It includes training in scientific and social scientific methods and requires students to look at the world on scales ranging from local to global. The sustainability track prepares students to be effective leaders and agents of change for sustainability in varied professions, such as academic researcher and teacher, technology specialist, grassroots advocate, government official, or corporate officer.

In addition to satisfying the common requirements for all geography majors, students in the sustainability track complete two common track courses, earning a minimum of 3 s.h. in 057:013 (ENGR:4013) Introduction to Sustainability. They also complete at least 12 s.h. of upper-level geography courses. Students may not major with this track and be awarded the Sustainability Certificate.

Common courses—all sustainability track students take both of these:

044:019 (GEOG:1070) Contemporary Environmental Issues3 s.h.
057:013 (ENGR:4013) Introduction to Sustainability (minimum of 3 s.h.)arr.

Students choose one upper-level course from each of the four groups below (at least 12 s.h.), in consultation with their advisors. Sustainability track students who wish to gain additional experience in theory and application of GIS systems should take 044:110 (GEOG:3520) GIS for Environmental Studies or 044:128 (GEOG:4520) GIS for Environmental Studies: Applications or another 6 s.h. in GIS-based geography courses.

Environment and human health—one of these:

044:088 (GEOG:2950) Environmental Conservation3 s.h.
044:103 (GEOG:2374) Biogeography3 s.h.
044:123 (GEOG:3310) Landscape Ecology3 s.h.
044:126 (GEOG:3320) Wetlands: Function, Geography, and Management3 s.h.
044:131 (GEOG:3110) Geography of Health3 s.h.
044:137 (GEOG:4150) Health and Environment: GIS Applications3 s.h.
044:179 (GEOG:3340) Ecosystem Services: Human Dependence on Natural Systems3 s.h.

Energy, climate, and the built environment—one of these:

044:101 (GEOG:2310) Climatology3 s.h.
044:111 (GEOG:2930) Water Resources3 s.h.
044:120 (GEOG:3780) U.S. Energy Policy in Global Context3 s.h.
044:130 (GEOG:3560) Spatial Analyses of Wind Energy3 s.h.
044:135 (GEOG:4930) Urban Geography3 s.h.
044:145 (GEOG:4500) Applications in Environmental Remote Sensing4 s.h.

Society and culture—one of these:

044:104 (GEOG:2410) Environment and Development3 s.h.
044:107 (GEOG:3070) Hungry Planet: Global Geographies of Food3 s.h.
044:175 (GEOG:3760) Hazards and Society3 s.h.
044:177 (GEOG:4770) Environmental Justice3 s.h.
044:194 (GEOG:3910) Geographic Perspectives on Development3 s.h.

Environment and public policy—one of these

044:110 (GEOG:3520) GIS for Environmental Studies3 s.h.
044:112 (GEOG:3530) Mapping American Cities and Regions3 s.h.
044:125 (GEOG:4750) Environmental Impact Analysis4 s.h.
044:127 (GEOG:3750) Environmental Quality: Science, Technology, and Policy3 s.h.
044:128 (GEOG:4520) GIS for Environmental Studies: Applications3 s.h.

 

B.A. and B.S.: Environmental Policy and Planning

The Bachelor of Arts with a major in environmental policy and planning requires a minimum of 120 s.h., including at least 40-41 s.h. of work for the major. The Bachelor of Science with a major in environmental policy and planning requires a minimum of 120 s.h., including at least 47-48 s.h. of work for the major. Students choose one of two tracks: planning or policy. Credit required for the major depends on the student's choice of track.

The major in environmental policy and planning concentrates on the social science and policy dimensions of environmental problems, which often are caused by people and may have significant economic effects. Environmental issues are embedded in a complex mesh of economics, politics, culture, and behavior. Planners and policy makers must understand the human dimensions of these factors in order to solve environmental problems.

Environmental policy and planning is an interdisciplinary major that draws courses from geography, anthropology, economics, political science, and other disciplines. Work for the major includes introductory courses, methods courses, intermediate courses, and a track. Students must maintain a g.p.a. of at least 2.00 in the major. Transfer students must complete at least 21 s.h. of work for the major in residence at The University of Iowa.

All students must complete the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences General Education Program

Students who earn a second major in anthropology, geography, or political science must complete a minimum of 12 s.h. of course work in the second major that they do not double-count toward the major in environmental policy and planning. The 12 s.h. of courses must be offered by the second major's administrative home: anthropology [prefix 113 (ANTH)], geography [prefix 044 (GEOG)], or political science [prefix 030 (POLI)]. This requirement applies whether students earn the same degree (B.A. or B.S.) with both majors or earn a B.A. with one major and a B.S. with the other. However, honors students in environmental policy and planning may count their honors thesis credit toward this 12 s.h. requirement.

The major in environmental policy and planning requires the following course work.

Common Requirements (B.A. and B.S.)

INTRODUCTORY COURSES (B.A. and B.S.)

All of these:

06E:001 (ECON:1100) Principles of Microeconomics4 s.h.
044:019 (GEOG:1070) Contemporary Environmental Issues3 s.h.
113:113 (ANTH:2261) Human Impacts on the Environment3 s.h.

One of these:

012:008 (GEOS:1080)/159:008 (ENVS:1080) Introduction to Environmental Science3-4 s.h.
044:003 (GEOG:1020) The Global Environment3 s.h.
METHODS COURSES (B.A.)

This course:

044:005 (GEOG:1050) Foundations of GIS3 s.h.

One of these:

22S:008 (STAT:1030) Statistics for Business4 s.h.
22S:025 (STAT:1020)/07P:025 (PSQF:1020) Elementary Statistics and Inference3 s.h.
22S:030 (STAT:2010) Statistical Methods and Computing3 s.h.
22S:039 (STAT:2020) Probability and Statistics for the Engineering and Physical Sciences3 s.h.
22S:101 (STAT:3510) Biostatistics3 s.h.
22S:102 (STAT:5543)/07P:143 (PSQF:5143) Introduction to Statistical Methods3 s.h.
METHODS COURSES (B.S.)

This sequence:

044:005 (GEOG:1050) Foundations of GIS3 s.h.
044:110 (GEOG:3520) GIS for Environmental Studies3 s.h.

And one of these sequences: 

22S:102 (STAT:5543) Introduction to Statistical Methods3 s.h.
22S:148 (STAT:6513) Intermediate Statistical Methods4 s.h.

 or

22S:030 (STAT:2010) Statistical Methods and Computing3 s.h.
22S:152 (STAT:3200) Applied Linear Regression3 s.h.
 INTERMEDIATE COURSES (B.A. AND B.S.) 

Both of these:

030:126 (POLI:3111) American Public Policy3 s.h.
044:120 (GEOG:3780) U.S. Energy Policy in Global Context3 s.h.

One of these:

113:114 (ANTH:3112) Environmentalisms3 s.h.
113:143 (ANTH:3103) Environment and Culture3 s.h.

Tracks (B.A. and B.S.)

Students choose either the planning track or the policy track and complete their track's required course work.

PLANNING TRACK

The planning track requires 12 s.h.; all students complete 06E:133 (ECON:3330) and choose three additional courses from the list below.

This course:

06E:133 (ECON:3330)/102:135 (URP:3135) Environmental and Natural Resource Economics3 s.h.

Three of these:

06E:135 (ECON:3340)/102:134 (URP:3134) Regional and Urban Economics3 s.h.
044:104 (GEOG:2410) Environment and Development3 s.h.
044:111 (GEOG:2930) Water Resources3 s.h.
044:177 (GEOG:4770) Environmental Justice3 s.h.
044:179 (GEOG:3340) Ecosystem Services: Human Dependence on Natural Systems3 s.h.
102:101 (URP:3001)/044:136 (GEOG:3920) Planning Livable Cities3 s.h.
102:133 (URP:3350)/06E:145 (ECON:3750)/044:133 (GEOG:3940) Transportation Economics3 s.h.
113:114 (ANTH:3112) Environmentalisms3 s.h.
113:143 (ANTH:3103) Environment and Culture3 s.h.
POLICY TRACK

The policy track requires 13 s.h.; all students complete 044:125 (GEOG:4750) and choose three additional courses from the list below.

This course:

044:125 (GEOG:4750)/102:125 (URP:4750) Environmental Impact Analysis4 s.h.

Three of these:

030:111 (POLI:3110) Local Politics3 s.h.
030:113 (POLI:3100) American State Politics3 s.h.
030:120 (POLI:3117) Public Administration and Bureaucratic Politics3 s.h.
030:121 (POLI:3122) Public Choice3 s.h.
030:125 (POLI:3118) Interest Groups3 s.h.
030:150 (POLI:3404) Public Policy Around the World3 s.h.
030:152 (POLI:3102) The U.S. Congress3 s.h.
030:171 (POLI:3204)/034:153 (SOC:3525) Public Opinion3 s.h.
044:127 (GEOG:3750) Environmental Quality: Science, Technology, and Policy3 s.h.
044:175 (GEOG:3760) Hazards and Society3 s.h.
113:124 (ANTH:3237)/024:124 (MUSM:3237) Politics of the Archaeological Past3 s.h.
113:170 (ANTH:3240) Cultural Resources Management Archaeology: Practice and Practicalities3 s.h.
175:101 (OEH:3210)/044:174 (GEOG:4130) Health, Work, and the Environment3 s.h.

Some of the courses listed above require prerequisite courses. 

B.A. or B.S. with Teacher Licensure

Geography majors interested in earning licensure to teach in elementary and/or secondary schools must complete the College of Education's Teacher Education Program (TEP) in addition to the requirements for the major and all requirements for graduation. The TEP requires several College of Education courses and student teaching. Contact the Office of Education Services for details.

Students must satisfy all degree requirements and complete Teacher Education Program licensure before degree conferral.

Four-Year Graduation Plan

The University of Iowa Four-Year Graduation Plan is being revised. The original Four-Year Graduation Plan continues to apply to students who have already signed it. Students who commit to the four-year plan beginning fall 2013 will be held to the revised requirements. For information about the plan, visit Four-Year Graduation Plan on the First-Year Experience web site.

Honors in the Geography Major

Geography students interested in pursuing study beyond the typical undergraduate level may work toward graduation with honors in the major. To graduate with honors, students must maintain a cumulative University of Iowa g.p.a. of at least 3.33 (contact the University of Iowa Honors Program for more information on university honors). They must be admitted to the honors program in geography by the first semester of their senior year and must maintain a g.p.a. of at least 3.33 in all geography courses.

Working under the direction of a faculty member, honors students conduct original research and then prepare and present an honors thesis based on their research. The thesis is reviewed by a committee of three faculty members. Students earn credit for their thesis by registering for 044:199 (GEOG:4995) Honors Thesis. The senior course 044:150 (GEOG:4030) Senior Project Seminar may be substituted for 044:199 (GEOG:4995), as long as the student continues work on the thesis under the direction of a faculty member.

Honors in the Environmental Policy and Planning Major

Environmental policy and planning students interested in pursuing study beyond the typical undergraduate level may work toward graduation with honors in the major. To graduate with honors, students must maintain a cumulative University of Iowa g.p.a. of at least 3.33 (contact the University of Iowa Honors Program for more information on university honors). They must be admitted to the honors program in environmental policy and planning by the first semester of their senior year, at the latest, and must maintain a g.p.a. of at least 3.33 in all courses required in the major. 

Working under the direction of a faculty member, honors students conduct original research and then prepare and present an honors thesis based on their research. The thesis must be approved by a committee of at least three faculty members. Students earn credit for their thesis by registering for 044:199 (GEOG:4995) Honors Thesis or 030:186 (POLI:4601) Honors Senior Thesis, or 113:186 (ANTH:4995) Honors Research Seminar and 113:176 (ANTH:4996) Honors Research.

Minor in Environmental Policy and Planning

The minor in environmental policy and planning requires a minimum of 18 s.h., including 12 s.h. in 100-level courses taken at The University of Iowa. Students must maintain a g.p.a. of at least 2.00 in the minor. Only 6 s.h. can count toward the minor in environmental policy and planning and any major or minor in the Departments of Anthropology, Geography, or Political Science. Course work in the minor may not be taken pass/nonpass. For help in selecting courses, contact the department secretary to request assignment of a minor advisor.

CORE COURSES

All of these:

030:126 (POLI:3111) American Public Policy3 s.h.
044:019 (GEOG:1070) Contemporary Environmental Issues3 s.h.
113:113 (ANTH:2261) Human Impacts on the Environment3 s.h.

Three courses are required from either the Planning or Policy track. 

Planning Track

Planning track students select three courses from these:

044:104 (GEOG:2410) Environment and Development3 s.h.
044:111 (GEOG:2930) Water Resources3 s.h.
044:177 (GEOG:4770) Environmental Justice3 s.h.
044:179 (GEOG:3340) Ecosystem Services: Human Dependence on Natural Systems3 s.h.
102:101 (URP:3001)/044:136 (GEOG:3920) Planning Livable Cities3 s.h.
102:133 (URP:3350)/06E:145 (ECON:3750)/044:133 (GEOG:3940) Transportation Economics3 s.h.
102:134 (URP:3134)/06E:135 (ECON:3340) Regional and Urban Economics3 s.h.
102:135 (URP:3135)/06E:133 (ECON:3330) Environmental and Natural Resource Economics3 s.h.
113:114 (ANTH:3112) Environmentalisms3 s.h.
113:143 (ANTH:3103) Environment and Culture3 s.h.

Policy Track

Policy students select three courses from these:

030:111 (POLI:3110) Local Politics3 s.h.
030:113 (POLI:3100) American State Politics3 s.h.
030:120 (POLI:3117) Public Administration and Bureaucratic Politics3 s.h.
030:121 (POLI:3122) Public Choice3 s.h.
030:125 (POLI:3118) Interest Groups3 s.h.
030:150 (POLI:3404) Public Policy Around the World3 s.h.
030:152 (POLI:3102) The U.S. Congress3 s.h.
030:171 (POLI:3204)/034:153 (SOC:3525) Public Opinion3 s.h.
044:120 (GEOG:3780)/152:178 (GHS:3780) U.S. Energy Policy in Global Context3 s.h.
044:125 (GEOG:4750)/102:125 (URP:4750) Environmental Impact Analysis4 s.h.
044:127 (GEOG:3750) Environmental Quality: Science, Technology, and Policy3 s.h.
044:175 (GEOG:3760)/152:180 (GHS:3760) Hazards and Society3 s.h.
113:124 (ANTH:3237)/024:124 (MUSM:3237) Politics of the Archaeological Past3 s.h.
113:170 (ANTH:3240) Cultural Resources Management Archaeology: Practice and Practicalities3 s.h.
175:101 (OEH:3210)/044:174 (GEOG:4130) Health, Work, and the Environment3 s.h.

 

Minor in Geographic Information Science

Geographic Information Science (GISci) is the study of geography through the lens of digital technology. This field comprises the use of geographic information systems (an assemblage of computer-bases technologies designed to facilitate the capture, organization, analysis, and display of geographic data), remote sensing (primarily interpretation of satellite imagery), and spatial modeling (viewing, analyzing, and mapping spatial data) to examine geographic patterns and processes and research on the nature, development, and use of these tools.

The minor in geographic information science requires a minimum of 15 s.h. in geography courses, including 12 s.h. in 100-level courses taken at The University of Iowa. Students must maintain a g.p.a. of at least 2.00 in the minor. Course work in the minor may not be taken pass/nonpass. For help in selecting courses, contact the department secretary to request assignment of a minor advisor.

The minor consists of a core course, a mid-level course in each of three specializations within GISci, and an advanced course that builds on one of the three mid-level courses.

Core Course

The following is required:

044:005 (GEOG:1050) Foundations of GIS3 s.h.
Mid-Level Courses  

All of these:

044:105 (GEOG:3500) Introduction to Environmental Remote Sensing3 s.h.
044:109 (GEOG:3540) Introduction to Geographic Visualization3 s.h.
044:110 (GEOG:3520) GIS for Environmental Studies3 s.h.
Advanced Courses

One of these:

044:128 (GEOG:4520) GIS for Environmental Studies: Applications3 s.h.
044:137 (GEOG:4150) Health and Environment: GIS Applications3 s.h.
044:139 (GEOG:4570) Spatial Analysis and Location Models3 s.h.
044:141 (GEOG:4580) Introduction to Geographic Databases3 s.h.
044:142 (GEOG:4650) Simulation in Environmental Geography3 s.h.
044:145 (GEOG:4500) Applications in Environmental Remote Sensing4 s.h.
044:146 (GEOG:3570) Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR): Principles and Applications3 s.h.
044:181 (GEOG:4020) Field Methods: Mapping and Mobile Computing3 s.h.

Minor in Geography

The minor in geography requires a minimum of 15 s.h. in geography courses, including 12 s.h. in 100-level courses taken at The University of Iowa. Students must maintain a g.p.a. of at least 2.00 in the minor. Course work in the minor may not be taken pass/nonpass. Students are encouraged to concentrate their course work in tracks—health and society, environmental studies, geographic information science, or sustainability (see "B.A. and B.S.: Geography" above). For help in selecting courses, contact the department secretary to request assignment of a minor advisor.

Courses for Nonmajors

Students in other majors may include geography courses in their study programs to satisfy requirements of the General Education Program. Three General Education areas include geography courses, as follows (several courses are approved for both the International and Global Issues area and the Social Sciences area).

International and Global Issues:

044:010 (GEOG:1090) Globalization and Geographic Diversity3 s.h.
044:019 (GEOG:1070) Contemporary Environmental Issues3 s.h.
044:030 (GEOG:2910) The Global Economy3 s.h.
044:060 (GEOG:1060) Geography of Asia: From Japan to Pakistan3 s.h.
044:161 (GEOG:2404) African Development3 s.h.

Natural Sciences:

044:003 (GEOG:1020) The Global Environment3 s.h.

Social Sciences:

044:001 (GEOG:1010) Introduction to Human Geography3 s.h.
044:010 (GEOG:1090) Globalization and Geographic Diversity3 s.h.
044:011 (GEOG:2110) Population Geography3 s.h.
044:019 (GEOG:1070) Contemporary Environmental Issues3 s.h.
044:030 (GEOG:2910) The Global Economy3 s.h.
044:161 (GEOG:2404) African Development3 s.h.

Nonmajors also may choose geography courses as electives.

Graduate Programs

  • Master of Arts in geography
  • Doctor of Philosophy in geography

In addition to offering graduate degree programs, the department administers the geoinformatics subtrack of the graduate Certificate in Informatics; see Informatics in the Catalog (Graduate College).

Department of Geography graduate programs focus on investigating the environmental consequences of human decisions on local, regional, and global scales. Central to the department's studies are geographical information science and the theories and models of environmental and social sciences. Within this broad domain, the department is developing strengths in environmental justice, environmental modeling, GIScience and GIS, land use and its environmental consequences, and health geography.

The Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy programs prepare students to carry on creative and productive research in selected areas of geography. University of Iowa graduates hold positions on college and university faculties, in private research organizations, and in business and government.

The department provides opportunities for graduate students to gain practical teaching experience through service as departmental teaching assistants or graduate instructors.

Graduate students present research papers at conferences and have regularly won awards. Students are involved in faculty research that leads to coauthored publications; they also publish their own. Graduate students compete successfully for intramural and extramural funding for graduate education and research.

Master of Arts

The Master of Arts program in geography is designed to be completed in four semesters. An M.A. with thesis requires a minimum of 30 s.h. of graduate credit, of which 15 s.h. must be earned in courses numbered 200 (GEOG 5000) and above. Six s.h. may be thesis hours, and 2 s.h. can be 044:350 (GEOG:7000) Geography Colloquium. Students may earn more than the required credit in completing the degree, using the additional work to increase their breadth of knowledge in geography and to tailor their study programs to their individual interests.
A professional M.A., designed to be completed by course work only is also available. This program builds skills across a range of topics in our department in the first year and further develops these in particular application areas in the second year. It requires a minimum of 32 s.h. of graduate work, of which 15 s.h. must be earned in courses numbered 200 (GEOG 5000) and above.
Graduate students demonstrate competence by completing appropriate course work and completing and defending an M.A. thesis, or having a portfolio of finished work reviewed (professional M.A.), completing an M.A. exam, or completing the Ph.D. comprehensive exams.
For detailed information about M.A. requirements, see the Manual for Graduate Degree Requirements, Department of Geography; contact the Department of Geography.

Doctor of Philosophy

The Doctor of Philosophy program in geography requires 72 s.h. of graduate credit and is designed to be completed in four or five years. The degree prepares students for college and university teaching and for advanced research. It provides study programs that lead to broad knowledge of a field of geography and its literature and to special expertise in a subfield.

Students may enter the Ph.D. program upon completing an undergraduate degree or with advanced standing corresponding to previous graduate education.

All Ph.D. students take the following courses. They take 044:350 (GEOG:7000) Geography Colloquium (1 s.h.) each semester they are in residence. 

044:210 (GEOG:5010) Fundamentals of Geography3 s.h.
044:211 (GEOG:5050) Research and Writing in Geography3 s.h.
044:350 (GEOG:7000) Geography Colloquium (taken each semester)1 s.h.
Two courses in geography numbered above 044:200 (GEOG:5001)6 s.h.
Two research seminars chosen from 044:315 (GEOG:6500) through 044:319 (GEOG:6900) (3 s.h. each)6 s.h.
 
Doctoral students will undertake and complete a set of research milestones as well as written and oral comprehensive examinations. The comprehensive examination covers the student's concentration area and his or her general field in the discipline. After obtaining the dissertation advisor's approval, the student submits a dissertation proposal to the dissertation committee for critical comments and approval. Once the dissertation is completed, an oral defense of the dissertation will be held.
For detailed information about Ph.D. requirements, see the Manual for Graduate Degree Requirements, Department of Geography; contact the Department of Geography.

 

Admission

Applicants must meet the admission requirements of the Graduate College; see the Manual of Rules and Regulations of the Graduate College or the Graduate College section of the Catalog.

A bachelor's degree with a major in geography is not required for admission to graduate study in geography, but applicants must have an undergraduate background relevant to the field. Strength in social or environmental science and interest in exploring the regional and spatial perspectives that characterize modern geography are important in admission decisions. Depending on their prior training, graduate students may be required to take courses that are prerequisites for course work in their chosen area of graduate study; credit earned in prerequisites does not count toward the graduate degree.

Application materials include an undergraduate transcript with grade-point average, scores on the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) General Test, three letters of recommendation, and an essay in which the applicant states his or her reasons for wanting to study geography at The University of Iowa.

Applicants whose first language is not English must take the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). Their scores must be sent to the University's Office of Admissions.

New graduate students whose first language is not English are required to take a speaking proficiency test when they arrive at the University; eventually they take the English Language Performance Test (ELPT). Students must be fully certified by the ELPT before they begin their fourth semester in order to be considered for funding in succeeding semesters. Students who do not pass the tests are required to take Teaching Assistant Preparation in English (TAPE) courses until they have achieved proficiency in spoken English.

Financial Support

A number of graduate teaching and research assistantships are available. In addition, outstanding applicants and underrepresented minorities are eligible for several fellowships. Awards are based on merit. In making awards, the department pays particular attention to grade-point average, especially for the junior and senior years; score on the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) General Test; letters of recommendation; and fit of the student's objectives with department specializations. Applications for graduate appointments must be received by February 1. Applications for fellowships are due by January 15.

Internships

The Department of Geography is a participant in the University's internship program, which provides opportunities for both undergraduate and graduate students to participate in paid and unpaid activities related to their academic programs. The Pomerantz Career Center works with students to develop appropriate internships.

Facilities and Resources

The department houses three geographic information computational laboratories, which support a variety of GIS software packages, including the latest software from ESRI (ArcGIS) and Erdas (Imagine) as well as open-source software.

The University's Geographic Information Systems Instructional Lab (GISIL) is located in the Department of Geography. The lab is a center for teaching GIS as well as a place where students conduct geographic and GIS-related research. It is equipped with 25 networked student workstations, instructional support technology (e.g., CRT projection), and a suite of peripherals.

Environmental modeling and GIS research laboratories contain state-of-the-art machines. The department provides Windows and Linux platforms, digitizers, scanners, plotters, and printers. Projects requiring massive storage have access to the advanced GIS and modeling facility in the Center for Global and Regional Environmental Research. The University of Iowa is a charter member of Internet2, with a high-performance network link to the Department of Geography. The University also is a member of the University Consortium on Geographic Information Science.

To aid studies of water resources and physical geography, the department has a laboratory for analysis of vegetation, sediment, soil, water quality, and tree rings, and a variety of field equipment, including portable meteorological stations and data loggers.

Faculty and graduate students participate in multidisciplinary working groups through the University's Program in Applied Mathematical and Computational Sciences, Center for Global and Regional Environmental Research, Center for Health Effects of Environmental Contamination, International Programs, Institute for Rural and Environmental Health, Iowa Quaternary Studies Group, and Public Policy Center.

The University's Main Library has a collection of more than 115,500 maps, 3,600 atlases and reference works, and around 100,000 aerial photographs, primarily of Iowa.

Courses

Primarily for Undergraduates

044:001 (GEOG:1010) Introduction to Human Geography3 s.h.
Application of geographic principles to contemporary social, economic, and political problems; urban growth; problems of the ghetto; diffusion of innovations; territoriality and perception. GE: Social Sciences.
 
044:003 (GEOG:1020) The Global Environment3 s.h.
Climate change and interactions between atmosphere and geological, hydrological, and biological systems; response of these systems to climate change and how such responses affect atmospheric processes through feedbacks (e.g., flows of energy, cycles of carbon and water); how geographic differences in such interactions create ecological patterns around the world (e.g., rainforests, prairies). GE: Natural Sciences without Lab.
 
044:004 (GEOG:1021) The Global Environment Lab1 s.h.
Laboratory complement to 044:003 (GEOG:1020). Corequisites: 044:003 (GEOG:1020), if not taken as a prerequisite. GE: Natural Sciences Lab only.
 
044:005 (GEOG:1050) Foundations of GIS3 s.h.
Cartography, map analysis, and geographic information systems; map projections and scale; data collection, remote sensing, and GPS; data structures and organization; cartometry; symbolization and visualization.
 
044:010 (GEOG:1090) Globalization and Geographic Diversity3 s.h.
Problems of the global system and ways to address them; global economy and environment, state and security, social justice and human rights. GE: International and Global Issues; Social Sciences.
 
044:011 (GEOG:2110) Population Geography3 s.h.
Spatial considerations of population growth and distribution; minorities within a population; poverty; housing; social organization and disorganization; social systems, including education, religion, recreation, medical and social services; diffusion of ideas and traits over space. GE: Social Sciences.
 
044:019 (GEOG:1070) Contemporary Environmental Issues3 s.h.
Political, economic, cultural, technologic, ecological, and ethical issues associated with natural resource and environmental problems, including population, global climate change, food production, tropical deforestation, soil erosion, waste management. GE: International and Global Issues; Social Sciences.
 
044:029 (GEOG:1000) First-Year Seminar1 s.h.
Small discussion class taught by a faculty member; topics chosen by instructor; may include outside activities (e.g., films, lectures, performances, readings, visits to research facilities). Requirements: first‑ or second‑semester standing.
 
044:030 (GEOG:2910) The Global Economy3 s.h.
Location and spatial organization of the world's major types of economies; agriculture, energy and minerals, manufacturing, transportation; trade and service centers. GE: International and Global Issues; Social Sciences.
 
044:055 (GEOG:2130) World Cities3 s.h.
Exploration of important urban centers, past and present; focus on why cities exist, how they are organized; key social, economic, and cultural roles played in human societies; examination of different historical eras, including ancient, medieval, and modern; analysis of urban physical structures and spatial organization, how they reflect societies that created them; case study cities include Ancient Rome, medieval Vienna, baroque Versailles, mercantile Amsterdam and London, major contemporary industrial and financial centers.
 
044:060 (GEOG:1060) Geography of Asia: From Japan to Pakistan3 s.h.
Varied cultures and environments of Asia; exploration of physical and cultural landscapes of region; processes of development in context of globalization and regionalism; population growth; rise of megacities and urban agglomerations; ethnic, religious and political diversity and tensions; colonial legacies and emerging economies; food and water scarcity; climate change and biodiversity; natural hazards; migration and double burden of disease. GE: International and Global Issues.
 
044:088 (GEOG:2950) Environmental Conservation3 s.h.
Scientific foundations of biological conservation; strategies used to better connect conservation practice with needs of a growing human population. Prerequisites: 044:003 (GEOG:1020) or 159:008 (ENVS:1080), and 044:019 (GEOG:1070).
 
044:100 (GEOG:2990) Readings for Undergraduatesarr.
Supervised readings in geography.
 

For Undergraduate and Graduate Students

044:101 (GEOG:2310) Climatology3 s.h.
Boundary layer processes that drive atmospheric dynamics; exchanges of energy and water at simple and complex surfaces; global climate change records, theories, models; impacts of climate on society. Prerequisites: 044:003 (GEOG:1020). Same as 012:104 (GEOS:2310).
 
044:102 (GEOG:3020) Earth Surface Processes3 s.h.
Basic geomorphic and environmental processes that shape the earth's surface; emphasis on erosion, transport, deposition by land mass movement (creep, landslides, earth flow), fluid agents (wind, water, ice); methods used to study these processes. Prerequisites: 012:005 (GEOS:1050) or 012:008 (GEOS:1080) or 044:003 (GEOG:1020) or 159:008 (ENVS:1080). Same as 012:102 (GEOS:3020), 159:102 (ENVS:3020).
 
044:103 (GEOG:2374) Biogeography3 s.h.
Patterns of plant and animal distribution and their interpretation; historical geography including glaciation and plate tectonics; ecological geography, including physical factors (e.g., climate and geology); applications to conservation in diverse regions. Prerequisites: 002:001 (BIOL:1261) or 002:002 (BIOL:1141) or 002:011 or 002:022 (BIOL:1370) or 002:032 (BIOL:1412) or 044:003 (GEOG:1020). Same as 002:103 (BIOL:2374).
 
044:104 (GEOG:2410) Environment and Development3 s.h.
Environmental impacts of industrial and rural development explored through Third World case studies (Latin America, Africa, South and East Asia); environmental degradation from perspectives of political economy and ecology; class, gender, and indigenous peoples' issues; industry‑agriculture linkages.
 
044:105 (GEOG:3500) Introduction to Environmental Remote Sensing3 s.h.
Basic concepts and principles of remote sensing; sources of data; georegistration; digital processing and classification of remotely sensed images for extraction of environmental information; linkage of remote sensing techniques with GIS analysis.
 
044:106 (GEOG:3505) Foundations of GIS3 s.h.
Cartography, map analysis, and geographic information systems; map projections and scale; data collection, remote sensing, GPS; data structures and organization; cartometry; symbolization and visualization.
 
044:107 (GEOG:3070) Hungry Planet: Global Geographies of Food3 s.h.
Societal and environmental implications of past, current, and future global food supply examined from a geographical perspective; focus on questions of who eats what, where, and why; transformative history of agriculture, modern agribusiness and alternative food supplies, geopolitical implications of food production, food scarcity and rising food costs, urban versus rural agriculture, the obesity epidemic versus malnutrition, and the future of food. Same as 152:107 (GHS:3070).
 
044:109 (GEOG:3540) Introduction to Geographic Visualization3 s.h.
Basic concepts and techniques that underlie cartographic representation and the broader field of geographic visualization; digital cartographic practices; how scientific visualization, information visualization, and user interface design contribute to geographic visualization; map symbolization, scale and generalization, animation and dynamic map design, multimedia, virtual and mixed environments, interfaces for GIS; experience applying cartographic and visualization techniques. Prerequisites: 044:005 (GEOG:1050).
 
044:110 (GEOG:3520) GIS for Environmental Studies3 s.h.
Methods of managing and processing geographic information for environmental analysis; basic concepts, structures, theories of geographic information system (GIS), basic analytical techniques, and hands‑on experience in GIS operations. Prerequisites: 044:005 (GEOG:1050).
 
044:111 (GEOG:2930) Water Resources3 s.h.
Introduction to science and policy issues affecting water resources management in the U.S; how intersection of people, climate, technology, and geography affects quality, availability, and demand for freshwater resources; basic hydrological processes; water needs of people and ecosystems; influence of regulations and management on water quality, availability, and hazards; historical and contemporary developments in management of water, including international conflicts.
 
044:112 (GEOG:3530) Mapping American Cities and Regions3 s.h.
Foundation concepts for GIS‑based analysis of urban, social, and economic data for the United States; geo‑referenced sources of U.S. national and state data; application to contemporary social issues. Prerequisites: 044:005 (GEOG:1050).
 
044:120 (GEOG:3780) U.S. Energy Policy in Global Context3 s.h.
Historical and contemporary aspects of U.S. governmental planning and policy on a wide range of energy issues in global context. Prerequisites: 044:019 (GEOG:1070), and 044:003 (GEOG:1020) or 012:008 (GEOS:1080). Same as 152:178 (GHS:3780).
 
044:123 (GEOG:3310) Landscape Ecology3 s.h.
Effects of spatial pattern on spatial processes in ecology; characteristics of matrix, patch, corridor; fragmentation, deforestation, habitat loss; spatial flows of energy, matter, genetic information; relationship to human impact, global climate change. Requirements: 044:103 (GEOG:2374) or a 100‑level course in ecology.
 
044:125 (GEOG:4750) Environmental Impact Analysis4 s.h.
Environmental impact assessment methodologies; emphasis on cost‑benefit‑risk, cost‑effectiveness and incremental analysis, and overlay and graphic techniques; optimal resource use, system simulation; field trips to local environmental control facilities. Prerequisites: 044:019 (GEOG:1070). Same as 102:125 (URP:4750).
 
044:126 (GEOG:3320) Wetlands: Function, Geography, and Management3 s.h.
Hydrological, geomorphological, and ecological processes and their interaction in wetlands; geographic differences in wetlands based on climate and hydrology; wetlands, lakes, and rivers; role of wetlands in drainage basin hydrology and flooding; values and valuation of wetlands; wetland law and wetland delineation; wetlands and water resources. Prerequisites: 044:101 (GEOG:2310) or 044:103 (GEOG:2374). Same as 012:126 (GEOS:3260).
 
044:127 (GEOG:3750) Environmental Quality: Science, Technology, and Policy3 s.h.
Geographical perspectives in the study and interpretation of chemicals in the environment; environmental standards under existing laws; local, regional, national, international case studies in environment and health; socioeconomic and institutional considerations in designing environmental protection strategies. Prerequisites: 22S:025 (STAT:1020).
 
044:128 (GEOG:4520) GIS for Environmental Studies: Applications3 s.h.
Applications of geographic information system (GIS) techniques in environmental change analysis (especially land use/cover change), environmental assessment, hazard/risk analysis, environmental decision making. Prerequisites: 044:110 (GEOG:3520).
 
044:130 (GEOG:3560) Spatial Analyses of Wind Energy3 s.h.
Introduction to underlying processes, measurement methods, and spatial analyses related to wind energy; siting criteria, techniques for data collection and analysis, GIS‑based approaches for suitability studies.
 
044:131 (GEOG:3110) Geography of Health3 s.h.
Provision of health care in selected countries, with particular reference to the Third World; focus on problems of geographical, economic, cultural accessibility to health services; disease ecology, prospective payment systems, privatization, medical pluralism. Same as 152:131 (GHS:4111).
 
044:133 (GEOG:3940) Transportation Economics3 s.h.
Overview of transportation markets—intercity, rural, urban; transportation modes—rail, highway, air, water, pipeline, transit; issues in finance, policy, planning, management, physical distribution, and environmental, economic, and safety regulation. Recommendations: 06E:001 (ECON:1100) and 06E:002 (ECON:1200). Same as 102:133 (URP:3350), 06E:145 (ECON:3750).
 
044:135 (GEOG:4930) Urban Geography3 s.h.
Central ideas of modern urban geography, their links to social theory; focus on interrelation between social change, urban environment; evolution of urban systems, emergence of the capitalist city, urban social and residential differentiation, local politics of uneven development.
 
044:136 (GEOG:3920) Planning Livable Cities3 s.h.
Development of livable cities in the United States; economic, physical, environmental, and political forces that shape their growth; impact of planning, how it shapes the future of cities. Same as 102:101 (URP:3001).
 
044:137 (GEOG:4150) Health and Environment: GIS Applications3 s.h.
Applications of GIS and spatial analysis for studying health outcomes and exposure to environmental contaminants at different geographical scales. Same as 152:139 (GHS:4150).
 
044:139 (GEOG:4570) Spatial Analysis and Location Models3 s.h.
Application of location models within GIS environments to support decision making; small area demographic forecasting, location‑allocation models, regionalization problems, shortest path models, other spatial analysis methods used to support spatial decisions. Prerequisites: 044:005 (GEOG:1050).
 
044:140 (GEOG:5129) Information Systems for Resource Management3 s.h.
Understanding and managing natural and engineered resources requiring data‑reach foundation; management of data; complex data‑driven technologies integrated into data and information systems (DIS); hands‑on opportunity to develop or use capabilities of DIS for study or research area of interest (science, engineering, industrial operation); wind power generation, an emerging field in Iowa, used as a case study for illustrating key DIS components, links, and functionalities. Same as 056:129 (IE:5129), 058:129 (ME:5129), 053:129 (CEE:5129), 055:129 (ECE:5129).
 
044:141 (GEOG:4580) Introduction to Geographic Databases3 s.h.
Fundamentals of database design and use for geographic or environmental domains; major database models and how they support geographic data; introduction to SQL for formulating database queries; experience using software for applying key database concepts. Prerequisites: 044:005 (GEOG:1050).
 
044:142 (GEOG:4650) Simulation in Environmental Geography3 s.h.
How computer simulations are used in environmental studies, with focus on landscape ecology (spatial patterns of organisms and ecosystems); basics of performing simulations; principles and applications of simulation through readings and performing simulations; frontiers of simulation use in the field; hands‑on experience writing computer simulations that capture environmental processes (e.g., changing climate, predator‑prey relations, nutrient flux), and analyzing the outcomes. Requirements: advanced courses in environmental geography or environmental science and senior standing.
 
044:145 (GEOG:4500) Applications in Environmental Remote Sensing4 s.h.
Theory and practice of remote sensing and digital image processing; practical applications to human‑environment interactions. Recommendations: 044:105 (GEOG:3500) or 012:110 (GEOS:3100) or 159:110 (ENVS:3100).
 
044:146 (GEOG:3570) Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR): Principles and Applications3 s.h.
Basic principles and applications of Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR); LiDAR as an essential technology for mapping and analysis of a vast range of surfaces; application examples include floodplain mapping, forestry management, transportation planning, vegetation analysis, urban planning, and 3‑D modeling; theoretical understanding and practical experience using different software. Recommendations: 012:110 (GEOS:3100) or 044:105 (GEOG:3500).
 
044:150 (GEOG:4030) Senior Project Seminar3 s.h.
Development of a research project and preparation of a research report. Offered spring semesters.
 
044:151 (GEOG:4990) Senior Thesis3 s.h.
Original research. Requirements: senior standing.
 
044:161 (GEOG:2404) African Development3 s.h.
Problems of economic, political, spatial integration in Africa; patterns and processes of economic development and nation building. GE: International and Global Issues; Social Sciences.
 
044:164 (GEOG:4960) The Middle East3 s.h.
Middle East cultures, political economy, conflict; significance of the Middle East in world affairs, vice versa.
 
044:174 (GEOG:4130) Health, Work, and the Environment3 s.h.
Current topics in occupational and environmental health; how the United States protects workers, protects people from environmental agents, and reduces environmental harm. Same as 175:101 (OEH:3210).
 
044:175 (GEOG:3760) Hazards and Society3 s.h.
Introduction to social science perspectives on societal responses to natural and technological hazards; risk perception and communication, disaster management, social vulnerability, and risk assessment; case studies of recent major disasters (e.g., Haiti earthquake, Tohoku earthquake/tsunami/nuclear accident, Hurricane Katrina); current directions in hazards research, policy, and practice. Same as 152:180 (GHS:3760).
 
044:177 (GEOG:4770) Environmental Justice3 s.h.
Review of theoretical positions for examining environmental justice, application of those theories to environmental controversies around the globe.
 
044:179 (GEOG:3340) Ecosystem Services: Human Dependence on Natural Systems3 s.h.
Ecosystem services from an interdisciplinary perspective centering on geographic techniques used to measure, map, and model ecosystem services; methods used to incorporate ecosystem services into decision and policy making; reliance on ecosystem services, valuable goods, and services produced by ecosystems such as flood control, food production, and water purification for well being; how activities alter ecosystems and thus alter these services, reducing quality‑of‑life or, in some cases, the ability to survive. Prerequisites: 044:005 (GEOG:1050), and 002:011 or 002:022 (BIOL:1370) or 002:134 (BIOL:2673) or 012:008 (GEOS:1080) or 044:003 (GEOG:1020) or 044:019 (GEOG:1070) or 044:103 (GEOG:2374) or 044:123 (GEOG:3310) or 159:008 (ENVS:1080) or 159:134 (ENVS:2673).
 
044:180 (GEOG:4010) Field Methods in Physical Geography2-4 s.h.
Methods of measuring climate, vegetation, soil, landforms, water; projects in areas including field meteorology, tree‑ring sampling, topographic surveying, vegetation sampling, water quality sampling, use of global positioning systems; introduction to research design.
 
044:181 (GEOG:4020) Field Methods: Mapping and Mobile Computing3 s.h.
Development and application of mobile geographic information technologies; key issues associated with global positioning systems (GPS), wireless technologies, field‑based data collection and analysis, ubiquitous computing, and location‑based services; experience using GPS, advanced mobile computing technologies, mobile GIS software to construct geographic datasets, and data sampling techniques.
 
044:186 (GEOG:3360) Soil Genesis and Geomorphology3 s.h.
Introduction to soil genesis, soil geomorphology, and classification including the basics of soil profile description and soil‑landscape, soil‑vegetation, and soil‑climate relationships; emphasis on study of soils as the interface between living and non‑living Earth systems and the role of soils in sustaining ecosystems and human societies; short field excursions and a weekend field trip. Requirements: college earth science and chemistry. Same as 012:136 (GEOS:3360).
 
044:188 (GEOG:4870) Applied Geostatistics3 s.h.
Applications of geostatistical methods to geology, geography, hydrology, environmental sciences, and engineering; variogram, Kriging, analysis of spatial‑varied data with varied computer software in participants' specialties. Same as 012:178 (GEOS:4870).
 
044:194 (GEOG:3910) Geographic Perspectives on Development3 s.h.
Theoretical and empirical studies of the regional development process, with emphasis on developing countries; alternative regional development theories and changes in development theories in the literature of geography, related disciplines.
 
044:195 (GEOG:3992) Undergraduate Researcharr.
Supervised research in geography.
 
044:197 (GEOG:3001) Special Topicsarr.
Contemporary fields of inquiry, such as political economy, regional/African development, biophysical systems, GIS, locational analysis, water resources, economic geography, demographic analysis, environment, urbanization, transportation.
 
044:199 (GEOG:4995) Honors Thesisarr.
Original research. Requirements: honors standing.
 

For Graduate Students

044:200 (GEOG:5001) Readingsarr.
Supervised readings by graduate students in topics of their choice.
 
044:210 (GEOG:5010) Fundamentals of Geography3 s.h.
Geography as an academic discipline; history, advances, epistemology, common themes.
 
044:211 (GEOG:5050) Research and Writing in Geography3 s.h.
Identification of research areas; research questions and hypotheses; responsible conduct of research; methodological decisions; research proposal and paper writing.
 
044:241 (GEOG:3550) Integrating Time into GIS3 s.h.
Fundamental concepts for integrating temporal elements into geographic information systems (GIS); conceptual and formal models of time, models of change, event‑based modeling, modeling of moving entities; topics related to fundamentals of spatiotemporal databases and query languages. Prerequisites: 044:005 (GEOG:1050).
 
044:242 (GEOG:5650) Simulations in Landscape Ecology3 s.h.
Dynamics of land use and land cover change explored through advanced use of computer simulations in landscape ecology; how simulation is used in the field; simulations based on landscape ecology questions, with analysis of results using typical landscape ecology metrics. Requirements: 044:142 (GEOG:4650).
 
044:243 (GEOG:5550) Modeling Space and Time3 s.h.
How to generate time‑space‑resolved estimates of sociophysical environmental contexts with the aid of modern geo‑spatial technologies; how to model social, behavioral, and health outcomes with reference to multilevel time‑space‑resolved sociophysical environmental contexts; environmental contexts from air pollution and pesticide concentration to neighborhood diversity; statistical modeling of varied social, behavioral, and health outcomes such as dropping out of college, smoking, excessive weight, asthma, mental and physical disability. Requirements: a course in statistics and good understanding of correlation and regression.
 
044:265 (GEOG:6264) Planning Sustainable Transportation3 s.h.
Theories and methods of exerting public control over passenger and freight transportation; social and environmental regulation; effects of changing finance, regulation, and pricing policies, including privatization, tolls, impact fees. Same as 102:265 (URP:6265).
 
044:286 (GEOG:6635) Crossing Borders Seminar2-3 s.h.
Same as 016:247 (HIST:6635), 008:231 (ENGL:6635), 030:242 (POLI:6635), 048:247 (CCL:6635), 113:247 (ANTH:6635), 129:231 (AFAM:6635), 013:262 (GRMN:6635), 035:273 (SPAN:6904), 160:247 (PORO:6635), 181:247 (IWP:6635), 009:262 (FREN:6142).
 
044:287 (GEOG:6632) Crossing Borders Proseminararr.
Same as 016:244 (HIST:6632), 030:243 (POLI:6632), 048:244 (CCL:6632), 113:248 (ANTH:6632), 013:260 (GRMN:6632), 035:271 (SPAN:6903).
 
044:296 (GEOG:5060) Topics in Geographic Information Science3 s.h.
Current theoretical research issues in geographic information science; intensive readings.
 
044:297 (GEOG:5070) Special Topicsarr.
Contemporary fields of inquiry, such as political economy, regional/African development, biophysical systems, GIS, locational analysis, water resources, economic geography, demographic analysis, environment, urbanization, transportation.
 
044:315 (GEOG:6500) Seminar in Spatial Analysis and Modeling1-3 s.h.
Research themes in spatial analysis, GIScience, simulation, remote sensing.
 
044:316 (GEOG:6300) Seminar in Environment, Conservation, and Land Use3 s.h.
Research on land use, water resources, conservation.
 
044:318 (GEOG:6100) Seminar in Health and Environment3 s.h.
Research on health and environment.
 
044:319 (GEOG:6900) Seminar in International Development3 s.h.
Research on GIScience and development.
 
044:350 (GEOG:7000) Geography Colloquiumarr.
 
044:415 (GEOG:7550) Research in Spatial Analysis and Modeling3 s.h.
Directed research in spatial analysis, GIScience, simulation.
 
044:416 (GEOG:7350) Seminar: Environment, Conservation, and Land Use3 s.h.
Directed research in land use, water resources, conservation.
 
044:417 (GEOG:7750) Research in Environmental Policy3 s.h.
Directed research in environmental justice and policy.
 
044:418 (GEOG:7150) Research in Health and Environment3 s.h.
Directed research in health and environment.
 
044:419 (GEOG:7950) Research in International Development3 s.h.
Directed research in international development.
 
044:450 (GEOG:7999) Thesisarr.