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This is a draft edition of the 2014-15 Catalog; the final edition will be published in late summer 2014.

Biomedical Engineering

Chair

  • Joseph M. Reinhardt

Faculty

Professors

  • Karim Abdel-Malek, Brian D. Adams, James A. Brown, Thomas D. Brown, John J. Callaghan, Thomas L. Casavant, Krishnan B. Chandran, Charles R. Clark, Nicole Grosland, Patrick Hitchon, Eric Hoffman, Stephen K. Hunter, John C. Keller, Tae-Hong Lim, Madhavan L. Raghavan, Joseph M. Reinhardt, Clark Stanford, Ingo R. Titze, David Wilder

Associate professors

  • Michael Abramoff, Donald Anderson, John E. Bayouth, Terry A. Braun, Edwin L. Dove, Michael A. Mackey, Vincent Magnotta, James Martin, Jun Ni, Aliasger K. Salem, Todd Scheetz, David A. Stoltz, Robert Tucker, Jinhu Xiong, Denice Zingman

Assistant professors

  • Nathan Fethke, Fiorenza Ianzini, Hans Johnson, William R. Lynch, James Martin, Salem Rahamatalla, Ed Sander, Jessica Sieren, Steven Stasheff, Kai Tan, Sarah Vigmostad

Lecturer

  • Nicole Kallemeyn

Adjunct professor

  • Richard McLay

Adjunct associate professors

  • Junfeng Guo, R.T. Marler, Douglas R. Pedersen, Joel Pickar, Merryn Tawhai

Adjunct assistant professors

  • James W. Devocht, Jessica Goetz, Ram R. Gudavalli, Anneliese D. Heiner, Prem Ramakrishnan

Adjunct instructors

  • Thakir Almomani, Tom Bair, Hyunggun Kim
Undergraduate major: biomedical engineering (B.S.E.)
Graduate degrees: M.S. in biomedical engineering; Ph.D. in biomedical engineering
Web site: http://www.engineering.uiowa.edu/bme

The past half century has seen tremendous growth of technological activity in biology and medicine. As engineers increasingly have become involved with projects in the life and health sciences, biomedical engineering has emerged to bridge the gap between these sciences and engineering.

The Department of Biomedical Engineering fosters interdisciplinary activities across departments and colleges and maintains strong ties with the Carver College of Medicine and the Colleges of Dentistry, Nursing, and Public Health. The department strives to provide a well-rounded and superior engineering education that attracts outstanding students at both the undergraduate and graduate levels; to conduct high-quality research that enables faculty members and students to keep pace with and initiate new developments; and to serve government, industry, and institutions worldwide by making the department's facilities and faculty expertise accessible.

Several faculty members have joint appointments in biomedical engineering and in the Carver College of Medicine, the College of Dentistry, or the College of Public Health. Biomedical engineering undergraduates and graduate students collaborate with faculty members and their colleagues on research problems in the life and health sciences.

Undergraduate Program of Study

  • Major in biomedical engineering (Bachelor of Science in Engineering)

The department provides undergraduate students with a contemporary education in a multidisciplinary field of engineering. Its objective is to produce graduates who:

  • contribute to the biomedical field through the responsible design of devices, systems, processes, and policies that improve human health;
  • pursue a wide range of career options, including those in industry, academia, and medicine; and
  • advance to leadership positions in their chosen field.

Students who complete the program may pursue career opportunities in biomedical industries, such as design and development of biomedical instrumentation, diagnostic aids, life-support systems, prosthetic and orthotic devices, and man-machine systems; or they may pursue traditional career opportunities in industry, such as those rooted in mechanical or electrical engineering disciplines. Other career options are available in government (Food and Drug Administration, Environmental Protection Agency, National Institutes of Health, Veterans Affairs). Some biomedical engineering graduates elect to continue formal education in engineering, medicine, or law.

Bachelor of Science in Engineering

The Bachelor of Science in Engineering requires a minimum of 128 s.h. The major in biomedical engineering builds on the foundation provided by the B.S.E. core requirements, preparing students for the challenges and opportunities associated with careers in the profession.

The program has been designed carefully to enable students to satisfy the entrance requirements of the Graduate College. Students whose choice of electives includes a three-course sequence in organic chemistry, an additional biology course, and a biochemistry course may satisfy entrance requirements of the Carver College of Medicine, the College of Dentistry, or the allied health sciences.

All engineering students complete the B.S.E. core requirements, which include RHET:1030 (010:003) Rhetoric; ENGR:1100 (059:005) Engineering Problem Solving I and ENGR:1300 (059:006) Engineering Problem Solving II; and courses in chemistry, and engineering mathematics and fundamentals, and physics. They must earn a grade of C-minus or higher in the core requirements MATH:1550 (22M:031) Engineering Mathematics I: Single Variable Calculus and MATH:1560 (22M:032) Engineering Mathematics II: Multivariable Calculus.

They also complete the curriculum designed for their major program, which covers four stems: mathematics and basic sciences, engineering topics, an elective focus area, and the general education component (15 s.h. of humanities and social science courses). For information about the curriculum stems, see Bachelor of Science in Engineering in the Catalog.

Biomedical engineering students must choose a track, which constitutes the elective focus area for the biomedical engineering major. They may choose one of seven preapproved tracks—bioinformatics, bioimaging, biomaterials, cardiovascular biomechanics, cellular engineering, musculoskeletal biomechanics, or pre-medicine—or they may propose a track that they have tailored to their own individual biomedical engineering interests. Each approved track has a group of four required courses and a list of suggested electives. For details about tracks and their requirements, visit Tracks on the department's web site.

The following study plan includes the B.S.E. core requirements and the curriculum for the biomedical engineering major. Some courses in this plan are prerequisites for others. Students must complete a course's prerequisites before they may register for the course. Those who take courses in the order below satisfy the prerequisite requirements automatically.

FIRST YEAR
First Semester 
CHEM:1110 (004:011) Principles of Chemistry I4 s.h.
ENGR:1000 (059:090) Engineering Success for First-Year Students (credit does not count toward B.S.E. degree)1 s.h.
ENGR:1100 (059:005) Engineering Problem Solving I3 s.h.
MATH:1550 (22M:031) Engineering Mathematics I: Single Variable Calculus4 s.h.
RHET:1030 (010:003) Rhetoric4 s.h.
Second Semester 
BME:1010 (051:090) First-Year Forum1 s.h.
CHEM:1120 (004:012) Principles of Chemistry II4 s.h.
ENGR:1300 (059:006) Engineering Problem Solving II3 s.h.
MATH:1560 (22M:032) Engineering Mathematics II: Multivariable Calculus4 s.h.
MATH:2550 (22M:033) Engineering Mathematics III: Matrix Algebra2 s.h.
PHYS:1611 (029:081) Introductory Physics I4 s.h.
SECOND YEAR
First Semester 
BME:2010 (051:091) Professional Seminar: Biomedical Engineering1 s.h.
BIOL:1411 (002:031) Foundations of Biology4 s.h.
ENGR:2110 (059:007) Engineering Fundamentals I: Statics2 s.h.
ENGR:2120 (059:008) Engineering Fundamentals II: Electrical Circuits3 s.h.
ENGR:2130 (059:009) Engineering Fundamentals III: Thermodynamics3 s.h.
MATH:2560 (22M:034) Engineering Mathematics IV: Differential Equations3 s.h.
Second Semester 
BME:2010 (051:091) Professional Seminar: Biomedical Engineering1 s.h.
BME:2200 (051:060) Systems, Instrumentation, and Data Acquisition4 s.h.
BME:2210 (051:080) Bioimaging and Bioinformatics4 s.h.
BME:2500 (051:050) Biomaterials and Biomechanics4 s.h.
HHP:3500 (027:130) Human Physiology3 s.h.
General education component course3 s.h.
THIRD YEAR
First Semester 
BME:2110 (051:030) Cell Biology for Engineers3 s.h.
BME:3010 (051:092) Leadership and Resourcefulness1 s.h.
BIOS:5110 (171:161) Introduction to Biostatistics3 s.h.
PHYS:1612 (029:082) Introductory Physics II (with laboratory)3-4 s.h.
General education component courses6 s.h.
Second Semester 
BME:4010 (051:093) Biomedical Engineering Design Seminar1 s.h.
Required track courses6 s.h.
Track electives6 s.h.
General education component course3 s.h.
FOURTH YEAR
First Semester 
BME:4910 (051:085) Biomedical Engineering Senior Design I4 s.h.
Required track courses6 s.h.
Track electives6 s.h.
Second Semester 
BME:4920 (051:086) Biomedical Engineering Senior Design II4 s.h.
Track electives9 s.h.
General education component course3 s.h.

Joint B.S.E./M.S.

The College of Engineering offers a joint (fast-track) Bachelor of Science in Engineering/Master of Science for biomedical engineering undergraduate students who intend to earn an M.S. in biomedical engineering. B.S.E./M.S. students take some graduate-level course work, attend the departmental graduate seminar, and work on a master's thesis or research project while they are still undergraduates. They may count a limited amount of credit toward both degrees. Once students complete the requirements for the bachelor's degree, they are granted the B.S.E., and they normally complete course work for the M.S. one year later.

To be admitted to the joint degree program, students must have completed at least 80 s.h., must have a cumulative g.p.a. of at least 3.50, and must submit a letter of application to the chair of the Department of Biomedical Engineering stating the intended area of specialization and the name of the proposed M.S. advisor.

Joint B.S.E./M.S. in Occupational and Environmental Health

B.S.E. students majoring in biomedical engineering who are interested in earning a Master of Science in occupational and environmental health may apply to the joint B.S.E./M.S. program offered by the College of Engineering and the College of Public Health. The joint program permits students to count a limited amount of credit toward the requirements of both degrees, enabling them to begin the study of public health before they complete the bachelor's degree. For information about the M.S. program, see Occupational and Environmental Health (College of Public Health) in the Catalog.

Graduate Programs of Study

  • Master of Science in biomedical engineering (with or without thesis)
  • Doctor of Philosophy in biomedical engineering

Graduate study in biomedical engineering prepares students to use contemporary methods at an advanced level during a professional career in engineering design, development, and research.

Each student's course of study is based on individual background and career objectives, and sound academic practice. Department faculty members have teaching and research expertise in areas related to cardiovascular and fluid biomechanics, musculoskeletal biomechanics, biomaterials and tissue engineering, bioinstrumentation, biosystems, biomedical imaging, biological signal analysis, bioinformatics and computational biology, and other allied fields.

An individual program for each student may be developed from courses offered by the biomedical engineering department and other departments, especially mechanical engineering, electrical engineering, physiology, mathematics, and biological sciences. M.S. students who want a more general program may combine emphases, while those who want some specialization in a particular field can achieve their goals through the combination of departmental courses and appropriate electives from other departments of the College of Engineering and the University.

Ph.D. programs may center on any one of the previously described areas through the choice of appropriate course work and research topic.

Master of Science

The Master of Science program in biomedical engineering requires a minimum of 30 s.h. of graduate credit, with or without thesis. Students who choose the nonthesis program must earn at least 6 s.h. of credit in courses numbered 5000 or above. Those who choose the thesis program may count no more than 6 s.h. of thesis research and writing credit toward the degree. The M.S. may be a terminal degree or a step toward the Ph.D.

A tentative plan of study for each student is determined through consultation with an advisor. An M.S. committee of at least three graduate faculty members, including at least two on the biomedical engineering faculty, is appointed by the dean of the Graduate College. The student's plan of study is reviewed by the committee before the student has completed 18 s.h. of course work. The plan of study then is submitted for review to the department chair.

M.S. students must fulfill the grade-point-average requirements of the Graduate College on a minimum of 30 s.h. of graduate work and must successfully complete the final examination administered by their committee.

M.S. students (thesis or nonthesis) must complete the following courses or their equivalents.

BIOS:5110 (171:161) Introduction to Biostatistics3 s.h.
ENGR:7270 (057:270) Engineering Ethics1 s.h.
HHP:3500 (027:130) Human Physiology3 s.h.
ME:5113 (058:113) Mathematical Methods in Engineering (or equivalent math course numbered 3000 or above)3 s.h.

Individual study plans should include as much advanced work as individual aptitude and previous preparation permit.

Doctor of Philosophy

The Doctor of Philosophy program in biomedical engineering requires a minimum of 72 s.h. of graduate work, including acceptable transfer credit. At least 42 s.h. must be earned in formal course work taken after the B.S. is awarded, and at least 12 s.h. must be earned for research and the thesis. Students who enter with an M.S. may count a maximum of 33 s.h. of approved transfer credit toward the Ph.D., but they must earn 39 s.h. of graduate credit at The University of Iowa, including at least 12 s.h. for research and the thesis. Based on the student's research progress, examination results, or other measures, the graduate committee may require additional formal course work to strengthen perceived areas of weakness.

Ph.D. students must complete the following courses or their equivalents.

BIOS:5110 (171:161) Introduction to Biostatistics3 s.h.
ENGR:7270 (057:270) Engineering Ethics1 s.h.
HHP:3500 (027:130) Human Physiology3 s.h.
ME:5113 (058:113) Mathematical Methods in Engineering (or equivalent math course numbered 3000 or above)3 s.h.

Admission to the Ph.D. program is conditional until students successfully complete a qualifying examination. The biomedical engineering faculty administers the exam and decides whether the student's performance on it is adequate for admission to the Ph.D. program.

Admission to Ph.D. candidacy requires a g.p.a. of at least 3.00 on all graduate work done at The University of Iowa. Upon completion of the course work specified in the plan of study and with the required grade-point average and the advisor's recommendation, students are admitted to the comprehensive examination by their committee.

Having satisfactorily completed these examinations, students usually have only to complete and defend their dissertation at the final examination. Requirements for the Ph.D. generally can be completed in about three years beyond the master's degree. 

Admission

Applicants must meet the admission requirements of the Graduate College; see the Manual of Rules and Regulations of the Graduate College or the Graduate College section of the Catalog.

Applicants who have earned a baccalaureate or postbaccalaureate degree in engineering or in the mathematical or physical sciences, with a g.p.a. of at least 3.00, and who have a combined verbal and quantitative score of 310 on the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) General Test are eligible to be considered for admission to the Master of Science program in biomedical engineering. Students with a lower grade-point average or GRE General Test scores may be considered for conditional admission; they must achieve regular standing within 8 s.h. of their initial registration by attaining the minimum grade-point average required by the Graduate College and regular acceptance by the department faculty. Students who do not meet these requirements are subject to dismissal.

Reference letters, research interests, previous graduate grade-point average, and other factors may be considered in making admission decisions.

Admission to the Doctor of Philosophy in biomedical engineering is conditional until students successfully complete a qualifying examination.

Financial Support

Students are encouraged to apply for fellowships and assistantships. Contact the chair of the Department of Biomedical Engineering.

Facilities and Laboratories

Undergraduate Teaching Laboratories

Five dedicated undergraduate teaching laboratories are associated with the required and elective courses in biomedical engineering: Biomaterials Laboratory, Biomeasurements and Biosystems Laboratory, Biomechanics Laboratory, Cell Biology for Engineers Laboratory, and Senior Design Laboratory.

BIOMATERIALS

The Biomaterials Laboratory is equipped to test varied properties of biomaterials, including hard and soft tissues and prostheses. The laboratory is used for biomaterials courses, senior design projects, and BME:5421 (051:177) Cell Material Interactions.

BIOMEASUREMENTS AND BIOSYSTEMS

The Biomeasurements and Biosystems Laboratory is equipped to measure biomedical variables of clinical and physiological interest, design and build electronic instrumentation, and conduct modeling experiments in physiology. It is used for BME:2200 (051:060) Systems, Instrumentation, and Data Acquisition, BME:2210 (051:080) Bioimaging and Bioinformatics, elective courses in biomeasurements and biological systems analysis, senior design projects, and demonstrations in BME:2110 (051:030) Cell Biology for Engineers.

BIOMECHANICS

The Biomechanics Laboratory is equipped to perform experiments in biological flow analysis and in human musculoskeletal systems. The laboratory houses a pulse duplicator for simulating physiological pulsatile flow; a flow visualization set-up to analyze flow past stenosis and aneurysms; blood pressure and flow measurement devices; digital still, video, and motion caption cameras for kinematic analysis; a ski binding tester; a drop tower for impact testing; a two-channel EMG amplifier system; and a table-top material testing machine. The laboratory is used for BME:2500 (051:050) Biomaterials and Biomechanics, elective courses in cardiovascular and skeletal biomechanics, other elective courses, and senior design projects.

CELL BIOLOGY FOR ENGINEERS

The Cell Biology for Engineers Laboratory trains students in cell culture and biochemical analysis techniques as a foundation for future studies in quantitative cell-based studies. Students learn basic cell culture techniques, protein and nucleic acid analysis, adenovirus-mediated gene transfer techniques, microarray and analysis, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis of nucleic acids. They also are introduced to bioinformatics techniques used in cell biology. Major equipment in the lab includes laminar flow hoods, cell culture incubators, centrifuges, an ultracold freezer, protein and nucleic acid electrophoresis equipment, thermal cyclers, microscopes, an automated microplate reader, and varied support apparatuses used in cell-based studies. The lab is used for BME:2110 (051:030) Cell Biology for Engineers, BME:4120 (051:133) Advanced Cell Biology for Engineers, and BME:5421 (051:177) Cell Material Interactions.

SENIOR DESIGN

The Senior Design Laboratory provides a collaborative atmosphere for student groups as they create working prototypes. It has working and storage space for the development of senior design projects and a variety of tools and equipment, such as an electronic workbench, soldering station, Dremel tools, and so forth. It is used by students taking BME:4910 (051:085) Biomedical Engineering Senior Design I and BME:4920 (051:086) Biomedical Engineering Senior Design II.

Research Facilities and Laboratories

BIOINFORMATICS AND COMPUTATIONAL BIOLOGY LABORATORY

The Bioinformatics and Computational Biology Laboratory is wired for high-speed networking (10- and 100-megabit and gigabit ethernet, hardwired and wireless, and ATM). It includes five dedicated Linux clusters, 126 computing systems, 178 CPUs, more than 100 gigabytes of RAM, and 2.5 terabytes of disk space.

Computer resources include a dedicated computer server cluster of 18 Linux systems (36 CPUs) connected with a dedicated, switched, copper Gigabit Ethernet intranet—18 Dual AMD MP-2400 (2.2 GHz, 2 GB memory, 40 GB disk each); second dedicated computer server cluster of 16 Linux systems (32 CPUs) connected with a dedicated, switched, fiber-optic Gigabit Ethernet intranet—12 Dual Pentium III (500 MHz, 1 GB memory, 9 GB disk each), and four Dual Pentium III (500 MHz, 2 GB memory, 9 GB disk each); and third dedicated computer cluster of nine Linux systems (18 CPUs) connected with a dedicated 2.4 GB multistage intranet—eight Dual Pentium III (866 MHz, .5 GB memory, 45 GB disk each), and one Dual Pentium III (866 MHz, 1 GB memory, 45 GB disk each).

There are two additional clusters: an 8-node cluster of Pentium II class machines and a 12-system heterogeneous cluster of various SUNs, HPs, and SGIs; four dedicated, dual fiber channel, redundant disk storage systems (RAID) with 412 GB usable each. An additional 78 computers are used as compute servers, web servers, database servers, file servers, workstations, laptops, and for other developmental and experimental needs.

CARDIOVASCULAR BIOMECHANICS LABORATORY

The Cardiovascular Biomechanics Laboratory houses an EMS Whitest uniaxial tension/compression testing system, a pulse-duplicating apparatus with flow loop, a spectrophotometer, silicone prototype fabrication utilities, high-speed/high-resolution cameras, a Sun Solaris workstation, and personal computers. The lab is equipped for soft tissue tensile/compression testing and viscoelastic creep/relaxation testing; simulation of flow through fabricated, anatomically realistic, patient-specific models of vasculature and heart valves; quantification of protein content in soft tissues; fabrication of realistic, compliant prototypes of human organs; and computational modeling of hemodynamics and tissue mechanics of normal and pathological cardiovascular organs.

IOWA SPINE RESEARCH CENTER BIOMECHANICS LABORATORY

The Iowa Spine Research Center Biomechanics Laboratory is fully equipped to perform studies of tissue and/or specimen response to mechanical loads. An MTS Bionix servohydraulic testing machine (with extended columns) permits application of uniaxial tension or compression in concert with axial torsion under displacement (rotation) or load control. A spine stimulator consisting of an upper and lower gimbal permits kinematic studies of the spinal column (flexion-extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation). The laboratory also has a two-sensor (six-camera) 3-D motion capture system. These devices are used to test mechanical properties of biomechanical joints and tissues and for biomechanical evaluation of surgical treatment modalities. The center is located at the University of Iowa Research Park.

JOLT/VIBRATION/SEATING LABORATORY

The Jolt/Vibration/Seating Laboratory is equipped for investigation of the biomechanics of the spine, particularly problems related to low back pain due to the interaction between people and equipment in jolt (impact) and vibration environments. Three shakers are available to simulate impact and vibration environments.

Human responses are measured using equipment including load cells, electromyography, accelerometry, position sensors, and pressure pads. Portable sensors and data recorders are used to evaluate impact and vibration environments in the field and compare them to domestic and international guidelines and standards.

MULTISCALE MODELING, MECHANOBIOLOGY, AND TISSUE ENGINEERING LABORATORY

The Multiscale Modeling, Mechanobiology, and Tissue Engineering Laboratory is equipped for computational and experimental investigations centered on the role of physical forces in directing cell-material interactions that govern biological phenomena across multiple scales. A 650-square-foot core web lab has equipment for isolating, culturing, maintaining, and analyzing cells, including a Nu-Aire two-chamber incubator, lab refrigerator and freezer, and a Thermo Scientific 1300 Series class II, type A2 biological safety cabinet. A 120-square-foot microscopy room houses an ADMET BioTense top-mounted perfusion bioreactor that integrates with a Nikon Ti-E inverted microscope, a system equipped to simultaneously record force values and acquire images of cell-to-extracellular matrix interactions in 3-D environments (e.g., a collagen gel) at high magnification over long periods of time and under a suite of mechanical testing protocols. The MTESTQuattro material testing system and accompanying software controls the bioreactor temperature, drives the actuator, and records force. The system can be operated in load or displacement control, supplying monotonic, cyclic, or segmented control profiles. Both the microscope and bioreactor are interfaced with an HP Z210 convertible minitower base model workstation.

ORTHOPAEDIC BIOMECHANICS LABORATORY

The Orthopaedic Biomechanics Laboratory occupies 20 rooms on the ground floor of Westlawn. It is configured primarily for macroscopic-level physical testing of musculoskeletal constructs (e.g., bones, articular joints, orthopaedic implants) and for corresponding computational modeling. The physical testing area includes a multipurpose wet lab, a multipurpose dry lab, a surgical preparation room, a mechanical testing room, a machine shop, and a specimen storage area. The computational modeling area is arranged around eight separate workstation seats in two adjoining partially partitioned areas. Adjacent to these core operational areas are offices for faculty, research staff, students, and fellows; a secretarial/reception area; a conference room; and a library.

SPINE BIOMECHANICS AND ERGONOMICS LABORATORY

Located at University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, the Spine Biomechanics and Ergonomics Laboratory is equipped for investigation of the biomechanics of the spine, particularly problems related to production and treatment of low back pain. For example, electromyography equipment, accelerometry, a motion capture system, and a force plate are used to study response to sudden loads. A stadiometer is used to evaluate how varied activities affect shrinkage (creep) in the spine. A pressure pad is used to study interface pressures between people and chairs or beds.

SPINE RESEARCH LABORATORY

The Spine Research Laboratory is equipped for interdisciplinary research. The laboratory's MTS Bionix servohydraulic testing equipment (with extended columns) permits application of uniaxial tension or compression together with axial torsion under displacement or load control. The laboratory also has a fully automated 3-D motion measuring system. These devices are used to test mechanical properties of biomechanical joints and tissues, and for biomechanical evaluation of the performance of surgical treatment modalities. Other equipment includes digital cameras, surgical tools, and sensors (i.e., LVDTs, six-degrees-of-freedom load cell, pressure transducers, digital inclinometers).

A biaxial biomechanical culture system is available for application of controlled compression and/or shear forces onto the intervertebral disc during culture, in order to investigate the disc's biological responses to mechanical loads. This culture system is used in conjunction with an incubator in which cells and tissues can be cultured. Basic equipment for histology and immunohistochemical analyses includes a microtome, ovens, a microscope, and glassware for chemical processes.

TISSUE ENGINEERING LABORATORY

The Tissue Engineering Laboratory is outfitted with a fume hood, sink, laboratory counters, tables, and major tissue culture equipment, including a Baker SG3 laminar flow hood, a NuAir water jacked incubator, an autoclave, a vacuum pump, a Zeiss Axiovert S-100 phase contrast and bright field microscope with a computer interface, computer-controlled peristaltic pumps, a computer-controlled water bath, and a refrigerator and freezer.

The inverted microscope has an image capture system interfaced to a computer workstation with image processing software. A variety of sensors for performing temperature, pressure, and flow measurements also are available. The laboratory's computers are equipped with software for graphical, numerical, image analysis, word processing, and symbolic computation. Liquid nitrogen dewars, and CO2 and N2 tanks have been installed. An Ussing chamber with electrodes and a high impedance Keithley electrometer also are available.

Courses

Special Topics
 

BME:0000 (051:000) Cooperative Education Training Assignment: Biomedical Engineering0 s.h.
Biomedical engineering students participating in the Cooperative Education Program register for this course during work assignment periods; registration provides a record of participation in the program on the student's permanent record. Requirements: admission to Cooperative Education Program.
 
BME:0002 (051:002) Half-time Cooperative Education Training Assignment: Biomedical Engineering0 s.h.
Registration for work assignment periods; for students participating in the Cooperative Education Program.
 
BME:1010 (051:090) First-Year Forum1 s.h.
Presentations by faculty, graduate students, collaborators from the Carver College of Medicine, and Colleges of Dentistry and Law; may include visits to laboratories and industries.
 
BME:2010 (051:091) Professional Seminar: Biomedical Engineering1 s.h.
Professional aspects of biomedical engineering presented through lectures and discussions by guest speakers, field trips, films, panel discussions. Requirements: sophomore or higher standing.
 
BME:2110 (051:030) Cell Biology for Engineers3 s.h.
Introduction to fundamental concepts in quantitative cell biology from an engineering perspective. Prerequisites: BIOL:1411 (002:031).
 
BME:2200 (051:060) Systems, Instrumentation, and Data Acquisition4 s.h.
Introduction to linear system theory and application, including convolution, Laplace Transform, transient analysis, sinusoidal steady‑state analysis, and Fourier analysis; patient safety; acquisition and analysis of data collected from living systems, including concepts of analog circuit design with emphasis on operational amplifiers, active filters, clinical circuits, Nyquist concepts and digital conversion, and interface to computers; physics, acquisition, and analysis of medical images, especially those collected from X‑ray, CT, MR, and ultrasound systems. Prerequisites: ENGR:2120 (059:008). Corequisites: HHP:3500 (027:130).
 
BME:2210 (051:080) Bioimaging and Bioinformatics4 s.h.
Introduction to bioinformatics and biomedical imaging; computer algorithms, machine learning, databases and SQL, the web and web servers, ethics, computer security, genome technology, public warehouses of biological data; medical imaging hardware and software for acquisition and analysis of medical images, especially those collected from X‑ray, CT, MR, and ultrasound systems; medical imaging system physics, including interaction of energy with tissue, concepts of image spatial and temporal resolution; applications of filtering, enhancement, and image processing for analysis of medical images. Prerequisites: BIOL:1411 (002:031) and ENGR:1300 (059:006).
 
BME:2500 (051:050) Biomaterials and Biomechanics4 s.h.
Introduction to mechanics and materials in biological systems; principles of mechanics (stress, strain, motion, fluid flow) presented and used to characterize behavior of biological entities (tendon/ligament, bone and cartilage, blood, blood vessels, heart); principles of material science; role of biomaterials (metals, polymers,  ceramics) in medical devices. Prerequisites: ENGR:2110 (059:007). Corequisites: HHP:3500 (027:130).
 
BME:2710 (051:063) Engineering Drawing, Design, and Solid Modeling3 s.h.
Introduction to methods and principles used by engineers to define and describe geometry and topology of engineered components; use of Parametric Technology's Creo Pro (formerly ProEngineer) 3‑D CAD software; emphasis on elements of design; basic commands used in parametric design to develop spatial visualization skills and the ability to create and understand 3‑D solid parametric design for assembly and 3‑D drawing documentation; creation of 3‑D assemblies and detailed drawings from art of design to part, utilization of solid modeling techniques. Prerequisites: ENGR:2110 (059:007).
 
BME:3010 (051:092) Leadership and Resourcefulness1 s.h.
Development of leadership skills and resourcefulness for real‑world professional work and life. Requirements: completion of six semesters of BME:1010 (051:090) and BME:2010 (051:091) combined.
 
BME:3998 (051:098) Individual Investigations: Biomedical Engineeringarr.
Individual projects for biomedical engineering undergraduate students, such as laboratory study, engineering design projects, analysis and simulation of an engineering system, computer software development, research.
 
BME:4010 (051:093) Biomedical Engineering Design Seminar1 s.h.
Information and presentations about possible projects; mentors available for senior design projects. Requirements: junior standing.
 
BME:4110 (051:132) Principles of Regenerative Bioengineeringarr.
Embryonic, fetal, and adult sources, human and nonhuman "stemness" of cells; references to biomaterials (i.e., those designed to direct organization, growth, and differentiation of cells in process of forming functional tissue by providing physical and chemical cues); biomarkers and nano‑medicine; promises of bioinformatics in support tissue engineering, gene and protein sequencing, gene expression analysis, protein expression, and interaction analysis. Prerequisites: BIOL:1411 (002:031). Corequisites: HHP:3500 (027:130). Recommendations: BME:2110 (051:030).
 
BME:4111 (051:134) Fundamentals of NanoScale Technologies in Regenerative Bioengineering1 s.h.
Nanotechnology as an emerging field in the quest to better and more affordable health care; experimentation and development of new materials that benefit regenerative medicine; targeted drug delivery and enhanced tissue engineering as a priority in pursuit of new approaches in tissue and organ transplantation; state‑of‑the‑art new technologies applied to role of stem cells and biomedical engineering in future health care; seminar with reading and comments of significant journal articles in the field. Prerequisites: BME:4110 (051:132).
 
BME:4112 (051:136) Methods in Regenerative Bioengineering and NanoScale Technology3 s.h.
Nanotechnology as an emerging field in the quest to better and more affordable health care; experimentation and development of new materials that benefit regenerative medicine; targeted drug delivery and enhanced tissue engineering as a priority in pursuit of new approaches in tissue and organ transplantation; state‑of‑the‑art new technologies applied to role of stem cells and biomedical engineering in future health care. Prerequisites: BIOL:1411 (002:031). Corequisites: HHP:3500 (027:130). Recommendations: BME:2110 (051:030).
 
BME:4120 (051:133) Advanced Cell Biology for Engineers3 s.h.
Introduction to techniques and quantitative analysis used in cell biology and taught from cell engineering perspective; focus on isolation, intracellular localization, and determination of mRNA levels of specific cellular proteins; analysis of resulting data and interpret reliability of results; laboratory course. Prerequisites: BME:2110 (051:030).
 
BME:4910 (051:085) Biomedical Engineering Senior Design I4 s.h.
Individual or group work on a creative design project involving current problems in biomedical engineering; interdisciplinary projects involving biomedical engineering and health sciences faculty members; first semester of a year‑long senior capstone design project. Requirements: senior standing.
 
BME:4920 (051:086) Biomedical Engineering Senior Design II4 s.h.
Second semester of a year‑long senior capstone design project begun in BME:4910 (051:085). Prerequisites: BME:4910 (051:085).
 
BME:5020 (051:192) Seminar in Bioinformatics1 s.h.
Forum for research presentations by scientists with national and international prominence; broad range of research topics in bioinformatics, genomics, and high‑throughput biology; sponsored by the NIH T32 Bioinformatics Predoctoral Training Program at The University of Iowa.
 
BME:5320 (051:123) Bioinformatics Techniques3 s.h.
Informatics tools and techniques applied to modern problems in biomedicine and basic life sciences; common tools, experience applying tools in contemporary problem settings; genomics and genetics, how to sequence a genome, transcription and expression, SNPs, Perl, BioPerl, Perl modules, Ensembl API, BLAST/BLAT, NCBI, UCSC, Ensembl Genome browsers, linkage, association, disease gene identification. Prerequisites: BIOL:1411 (002:031) and ENGR:1300 (059:006).
 
BME:5325 (051:126) Introduction to Systems Biology3 s.h.
How higher‑level properties of complex biological systems arise from the interactions among their parts; fundamentals of biological network analysis with focus on protein‑protein interaction, regulatory, and genetic interaction networks; principles of systems biology and biological networks; experimental methods and analytical approaches for specific networks; current emerging research areas in the field of systems biology; didactic lectures and case‑study projects. Prerequisites: BIOL:4213 (002:170) or BME:5320 (051:123) or GENE:6170 (127:170), and BME:5330 (051:122). Recommendations: senior standing; or graduate standing with background in biology, computer science, applied mathematics, statistics, physics, or engineering.
 
BME:5330 (051:122) Computational Genomics3 s.h.
Introduction to computational methods used in genome analysis and functional genomics; biological sequence analysis, sequence database search, microarray data analysis, biological network analysis; in‑depth coverage of principal genome science challenges and recent solutions. Prerequisites: BME:5320 (051:123), CS:3110 (22C:104), and BIOS:5110 (171:161) or STAT:3510 (22S:101). Same as BIOL:5320 (002:174), GENE:5173 (127:173), ECE:5220 (055:122).
 
BME:5340 (051:125) Contemporary Topics in Network Biology3 s.h.
Fundamentals of biological network analysis; focus on protein‑protein interaction, regulatory, genetic interaction networks; principles of systems biology and biological networks, experimental methods and analytical approaches for specific networks side‑by‑side in detail; current emerging research areas in the field of systems biology; suitable for upper‑level undergraduates and graduate students with background in biology, computer science, applied mathematics, statistics, physics, or engineering. Prerequisites: BIOL:4213 (002:170) or GENE:6170 (127:170), and BME:5330 (051:122). Recommendations: knowledge in molecular cell biology and a programming language (i.e., Perl, Matlab, R, C).
 
BME:5430 (051:167) Biotransport3 s.h.
Energy, mass, and momentum transport in living systems; processes essential for understanding how physiological systems function from molecular level through scale of tissues and organs; fluid mechanics and physiological flows, mass transport, biochemical kinetics and reactions, bioheat transfer; conservation laws; various biological applications.
 
BME:5710 (051:162) Digital Human Modeling and Simulation3 s.h.
Fundamentals of using computational methods in modeling, simulating, and animating articulated kinematic chains such as robots and humans; underlying mathematics, introductory concepts in kinematics and dynamics, serial chain kinematics and multibody dynamics; methods from kinematics and dynamics, coupled with biomechanical concepts, provide an integrated approach to predicting and analyzing serial link motion (e.g., human and robotic manipulator motion). Prerequisites: ENGR:2710 (057:010). Same as ME:5130 (058:136).
 
BME:5910 (051:178) Fast-Track Biomedical Engineering Design 1-A3 s.h.
Part A of first semester of year‑long senior capstone design project; individual or group design project involving biomedical engineering problems. Corequisites: BME:5911 (051:180). Requirements: senior standing.
 
BME:5911 (051:180) Fast-Track Biomedical Engineering Design 1-B1 s.h.
Part B of first semester of year‑long senior capstone design project; individual or group project involving biomedical engineering problems. Corequisites: BME:5910 (051:178). Requirements: senior standing.
 
BME:5920 (051:179) Fast-Track Biomedical Engineering Design 2-A3 s.h.
Part A of second semester of year‑long senior capstone design project started in BME:5910 (051:178) and BME:5911 (051:180). Prerequisites: BME:5910 (051:178). Corequisites: BME:5921 (051:183).
 
BME:5921 (051:183) Fast-Track Biomedical Engineering Design 2-B1 s.h.
Part B of second semester of year‑long senior capstone design project started in BME:5910 (051:178) and BME:5911 (051:180). Prerequisites: BME:5910 (051:178). Corequisites: BME:5920 (051:179).
 
BME:6120 (051:236) Advanced Topics in Regenerative Bioengineering and NanoScale Biotechnology3 s.h.
Continuation of BME:4110 (051:132) with in‑depth examples and approaches; development of organs through stem cells maturation and differentiation complemented by biomedical applications; fundamental concepts of stem cell biology applied to modern technology; reference to biomaterials (those designed to direct organization, growth, and differentiation of cells); concept of biomarkers and nanomedicine based on the notion that new materials can be engineered to not interfere with normal biological conditions and unique enough to be detected non‑invasively with modern diagnostic instruments (CT, MRI, Echo).   Prerequisites: BME:2110 (051:030) or BME:4110 (051:132).
 
BME:6310 (051:225) Contemporary Topics in Bioinformatics3 s.h.
Next‑generation sequencing technology and design, next‑generation sequencing analysis and algorithms, contemporary topics in bioinformatics, genetics of disease (visual system as a model) and genetic engineering; grant writing. Recommendations: BME:5330 (051:122) or advanced programming skills and understanding of DNA.
 

Biomaterials
 

BME:5401 (051:170) Biomaterials and Implant Design3 s.h.
Introduction to material and mechanical considerations underlying a broad range of medical implants; emphasis on understanding factors involved in orthopaedic device design; major classes of biomaterials; considerations that underlie implant design, use, failure; contemporary areas of biomaterials and implant development. Prerequisites: BME:2500 (051:050) and ENGR:2750 (057:019).
 
BME:5415 (051:168) Polymer Fundamentals1 s.h.
Basic knowledge of polymers required as a foundation for other UI courses on polymers: basic polymer terminology, polymer groups, polymerization mechanisms, molecular weight determination. Five weeks. Same as CBE:5309 (052:140).
 
BME:5421 (051:177) Cell Material Interactions3 s.h.
Current thought and techniques in the engineering and assessment of biomaterials. Prerequisites: BME:2110 (051:030).
 
BME:6110 (051:259) Mechanics of Cells and Cellular Systems3 s.h.
Mechanics of cells; focus on cellular mechanical properties, responses to mechanical stimuli, cellular forces and measurement, and computational tools; cellular environment considered with implication to disease pathologies and medical device design considerations.
 

Biomechanics/Biofluids
 

BME:5510 (051:154) Cardiac and Vascular Mechanics3 s.h.
Bio‑solid mechanics of the cardiovascular system; mechanical properties of ventricles, valves, and blood vessels, their normal function, how they are affected by disease states; design of artificial organs, prostheses. Prerequisites: BME:2500 (051:050) and ENGR:2750 (057:019).
 
BME:5520 (051:155) Cardiovascular Fluid Mechanics3 s.h.
Anatomy and physiology of the human circulatory system, pressure‑flow relationship in arteries, elastic properties of the arterial wall, steady and pulsatile flow dynamics, flow dynamics of human heart valves, flow dynamics past valve prostheses, fluid mechanical measurements in circulation, relationship between fluid mechanics and diseases in human circulation. Prerequisites: BME:2500 (051:050).
 
BME:5530 (051:159) Design of Circulatory Implants and Artificial Organs3 s.h.
Exploration of current innovations and new technologies; examination of various devices currently on the market from a standpoint of design variables and objectives (i.e., stents, heart valves, dialyzers, VADs, artificial organs); biomedical engineers' vital role in design and improvement of these implants. Prerequisites: BME:2500 (051:050).
 
BME:5610 (051:150) Musculoskeletal Biomechanics3 s.h.
Principles of solid mechanics applied to analytical, experimental investigation of biological systems; emphasis on applications in kinesiology of human musculoskeletal system. Prerequisites: BME:2500 (051:050) and ENGR:2750 (057:019).
 
BME:5620 (051:157) Introduction to Applied Biomedical Finite Element Modeling3 s.h.
Introduction to finite element modeling as applied to biomechanics‑related applications. Prerequisites: BME:2500 (051:050) and ENGR:2750 (057:019).
 
BME:5630 (051:147) Kinetics of Musculoskeletal Systems3 s.h.
Principles of kinematics; kinetics applied to analytical and experimental investigation of musculoskeletal systems; mathematical foundations for kinematic and kinetic analyses; examples of mathematical modeling of human movements. Prerequisites: ENGR:2710 (057:010).
 
BME:5640 (051:152) Ergonomics of Occupational Injuries3 s.h.
Epidemiology, surveillance systems, ergonomics, biomechanics, physiology, psychology, legal aspects, and cost control. Prerequisites: BME:2500 (051:050) and ENGR:2750 (057:019).
 
BME:5660 (051:151) Intermediate Mechanics of Deformable Bodies3 s.h.
Application of equilibrium analyses, strain‑displacement relations, and constitutive relationships to practical structural systems and elementary plane elasticity problems. Prerequisites: ENGR:2750 (057:019). Same as CEE:5540 (053:140), ME:5150 (058:150).
 
BME:6415 (051:260) Advanced Biomechanics and Modeling of Soft Tissues3 s.h.
This course will cover the application of continuum mechanics and modeling to the study of biological tissues and biomaterials.
 
BME:6515 (051:256) Advanced Biological Soft Tissue Mechanics3 s.h.
Topics in vascular solid mechanics; study of vascular tissue from theoretical (constitutive modeling), experimental, and computational perspectives.
 
BME:6520 (051:255) Advanced Biofluid Mechanics3 s.h.
Hemodynamic theories of atherogenesis, Womersley models, steady and unsteady flows in curavature, bifurcation and branching arterial segments, flow dynamics past prosthetic implants, experimental and computational models, particulate and mass transport simulations in human circulation. Prerequisites: BME:5520 (051:155).
 
BME:6610 (051:253) Spine Mechanics3 s.h.
Biomechanics applied to mechanics of the human spine; clinical aspects; state‑of‑the‑art in spine research; basic engineering principles for biomechanical analysis. Prerequisites: BME:5610 (051:150).
 
BME:6630 (051:220) Human Response to Vibration3 s.h.
Exploration of the human body, a complex mechanism exposed to mechanical shock and vibration from many sources, under many conditions; interactions and applicable exposure standards, effects of whole‑body and hand‑arm vibration. Requirements: graduate standing in College of Engineering or College of Public Health.
 

Bioelectrical Engineering
 

BME:5200 (051:182) Biomedical Signal Processing3 s.h.
Application of signal processing methods (e.g., Fourier, Laplace, z‑transforms) to biomedical problems, such as analysis of cardiac signals, circadian rhythm, the breathing cycle; computer simulation lab.
 
BME:5210 (051:185) Medical Imaging Physics3 s.h.
Physics and data acquisition techniques of major medical imaging modalities (X‑ray, CT, MR, ultrasound, PET, SPECT); physical interactions of energy with living tissue; principles and methods for acquiring imaging data and subsequent image construction; how individual modalities influence image quality; MATLAB programming required. Second in a medical imaging sequence. Prerequisites: BME:2200 (051:060) and BME:2210 (051:080).
 
BME:5220 (051:148) Digital Image Processing3 s.h.
Mathematical foundations and practical techniques for digital manipulation of images; image sampling, compression, enhancement, linear and nonlinear filtering and restoration; Fourier domain analysis; image pre‑processing, edge detection, filtering; image segmentation. Prerequisites: BME:2210 (051:080) or ECE:2400 (055:040). Same as ECE:5480 (055:148).
 
BME:5230 (051:186) Multidimensional Medical Imaging Process3 s.h.
Algorithms developed to process and analyze large volumetric data sets; physics of CT, MRI, ultrasound, 3‑D convolution and filtering, geometric transformations, shape features, surface segmentation, regional segmentation, surface tiling, surface reconstruction, volumetric registration. Third in a medical imaging sequence. Prerequisites: ENGR:1300 (059:006).
 
BME:5250 (051:187) Health Informatics I3 s.h.
Technological tools that support health care administration, management, and decision making. Requirements: graduate standing. Same as MED:5300 (050:283), SLIS:5900 (021:275), RSNM:3195 (074:191), HMP:5370 (174:226), IE:5860 (056:186), IGPI:5200 (200:110).
 
BME:5251 (051:141) Advanced Biosystems3 s.h.
Biological systems unique to systems analysis; operation under nonequilibrium conditions; tools for systems analysis developed from models of systems at equilibrium (i.e., mechanical systems); fundamental difference between biological and mechanical systems that impact systems analysis; expand knowledge of linear systems and begin work with nonlinear systems; various modeling and analysis approaches useful in biomedical and biomedical engineering research. Prerequisites: BME:2200 (051:060).
 
BME:5252 (051:189) Health Informatics II3 s.h.
Selected health informatics initiatives, including computer‑based patient records, physiologic monitoring, networking, imaging, virtual reality; participation in an interdisciplinary project team focused on an informatics innovation; application and research seminars. Same as RSNM:5301 (074:192), IE:5870 (056:287), SLIS:5910 (021:280), IGPI:5210 (200:120).
 

Graduate Seminars, Advanced Topics, Research
 

BME:5010 (051:191) Seminar in Biomedical Engineering0 s.h.
Presentation of recent advances in biomedical engineering. Requirements: graduate standing.
 
BME:5998 (051:198) Individual Investigations: Biomedical Engineeringarr.
Individual projects for biomedical engineering graduate students, such as laboratory study, engineering design project, analysis and simulation of an engineering system, computer software development, research. Requirements: graduate standing.
 
BME:5999 (051:199) Research: Biomedical Engineering M.S. Thesisarr.
Experimental and/or analytical investigation of an approved topic for partial fulfillment of the requirements for the M.S. with thesis in biomedical engineering. Requirements: graduate standing.
 
BME:7998 (051:298) Advanced Individual Investigations in Biomedical Engineeringarr.
Advanced individual projects such as laboratory study, engineering design projects, analysis and simulation of an engineering system, computer software development, research.
 
BME:7999 (051:299) Research: Biomedical Engineering Ph.D. Dissertationarr.
Experimental and/or analytical investigation of an approved topic for partial fulfillment of requirements for Ph.D. with thesis in biomedical engineering.