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Social Work

Director

  • Edward J. Saunders

Faculty

Professor

  • Carol Coohey

Associate professors

  • Mercedes Bern-Klug, Amy C. Butler, Carolyn Hartley, Julia Kleinschmit, Miriam Landsman, Susan Murty, Lynette Renner, Sara Sanders, Edward J. Saunders, Jeanne Saunders

Assistant professors

  • Stephen Cummings, Yvonne Farley, Lily French, Megan Gilster, Man Guo, Motier Haskins, M. Billie Marchik, Robert Vander Beek

Adjunct associate professors

  • Lisa D'Aunno, Brad Richardson

Adjunct assistant professors

  • Larry Allen, Mike Bandstra, Margaret Cretzmeyer, Sandra McGee, Beth Skinner, Stephen Trefz

Adjunct instructors

  • Ed Barnes, Margaret Bessman-Quintero, Susan Bixenman, Ryan Bobst, Lance Clemsen, Rick Connor, Raygena Curry, Suzanne Dell, Emily Donovan, Erin Feldman, Sr. Shirley Fineran, Romaine Foege, Judy Foote, Joel Fry, Brenda Geisinger, Thomas Gilsenan, Greg Gross, Kim Hanrahan, Edwin Haycraft, Barbara Hirsch-Giller, Kate Kemp, Sid Lutz, Lynn Meincke, Bonnie Mikelson, Ron Mirr, Pam Moore, Mary Newcomb, Greg Nooney, Angela Ohrt, Alison Oliver, Sarah Oliver, Jennifer Lock Omann, Elizabeth Rembold, Kathleen Ruyle, Mari Samuelson, Kathleen Shey, Diane Sonneville, Scott Stange, Eileen Swoboda, Ellen Szabo, Megan Thibodeau, Michael Thompson, Diane Tonkyn, Molly Twohig, Sue Witte, Joel Wulf, Joanne Young

Professors emeriti

  • Lorraine Dorfman, Patricia L. Kelley, Thomas H. Walz

Associate professors emeriti

  • Robert Jackson, Judith Rinehart, William M. Theisen

Assistant professor emeritus

  • B. Eleanor Anstey
Undergraduate major: social work (B.A.)
Undergraduate minor: social work
Graduate degrees: M.S.W.; Ph.D. in social work
Web site: http://clas.uiowa.edu/socialwork/

The School of Social Work's mission is to develop, disseminate, and integrate excellent and compelling research-based knowledge, practice, and policy, particularly that related to children, families, and older adults. The school operates from strengths-based perspectives and systems perspectives. It educates its graduates to be culturally competent scholars and practitioners who are committed to social justice and social work values and ethics, and who are prepared to serve in and have a positive impact on a broad range of family-centered and community-based practice settings throughout the State of Iowa and beyond.

The school provides a program of professional training accredited by the Council on Social Work Education at the baccalaureate and master's degree levels, aimed at developing effective intervention in multiple systems and using professional social work values and ethics. It also offers a Ph.D. program, which prepares students to conduct research that contributes to the knowledge base of social work, to be leaders in setting policy and practice, and to teach in colleges and universities.

In addition to offering undergraduate and graduate programs of study in social work, the school administers the Aging Studies Program, which offers a certificate for undergraduate and graduate students and a minor for undergraduates. The school also administers the undergraduate Certificate in Critical Cultural Competence. See Aging Studies and Critical Cultural Competence in the Catalog.

Undergraduate Programs of Study

  • Major in social work (Bachelor of Arts)
  • Minor in social work

The undergraduate program in social work has been accredited continuously by the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE) since 1974 and is designed to be consistent with the council's 2008 Educational Policy Statement competencies and practice behaviors. The program's goals are to:

  • prepare students for culturally competent generalist social work practice with individuals, families, small groups, organizations, and communities;
  • provide students with a base for continuing graduate education in social work and for lifelong learning; and
  • prepare students for active engagement with issues of social justice, oppression, and social welfare in local, state, regional, national, and global goals.

The program draws on a liberal arts perspective; social and behavioral science theory; social research; social policy development, analysis, and implementation; culturally competent intervention and prevention approaches in working with individuals, families, small groups, organizations, and communities; social integration; multiple systems assessment and evaluation; and knowledge pertaining to diversity.

Consistent with CSWE standards, the program views dimensions of diversity as intersections of multiple factors, including age, class, color, culture, disability, ethnicity, gender, gender-identity and expression, immigration status, political ideology, race, religion, sex, and sexual orientation. Students learn that, as a consequence of difference, a person's life experiences may include oppression, poverty, marginalization, and alienation as well as privilege, power, and acclaim.

Knowledge and practice in social work values and ethics is also an integral part of students' education. Knowledge and skill related to the evaluation of practice are integrated throughout the curriculum, beginning in SSW:2222 (042:022) Introduction to Social Work, continuing through practice and research courses, and culminating in the field experience and field seminar.

ADMISSION TO THE MAJOR

The School of Social Work endeavors to maintain a heterogeneous student body by enrolling students who represent diverse backgrounds and cultural perspectives.

A limited number of students are admitted to the major each year. The application deadline is March 1. Admission to the undergraduate program in social work requires:

completion of SSW:2222 (042:022) Introduction to Social Work with a grade of C or higher during the sophomore year;

a cumulative g.p.a. of at least 2.50 (exceptions may be made for persons who do not meet the grade-point average requirement if they are strong candidates on the basis of other criteria); and

completion of application forms and statement.

Students should complete SSW:2222 (042:022) Introduction to Social Work and apply to the major during their sophomore year. Students who apply during their junior year and are admitted must expect to complete an additional summer session, or more, in order to fulfill the requirements of the major.

Meeting the admission requirements above does not guarantee admission. Admission often is limited by available instructional resources and opportunities for field placement. The school does not grant academic credit for life experience or previous work experience.

For more information about admission policies, contact the undergraduate director or admissions director at the School of Social Work.

SOCIAL WORK INTEREST

Students who are interested in applying to the social work major may declare a social work interest at any time after they enroll at the University and before they earn more than 72 s.h. of credit, and preferably while they still will have time to enter and complete the major in a total of four years of study. Students may not declare a social work interest after they have earned 72 s.h., even if they already have declared another major.

Declaration of a social work interest qualifies students with at least sophomore standing to be advised by social work faculty and to participate in the Social Work Student Association and other School of Social Work activities, but it does not allow them to register for courses required specifically for the major.

Students may continue their social work interest standing until they are admitted to the major or until they have earned more than 72 s.h. of credit.

SOCIAL WORK COURSES IN DES MOINES

In addition to its on-campus undergraduate program in Iowa City, the School of Social Work offers social work courses for the Bachelor of Arts through its program in Des Moines. Students in the Des Moines program take courses in sequence, completing the social work courses required for the degree in two years. Courses are offered in a classroom setting. Students may complete other requirements for the Bachelor of Arts in online and/or classroom course work. The Des Moines program is approved by the Council on Social Work Education. For more information about the social work program in Des Moines, contact the University of Iowa School of Social Work admissions director.

Bachelor of Arts

The Bachelor of Arts with a major in social work requires a minimum of 120 s.h., including at least 64-69 s.h. of work for the major (a minimum of 36-39 s.h. in social work courses, 16-18 s.h. in cognate areas, and 12 s.h. in social work electives or in a concentration area). Students must maintain a g.p.a. of at least 2.00 in all courses for the major and in all UI courses for the major. They also must complete the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences General Education Program.

Students must complete SSW:2222 (042:022) Introduction to Social Work (4 s.h.) to be admitted to the major and before enrolling in the remaining social work courses required for the major.

Many students use the major's required course BIOL:1140 (002:021) Human Biology as partial fulfillment of the General Education Program's Natural Sciences requirement.

The major in social work requires the following course work.

SOCIAL WORK

All of these:

SSW:2222 (042:022) Introduction to Social Work4 s.h.
SSW:3840 (042:140) Human Behavior in the Social Environment4 s.h.
SSW:3841 (042:141) Fundamentals of Social Work Practice3 s.h.
SSW:3842 (042:142) Interpersonal Skills Laboratory2 s.h.
SSW:3844 (042:144) Introduction to Social Work Research4 s.h.
SSW:3845 (042:171) Social Work Processes4 s.h.
SSW:3847 (042:147) Discrimination, Oppression, and Diversity3 s.h.
SSW:4189 (042:189) Field Experience Seminar1 s.h.
SSW:4193 (042:193) Field Experience8-11 s.h.
SSW:4843 (042:143) Social Welfare Policy and Practice3 s.h.
COGNATE AREAS

Natural and social sciences—all of these:

BIOL:1140 (002:021) Human Biology4 s.h.
POLI:1100 (030:001) Introduction to American Politics3 s.h.
PSY:1001 (031:001) Elementary Psychology3 s.h.
SOC:1010 (034:001) Introduction to Sociology Principles3-4 s.h.

Social science or quantitative studies—one of these:

ANTH:1101 (113:003) Cultural Anthropology3 s.h.
ANTH:2100 (113:010) Anthropology and Contemporary World Problems3 s.h.
ECON:1100 (06E:001) Principles of Microeconomics4 s.h.
ECON:1200 (06E:002) Principles of Macroeconomics4 s.h.
STAT:1010 (22S:002) Statistics and Society3 s.h.
STAT:1020 (22S:025) Elementary Statistics and Inference3 s.h.
CONCENTRATION AREA

Students complete a minimum of 12 s.h. of elective courses in social work or in one of the concentration areas listed below. Students who wish to complete a concentration area not listed below must present a written request and rationale to the faculty advisor and undergraduate coordinator. Courses used to fulfill other requirements for the major or for the General Education Program do not count toward the 12 s.h. required for the concentration area.

African American studies
Aging studies
American studies
Anthropology
Business
Child life and therapeutic recreation
Communication studies
Critical cultural competence
Economics
Education
English
Gender, women's, and sexuality studies
Health promotion
History
Journalism and mass communication
Political science
Psychology
Religious studies
Sociology
Spanish
Sport studies

Recommended Course Sequence

The school recommends that students complete required course work in the following sequence. Most social work courses are offered only once each year.

FIRST AND SECOND YEARS
 
SSW:2222 (042:022) Introduction to Social Work4 s.h.
BIOL:1140 (002:021) Human Biology4 s.h.
POLI:1100 (030:001) Introduction to American Politics3 s.h.
PSY:1001 (031:001) Elementary Psychology3 s.h.
SOC:1010 (034:001) Introduction to Sociology Principles3-4 s.h.
One social science or quantitative elective course3-4 s.h.
THIRD YEAR
 
SSW:3840 (042:140) Human Behavior in the Social Environment4 s.h.
SSW:3844 (042:144) Introduction to Social Work Research4 s.h.
SSW:3845 (042:171) Social Work Processes4 s.h.
SSW:3847 (042:147) Discrimination, Oppression, and Diversity3 s.h.
FOURTH YEAR
 
SSW:3841 (042:141) Fundamentals of Social Work Practice3 s.h.
SSW:3842 (042:142) Interpersonal Skills Laboratory2 s.h.
SSW:4189 (042:189) Field Experience Seminar1 s.h.
SSW:4193 (042:193) Field Experience8-11 s.h.
SSW:4843 (042:143) Social Welfare Policy and Practice3 s.h.

Four-Year Graduation Plan

The following checkpoints list the minimum requirements students must complete by certain semesters in order to stay on the University's Four-Year Graduation Plan. (Courses in the major are those required to complete the major; they may be offered by departments other than the major department.)

Admission to the major in social work is selective. The four-year graduation plan applies only to students who are admitted by the beginning of their fifth semester.

Before the fifth semester begins: four courses in the major (may include concentration area courses) and admission to the major

Before the seventh semester begins: six more courses in the major and at least 90 s.h. earned toward the degree

Before the eighth semester begins: four or five more courses in the major and finalized field placement

During the eighth semester: enrollment in all remaining course work in the major, all remaining General Education courses, and a sufficient number of semester hours to graduate

Honors in the Major

Students majoring in social work have the opportunity to graduate with honors in the major. Honors students do in-depth study in areas that interest them. They must maintain a cumulative University of Iowa g.p.a. of at least 3.33 to participate in the program. Consult the School of Social Work for more information about graduating with honors in the major.

In addition to honors in their majors, undergraduate students have a variety of opportunities for honors study and activities through membership in the University of Iowa Honors Program; visit Honors at Iowa to learn about the University's honors program.

Minor

The minor in social work requires a minimum of 15 s.h. in social work courses, including 12 s.h. in courses numbered 3000 or above taken at The University of Iowa. Students must maintain a cumulative g.p.a. of at least 2.00 in all courses for the minor and in all UI courses for the minor. Course work in the minor may not be taken pass/nonpass. The minor must include SSW:2222 (042:022) Introduction to Social Work (or for transfer students, an equivalent course from another institution). Contact the School of Social Work undergraduate program director or program administrator for more information.

Certificate in Aging Studies

The School of Social Work administers the Aging Studies Program, which offers a certificate for undergraduate and graduate students and a minor for undergraduates; see Aging Studies in the Catalog.

Certificate in Critical Cultural Competence

The School of Social Work administers the undergraduate certificate program in critical cultural competence; see Critical Cultural Competence in the Catalog.

Graduate Programs of Study

  • Master of Social Work (thesis or nonthesis)
  • Doctor of Philosophy in social work

The Master of Social Work program has been accredited by the Council on Social Work Education continuously since 1951.

LICENSURE FOR WORK IN IOWA

Licensure is mandatory for master's-level social workers in Iowa.  For more information, see Iowa Board of Social Work on the Iowa Department of Public Health web site.

SCHOOL SOCIAL WORK ENDORSEMENT

The school cooperates with the College of Education and the State Department of Education to provide curricula that meet requirements for school social work endorsement in Iowa.

Master of Social Work

The Master of Social Work requires 60 s.h. of graduate credit; the requirement is 48 s.h. for students who hold an undergraduate degree in social work from a program accredited by the Council on Social Work Education. The degree is offered with or without thesis. An optional specialization in end-of-life care is available.

The goals of the M.S.W. program are to:

  • prepare students to shape the profession's future by providing education in family-based, community-based, and culturally competent practice approaches using the person-in-environment framework; and
  • prepare competent professionals for autonomous practice and leadership within the professional community; autonomous practice and leadership include advanced interventions at multiple system levels, supervision, program development, program administration, training, evaluation of practice, dissemination of new models of practice, and policy development.

The school offers the M.S.W. program on the University's Iowa City campus and at three off-campus sites: Des Moines and Sioux City, Iowa, and the Quad Cities area of Iowa and Illinois (see "M.S.W. Off Campus" below). Each site provides the required structured sequence of courses and includes opportunities for students to individualize their plans of study. All sites give students access to the resources of an RU/VH Research University.

Requirements for the M.S.W. include 27 s.h. in foundation-level courses and 33 s.h. in advanced courses. All students must earn a minimum of 36 s.h. after admission to the M.S.W. program. Students may count a maximum of 9-12 s.h. of credit from previous graduate work toward the M.S.W.

All M.S.W. students follow a structured sequence of courses. They must obtain permission to revise their plan, and they must complete the degree within a maximum of four years. All students must maintain a cumulative g.p.a. of at least 3.00 and must be promoted and each semester in compliance with the school's student advancement policy.

The full-time M.S.W. program must be completed in five semesters, beginning in fall and including summer session. Full-time students complete the degree in the spring semester of their second year. Students whose degree requirement is 48 s.h. may enroll full-time or part-time their first semester, following the sequenced plan.

Full-time study and a four-year part-time program are available in Iowa City and Des Moines. A three-year sequence of courses is available at all sites, although the Sioux City and Quad Cities sites admit new entering classes only on a three-year cycle.

Following is an outline of the full-time 60 s.h. program. For information about the three-year and four-year part-time sequences, contact the School of Social Work.

FIRST-YEAR: FOUNDATION
Fall Semester
SSW:3840 (042:140) Human Behavior in the Social Environment3 s.h.
SSW:3847 (042:147) Discrimination, Oppression, and Diversity3 s.h.
SSW:6146 (042:146) Computer Laboratory1 s.h.
SSW:6148 (042:148) Research Practice I3 s.h.
SSW:6150 (042:150) Social Work Practice with Individuals, Families, and Groups3 s.h.
SSW:6151 (042:151) Social Work Practice Skills Laboratory2 s.h.
Spring Semester
SSW:4843 (042:143) Social Welfare Policy and Practice3 s.h.
SSW:6145 (042:145) Organization and Community Practice3 s.h.
SSW:6290 (042:290) Foundation Practicum in Social Work3 s.h.
SSW:6291 (042:291) Foundation Practicum Seminar1 s.h.
SSW:7270 (042:270) Research Practice II3 s.h.
Summer Session
Electives (including preplacement field practice courses)9 s.h.
SECOND-YEAR: CONCENTRATION
Fall Semester
Elective3 s.h.

One of these:

SSW:7250 (042:250) Family-Centered Theory and Practice I3 s.h.
SSW:7260 (042:260) Integrated Social Work Theory and Practice I3 s.h.

One of these:

SSW:7292 (042:292) Advanced Practicum in Family-Centered Practice I and II5-6 s.h.
SSW:7295 (042:295) Advanced Practicum in Integrated Practice5-6 s.h.

One of these:

SSW:7293 (042:293) Advanced Practicum Seminar in Family-Centered Practice I1 s.h.
SSW:7297 (042:297) Advanced Practicum Seminar in Integrated Practice I1 s.h.
Spring Semester

One of these:

SSW:7251 (042:251) Family-Centered Theory and Practice II3 s.h.
SSW:7261 (042:261) Integrated Social Work Theory and Practice II3 s.h.

One of these:

SSW:7252 (042:252) Advanced Social Policy for Family Practice3 s.h.
SSW:7262 (042:262) Advanced Social Policy for Integrated Practice3 s.h.

One of these:

SSW:7292 (042:292) Advanced Practicum in Family-Centered Practice I and II5-6 s.h.
SSW:7295 (042:295) Advanced Practicum in Integrated Practice5-6 s.h.

One of these:

SSW:7294 (042:294) Advanced Practicum Seminar in Family-Centered Practice II1 s.h.
SSW:7298 (042:298) Advanced Practicum Seminar in Integrated Practice II1 s.h.

Concentrations

In the advanced year of the master's program, students choose one of two concentrations: family-centered practice or integrated practice. These advanced specialized curricula build on the school's liberal arts perspective and on the professional foundation. Both are based on a comprehensive eco-systemic theoretical perspective, and both apply the principles that are part of the school's mission statement, with a focus on culturally competent family-centered and community-based approaches.

FAMILY-CENTERED PRACTICE

The family-centered practice concentration teaches knowledge and skills necessary for advanced social work practice with individuals and families. These include clinical practice methods that mobilize and develop clients' coping skills, empowering them to manage difficult situations, and culturally sensitive methods for collaborating with clients, their families, and other professionals in planning interventions. Students also learn about advocating for clients, facilitating client self-advocacy, coordinating services to meet multiple needs, and influencing social policy on behalf of clients.

The concentration prepares students to work with individuals and families at appropriate levels of intensity, mobilize existing strengths, and enhance coping skills. Using principles of family-centered practice, students learn to take community and larger systems into account while working in partnership with individuals and families in all aspects of assessment and intervention planning. The concentration emphasizes sensitivity to a variety of family forms and to cultural diversity within family forms. "Family" is broadly defined to include step families, single-parent families, same-sex-couple families, grandparent-as-parent families, adult parent-adult child families, and traditional forms of families.

INTEGRATED PRACTICE

The integrated practice concentration teaches methods of advanced practice that empower organizational and community change at multiple system levels. Students learn skills for assessment, planning, and direct intervention in larger systems such as neighborhoods, social support networks, and service delivery systems, and for policy making. They develop skills for a broad range of interventions, including direct practice, case management, community education, community development and practice, management and administration, organizational and interorganizational planning and program development, team building, organization and program evaluation, and social policy advocacy. They also learn culturally sensitive methods to collaborate with families and communities; identify strengths, assets, and challenges; and develop services and programs that will meet clients' needs.

Building on strengths and assets of organizations and communities, students learn how to mobilize community members in advocacy and change efforts—skills useful for case managers, service coordinators, supervisors, program planners and developers, and administrators. Students also learn how to apply advanced skills to advocacy, community assessment, planning and mobilizing resources, and influencing social policy.

The concentration prepares students for practice in varied settings, including hospitals and community health programs, schools, mental health centers, neighborhood and family resource centers, community- and family-based community service agencies, correctional facilities, and programs that serve the elderly, both in the community and in care facilities. In many of these settings, social workers work as interdisciplinary team members and team leaders within organizations. They also collaborate with community organizations, community residents, and service providers. Many social workers are involved in staff supervision, program development, and agency administration. Content areas include grant writing; intervention in multiple systems, including team and network building; policy practice; and design of evaluation methods for client assessment and program evaluation.

Admission

The school seeks to maintain a heterogeneous student body by enrolling students who represent diverse backgrounds and cultural perspectives. Previous experience in human services and cross-cultural experiences is desirable. The school does not grant academic credit for life experience or previous work experience.

Admission to the M.S.W. program requires a bachelor's degree from an accredited college or university, with a reasonable distribution of courses in the liberal arts and sciences (the humanities and the social, behavioral, and biological sciences). Applicants should have an undergraduate g.p.a. of 3.00 or higher, or a g.p.a. of 3.00 or higher on 12 s.h. of letter-graded graduate course work; consult the University's Office of Admissions for help in calculating grade-point average. Competence with word processing and spreadsheet application on personal computers is required.

Applicants whose first language is not English must score at least 100 (Internet-based) on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL).

Applicants must submit three letters of recommendation, including one regarding academic abilities and one from the applicant's most recent employer (if the employment was social work-related); and a personal statement addressing criteria specified by the School of Social Work.

Applications are accepted beginning September 1 and must be completed by February 1 to be considered for the next academic year.

Applicants must meet the admission requirements of the Graduate College; see the Manual of Rules and Regulations of the Graduate College or the Graduate College section of the Catalog.

For a complete statement of graduate admission policies, contact the School of Social Work.

Financial Support

Students seeking financial assistance should apply for aid through The University of Iowa Office of Student Financial Aid. Students may apply for a limited number of research and teaching assistantships available from the School of Social Work. Application materials for research or teaching assistantships are available from the school each spring, or as positions become available. Aid received through the Office of Student Financial Aid does not preclude students from consideration for aid through the School of Social Work.

M.S.W. Off Campus

The School of Social Work delivers the M.S.W. curriculum to three off-campus sites: Des Moines and Sioux City, Iowa, and the Quad Cities area of Iowa and Illinois. Each site is administered by the School of Social Work in cooperation with the Division of Continuing Education. Social work faculty members teach required courses at each center and are available for student advising. The off-campus programs have been evaluated by the Council on Social Work Education and The University of Iowa Graduate Council as providing a program comparable to that available on the Iowa City campus.

Courses at each off-campus site are taught in classrooms by tenure-track, clinical, visiting, and adjunct faculty members. Instructional connections between sites are maintained through varied technologies, including computer-based instruction.

For program entry and application dates, contact the School of Social Work.

Des Moines Center

The John and Mary Pappajohn Education Center is located in Des Moines, in central Iowa. It offers courses sequenced to accommodate both part-time and full-time study. Students may complete the entire degree program at the Des Moines center, although they may travel to Iowa City for selected elective courses offered during the summer.

Quad Cities Center

Students in the Quad Cities part-time program can complete their degree entirely off-campus with the exception of some electives, which they can take during summer sessions in Iowa City or at other area colleges and universities. The School offers this part-time program to a cohort admitted once every three years. In addition to the part-time cohort students, there are some full- or part-time students from Iowa City in practicum in the Quad Cities. The Quad Cities program is located in the Davenport/Bettendorf area on Iowa's eastern border.

Sioux City Center

The Sioux City part-time program is nearly identical to the Quad Cities part-time program.  Most courses are offered in classroom space at Briar Cliff University in Sioux City.

Joint M.S.W./Ph.D. in Social Work

The school offers a joint Master of Social Work/Doctor of Philosophy in social work for students who have completed course work in research and statistics and have postbaccalaureate experience related to social work practice. The joint program permits students to apply a limited amount of credit toward both graduate degrees, reducing the time required to graduate. Individuals interested in the joint program must apply to the M.S.W. program and the Ph.D. program; applications are reviewed by the admissions panels of both programs. For more information, contact the School of Social Work.

Joint M.S.W./Degrees in Other Disciplines

The School of Social Work collaborates with the College of Law to offer the joint Juris Doctor/Master of Social Work. It also collaborates with the School of Urban and Regional Planning to offer the joint Master of Social Work/Master of Arts or Master of Science in urban and regional planning. Each program permits students to apply up to 12 s.h. of graduate credit toward both degrees, reducing the time required to graduate. Applicants must apply to each program separately and be admitted to each one before they may be admitted to the joint degree program. For information about the law and planning programs, see Juris Doctor (College of Law) and Urban and Regional Planning (Graduate College) in the Catalog.

Similar arrangements may be made with other departments. Academic units in which social work students have pursued joint degrees include the Tippie College of Business, the College of Education, the Department of American Studies, the Department of Religious Studies, and the School of Journalism and Mass Communication. Social work students are encouraged to take courses in other departments whether or not they are pursuing joint degrees.

M.S.W. Professional Association

Graduates of accredited M.S.W. programs may be eligible for associate membership in the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy (AAMFT) upon fulfilling certain curriculum requirements at the graduate level. Courses are not automatically accepted; graduates need to demonstrate that specific courses meet the AAMFT's requirements, usually by sending course outlines.

Doctor of Philosophy

The Doctor of Philosophy program in social work requires a minimum of 86 s.h. of graduate credit. The program prepares students to conduct research that contributes to the knowledge base of social work, to become leaders in the profession, and to teach social work in postsecondary educational institutions.

Doctoral students develop close working relationships with faculty members who have achieved national recognition in areas such as child welfare, diversity and cultural competence, gerontology, social policy, and mental health.

The Ph.D. offers students a coherent program of study with opportunities to pursue their own scholarly interests. Each student's program of study must be approved by his or her advisor.

Students complete required course work and research and teaching practicums; pass a comprehensive exam; and write a dissertation and defend it in an oral exam. Their work includes courses in one of three outside disciplines: sociology, psychology, or public health. This course work helps to prepare them for the comprehensive examination and dissertation defense.

Students who enter the program with an M.S.W. are granted credit for 30 s.h. and must complete an additional 56 s.h. for the degree. Individuals with master's degrees in related disciplines (e.g., psychology, sociology) may choose to earn a Ph.D. in social work without first earning the M.S.W. Credit from a related master's degree may be applied to the Ph.D., as determined case-by-case by the School of Social Work.

The Ph.D. in social work requires the following course work.

FOUNDATION COURSES

Doctoral students without the M.S.W. must take the following four foundation courses during their first year of study. Students may waive one or more of these courses if they can show that they have completed comparable courses and can pass an applicable exam.

SSW:3840 (042:140) Human Behavior in the Social Environment3-4 s.h.
SSW:3847 (042:147) Discrimination, Oppression, and Diversity3 s.h.
SSW:4843 (042:143) Social Welfare Policy and Practice3 s.h.
SSW:6148 (042:148) Research Practice I3 s.h.
CORE COURSES

All Ph.D. students must complete the following core courses.

SSW:7800 (042:300) Social Work Proseminar1 s.h.
SSW:7801 (042:301) Knowledge Building in Social Work Practice3 s.h.
SSW:7803 (042:303) Social Work Research Practicum4 s.h.
SSW:7804 (042:304) Thesis Seminar3 s.h.
SSW:7806 (042:306) Social Work Teaching Practicum2 s.h.
SSW:7807 (042:307) Teaching Seminar1 s.h.
SSW:7815 (042:315) Developing Knowledge in Human Service Organizations3 s.h.
RESEARCH METHODS, STATISTICS, DATA ANALYSIS

Students earn 9 s.h. in research methods, statistics, and data analysis course work.

OUTSIDE DISCIPLINE REQUIREMENT

Students earn 12 s.h. in one outside discipline (psychology, sociology, or public health), as follows.

One methods course3 s.h.
One theory course3 s.h.
Two electives6 s.h.
ADDITIONAL ELECTIVES

Students earn 6 s.h. in elective course work (in addition to electives taken for the outside discipline requirement).

Admission

Students are admitted to the Ph.D. program only for full-time study. Admission requires a master's degree in social work from a program accredited by the Council on Social Work Education (CSWE) or a master's degree in a related field. Prospective students also may apply to the M.S.W./Ph.D. program.

The school makes special efforts to recruit students from underrepresented minorities, especially Iowa residents. The program accepts up to five students each year.

Applicants must meet the admission requirements of the Graduate College; see the Manual of Rules and Regulations of the Graduate College or the Graduate College section of the Catalog.

Applicants must have taken the Graduate Record Exam (GRE) General Test and should have their scores sent to The University of Iowa. A score of at least 575 on both the verbal and quantitative sections, or a composite score of 1150, is preferred for individuals who took the old GRE. A score of at least 158 on the verbal section and at least 147 on the quantitative section, or a composite score of at least 305, is preferred for those who took the revised GRE. The School of Social Work has not established a minimum analytic writing score.

Applicants also must submit a completed Graduate College application form; undergraduate transcript (an undergraduate g.p.a. of at least 3.00 and an introductory statistics course are required); graduate transcript; a personal statement of professional goals, including area of interest and reason for pursuing the Ph.D. (two to three pages); a résumé; a sample of scholarly writing (scholarly publication or research or theoretical paper); and three letters of recommendation (two must be academic references).

Applicants whose first language is not English must score at least 100 (Internet-based) on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL).

Applicants must submit the application form, fee, and other materials to the University's Office of Admissions. An application packet and list of guidelines are available from the admissions office and on the School of Social Work web site. The application is due February 1 for the following academic year.

Financial Support

Doctoral students are typically awarded two or three years of financial support from the School of Social Work, including research or teaching assistantships and fellowships. Students whose first language is not English must take the English Speaking Proficiency Assessment (ESPA) test in order to be considered for teaching assistantships. Assistants who hold appointments of one-quarter-time or more are assessed Iowa resident tuition, for which they receive a scholarship, and their computer fees and health insurance premiums are waived for each semester they hold an appointment during the academic year. For more information, see Cost of Attendance on the Office of Student Financial Aid web site.

Certificate in Aging Studies

The School of Social Work administers the Aging Studies Program, which offers a certificate for undergraduate and graduate students and a minor for undergraduates; see Aging Studies in the Catalog.

Projects, Seminars

Students may become involved in special projects such as the National Resource Center for Family-Centered Practice and the School of Social Work's programs in gerontology and in end-of-life care.

The school also offers students the opportunity to participate in travel/study seminars. Urban, rural, national, and international seminars are available.

Continuing Education

Nondegree students may enroll in selected courses and workshops offered on campus and online through the Division of Continuing Education and in off-campus programs offered by the School of Social Work. Students who complete continuing education work and later enroll in a degree program may be able to apply a limited amount of their continuing education work toward their degree requirements; applicable credit is determined by the School of Social Work. See Course Types on the Division of Continuing Education web site.

Courses

Lower-Level Undergraduate

SSW:1000 (042:029) First-Year Seminar1-2 s.h.
Small discussion class taught by a faculty member; topics chosen by instructor; may include outside activities (e.g., films, lectures, performances, readings, visits to research facilities). Requirements: first‑ or second‑semester standing.
 
SSW:1800 (042:085) Basic Aspects of Aging3 s.h.
Social, psychological, and biological aspects; demographics of aging, health, economic issues, primary relationships, social services. GE: Social Sciences. Same as LEIS:1800 (169:085), ASP:1800 (153:085), NURS:1800 (096:085), CSD:1800 (003:085).
 
SSW:2042 (042:042) Intercultural Communication3 s.h.
Culture defined as a system of taken‑for‑granted assumptions about the world that influence how people think and act; cultural differences that produce challenges and opportunities for understanding and communication; those differences from several theoretical perspectives; opportunities to examine culture and cultural differences in practical, experience‑driven ways. Prerequisites: COMM:1112 (036:012), COMM:1170 (036:070), COMM:1301 (036:001), or COMM:1305 (036:005), COMM:1117 (036:017) or COMM:1130 (036:030), and COMM:1168 (036:068) or COMM:1174 (036:074). Requirements: g.p.a. of at least 2.30 and completion of four of five Foundations of Communication courses. Same as IS:2042 (187:042), COMM:2042 (036:042).
 
SSW:2222 (042:022) Introduction to Social Work4 s.h.
Social welfare as a social institution; settings, methodologies of social work, practice; profession of social work; historical development of American social welfare, social work; a minimum of 45 hours volunteer work. Requirements: sophomore or higher standing. Same as SOC:2222 (034:022).
 

Upper-Level Undergraduate and Graduate

SSW:3135 (042:135) Global Aging3 s.h.
Demographic factors that contribute to the world wide phenomena of population aging in context of WHO Active Aging and the United Nation's Principles for Older Persons frameworks. Same as ASP:3135 (153:135), GHS:3050 (152:153).
 
SSW:3187 (042:187) Continuing Education: Individual Studyarr.
Project related to student interest carried out under direction of faculty member. Requirements: individual study contract.
 
SSW:3191 (042:191) Individual Studyarr.
Project related to student interest carried out under direction of faculty member.
 
SSW:3500 (042:157) Nonprofit Organizational Effectiveness I3 s.h.
Operational and financial aspects of nonprofit management; mission and governance of organization; strategic planning for effective management, including finance, budget, income generation, fund‑raising. Same as ENTR:3595 (06T:144), MUSM:3500 (024:147), NURS:3595 (096:168), MGMT:3500 (06J:147), RELS:3700 (032:127).
 
SSW:3501 (042:195) Introduction to Nursing Homes3 s.h.
Overview of nursing home roles in context of long‑term care system, characteristics of nursing home residents. Same as ASP:3501 (153:195).
 
SSW:3585 (042:285) Travel/Study Seminararr.
Opportunity for cross‑cultural learning through U.S. or international travel; focus on social welfare issues. Prerequisites: SSW:4843 (042:143).
 
SSW:3600 (042:158) Nonprofit Organizational Effectiveness II3 s.h.
Qualities for leadership of nonprofit organizations, including relationships with staff and volunteers; relationship of nonprofit and outside world; marketing, public relations, advocacy strategies for nonprofits. Same as MUSM:3600 (024:148), MGMT:3600 (06J:148), NURS:3600 (096:169), RELS:3701 (032:128).
 
SSW:3712 (042:112) Human Sexuality, Diversity, and Society1-3 s.h.
Physiological, psychological aspects; parameters defined by students, instructor. Same as NURS:3712 (096:112).
 
SSW:3729 (042:129) Substance Use and Abuse3 s.h.
Chemical dependency for helping professions; etiological, physiological, psychological, legal, sociological aspects; treatment methods. Requirements: junior or higher standing.
 
SSW:3753 (042:153) Programs and Services for Aging Adults3 s.h.
Major gerontological programs and services, practitioners' need for basic aging‑practice competence; aging network; income, employment, health maintenance programs; continuum of care (preventive and well‑elderly services, in‑home services, community‑based services, institutional care); assessment; major elder health issues, informal care; end‑of‑life care. Same as ASP:3753 (153:153).
 
SSW:3785 (042:185) Social Policy and the Elderly3 s.h.
Public social policies, their affect on well‑being of elderly, including women and minorities; U.S. and other nations' policies. Prerequisites: SSW:4843 (042:143). Requirements: an introductory course on aging, and junior or higher standing. Same as ASP:3785 (153:185).
 
SSW:3786 (042:186) Death/Dying: Issues Across the Life Span3 s.h.
Introduction to death and dying; historical, cultural, societal, personal perspectives. Same as ASP:3786 (153:186).
 
SSW:3796 (042:196) Family Violence2-3 s.h.
Child abuse and neglect, domestic violence, elder abuse; causes, policy aspects, identification, reporting, treatment, prevention.
 
SSW:3797 (042:197) Child Welfare Policy and Practice3 s.h.
Public and private child welfare practice and organizations in the United States; historical and legal aspects, co‑occurring issues, foster care, adoption, family preservation.
 
SSW:3799 (042:199) Selected Aspects of Social Work and Social Welfarearr.
Human behavior, practice, social welfare policy.
 
SSW:3840 (042:140) Human Behavior in the Social Environment3-4 s.h.
Behavior and development in context of social, ecological systems and human diversity; overview of biopsychosocial dimensions, individual behavior, and development throughout lifespan; contexts of diverse family, group, community, organization, and cultural systems.
 
SSW:3841 (042:141) Fundamentals of Social Work Practice3 s.h.
Professional practice: functions, roles, skills, conceptual frameworks, values, ethics; focus on integrated approach to practice, including assessment, intervention, evaluation of interventions, termination with individuals, families, groups; emphasis on empirically based practice. Corequisites: SSW:3840 (042:140), if not taken as a prerequisite. Requirements: admission to social work B.A. program.
 
SSW:3842 (042:142) Interpersonal Skills Laboratory2 s.h.
Practice of interpersonal skills required in the helping relationship. Corequisites: SSW:3841 (042:141), if not taken as a prerequisite. Requirements: admission to social work B.A. program.
 
SSW:3844 (042:144) Introduction to Social Work Research4 s.h.
Scientific approach to knowledge building, with emphasis on critical use of research; quantitative and qualitative methods, evaluation of practice, computerized data analysis, ethics and diversity in social work research. Requirements: admission to social work B.A. program.
 
SSW:3845 (042:171) Social Work Processes4 s.h.
Context of practice examined to understand structural factors that affect clients and communities; culturally competent practice using empowerment perspective. Corequisites: SSW:3840 (042:140), if not taken as a prerequisite. Requirements: admission to social work B.A. program.
 
SSW:3847 (042:147) Discrimination, Oppression, and Diversity3 s.h.
Theoretical and historical perspectives on racism, sexism, other forms of discrimination; applications to social work, culturally competent practice, change strategies. Requirements: admission to social work B.A. or M.S.W. program.
 
SSW:3904 (042:204) Human Services Administration2 s.h.
Effects of organizational structures/processes on individual performance; models of management, communication patterns, leadership styles; skill in technical writing, decision making, personnel and financial management, applied professional ethics. Requirements: completion of foundation courses.
 
SSW:4100 (042:180) Social Work in the Criminal Justice System3 s.h.
How social work practice intersects with different aspects of the criminal justice system; focus on integrating social work values into criminal justice field; social work's responsibility to address social justice problems (e.g., mental illness, racial disparity, gender, human rights) within criminal justice system; critical examination of past and present practices in criminal justice and implications for social work practice and policy when working with individuals in criminal justice system.
 
SSW:4130 (042:130) Family Development Specialist Model3 s.h.
Use of family development specialist model of family‑centered practice to facilitate improved family functioning, economic independence; relationship building, systems theory, family‑centered case management, conflict management, empowerment strategies. Requirements: completion of family development specialist certification course.
 
SSW:4155 (042:155) Treatment of Substance Use and Co-Occurring Disorders3 s.h.
Treatment of individuals presenting substance related issues (abuse, dependency, cooccurring disorders); etiological, physiological, psychological, legal, and sociological aspects; evaluation of current research and direct application of contemporary treatment modalities to client situations encountered as helping professionals. Recommendations: introductory course in substance abuse.
 
SSW:4188 (042:188) Continuing Education: Honorsarr.
Supervised individual research. Requirements: honors standing.
 
SSW:4189 (042:189) Field Experience Seminar1 s.h.
Opportunity for students to recount their experiences from generalist practice in agencies; application of knowledge, skills, and values of culturally competent social work. Corequisites: SSW:4193 (042:193). Requirements: completion of course work in the major.
 
SSW:4190 (042:190) Aging Studies Internship3 s.h.
Opportunities for students in various disciplines to relate their areas of study to older adults and aging; interdisciplinary relationships, approaches to meeting needs of older adults. Same as ASP:4190 (153:190).
 
SSW:4192 (042:192) Honors in Social Workarr.
Supervised individual research. Requirements: honors standing.
 
SSW:4193 (042:193) Field Experiencearr.
Supervised experience in selected social welfare organizations; application of knowledge and skill common to generalist practice in an agency setting. Corequisites: SSW:4189 (042:189). Requirements: completion of course work in the major and social work senior standing.
 
SSW:4216 (042:216) Group Facilitation in Human Sexuality0-3 s.h.
Principles of group dynamics, group process; leadership skills for small, task‑oriented discussion groups on human sexuality. Prerequisites: SSW:3712 (042:112). Same as NURS:4216 (096:216).
 
SSW:4843 (042:143) Social Welfare Policy and Practice3 s.h.
Basic social welfare policies and programs; economic, social, ideological, and political conditions that have influenced formation and implementation of social policy, current structure of major social welfare policies.
 

Graduate

SSW:5194 (042:194) Social Work Practice in Health Care Settings2 s.h.
Introduction to organization, provision of social work services in health care settings; practice issues such as models of intervention, ethical questions, impact of cultural diversity on health care. Prerequisites: SSW:3841 (042:141) or SSW:6150 (042:150).
 
SSW:5200 (042:200) Grief Work with Individuals and Families2-3 s.h.
Complexity of grief and its multifaceted impact on family systems; utilizing grief theories, including Worden's Tasks of Mourning, ambiguous loss theory, several family systems models; examination of multi‑generational dynamics that affect how we learn to grieve, how we experience grief, and how we live after a loss; acknowledged and unacknowledged grief and loss; generational family dynamics; difficulties and strengths passed from one generation to the next; assessing grief at individual, family, group, and community levels; how loss can affect personal well‑being and professional practice, particularly when working with an interdisciplinary team. Requirements: social work graduate standing.
 
SSW:5219 (042:219) Aging and the Family2-3 s.h.
Research related to aging and the family; intergenerational relations, marital status in later life, diversity of older families, caregiving, elder abuse, policy issues. Same as ASP:5219 (153:219).
 
SSW:5240 (042:240) Trauma Informed Family Practice3 s.h.
Theory, knowledge, and skills informing evidence‑based assessment and intervention for traumatized children and adolescents in child welfare system, including those exposed to abuse, neglect, witnessing interpersonal crime (e.g., domestic violence, community violence); family events within their ecological context , various family forms, cultural patterns; controversial issues in child welfare, conclusions based on scholarly research, presentation of conclusions in professional oral and written form.
 
SSW:5254 (042:254) Introductory Seminar: End-Of-Life Services in Rural Communities2-3 s.h.
Basic principles of hospice and palliative care, rural service delivery, community assessment.
 
SSW:6145 (042:145) Organization and Community Practice3 s.h.
Models that underlie theories of organization, community practice; principles of macro social work and skill development in relationship building, needs assessment, decision making, planning, implementing, ethics, program and self‑evaluation. Requirements: admission to M.S.W. program.
 
SSW:6146 (042:146) Computer Laboratory1 s.h.
Use of microcomputers in social work practice; user skill, software for a variety of applications in social service settings. Requirements: admission to M.S.W. program.
 
SSW:6148 (042:148) Research Practice I3 s.h.
Knowledge and skills for evaluating practice and carrying out social work research; formulation of research questions; research design and methodology; sampling techniques; protection of human subjects; descriptive statistics; computerized data analysis. Requirements: admission to M.S.W. program.
 
SSW:6150 (042:150) Social Work Practice with Individuals, Families, and Groups3 s.h.
Models and underlying theories of empirically based direct social work practice; emphasis on an ecosystem strengths perspective; phases of helping relationship, strengths‑based assessment, change process in interpersonal helping relationships. Prerequisites: SSW:3840 (042:140). Requirements: admission to M.S.W. program; concurrent enrollment in SSW:6151 (042:151), SSW:6290 (042:290), and SSW:6291 (042:291) for students who have completed 60 s.h.
 
SSW:6151 (042:151) Social Work Practice Skills Laboratory2 s.h.
Interpersonal skills practice in the helping relationship; small‑group format. Corequisites: SSW:6150 (042:150), SSW:6290 (042:290), and SSW:6291 (042:291), if not taken as prerequisites. Requirements: admission to M.S.W. program.
 
SSW:6220 (042:220) Family Law3 s.h.
Legal systems, rights, processes related to families; marriage, divorce, custody, protective services, reproductive rights, adoption, commitment, delinquency, education, poverty, discrimination; roles of lawyers, social workers in legal system. Prerequisites: SSW:4843 (042:143).
 
SSW:6224 (042:224) Spirituality and Ethics in Social Work2-3 s.h.
Knowledge, values, and skills that provide a framework for spiritually sensitive social work practice; preparation for responding competently and ethically to diverse spiritual perspectives, for recognizing and reflecting on one's own spiritual beliefs, and for identifying appropriate ways to apply personal beliefs to practice with varied populations while safeguarding client autonomy and self‑determination.
 
SSW:6228 (042:228) Theories of Personality and Psychopathology2 s.h.
Theories and their relevance to social work practice with diverse populations. Prerequisites: SSW:3840 (042:140). Requirements: social work graduate standing.
 
SSW:6229 (042:229) Working with Groups2 s.h.
Theory and practice of group work, group process, leadership styles and skills; fundamental theory, skills necessary to form and facilitate a small group. Requirements: completion of foundation courses.
 
SSW:6232 (042:232) Therapy with Couples2 s.h.
Married and other couples as social systems; theories of functional, dysfunctional systems; techniques of intervention. Requirements: completion of foundation courses.
 
SSW:6233 (042:233) School Social Work Practice2 s.h.
School as a social institution; activities of school social worker; theoretical, practice issues; current issues in field.
 
SSW:6234 (042:234) Social Work Practice and Use of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders3 s.h.
Major categories of psychopathology, DSM‑IV system of classification; individual behavior and presentation of symptoms considered through DSM‑IV multiaxial approach to diagnosis; effects of culture, developmental stage, and gender on presentation of mental disorders.
 
SSW:6236 (042:236) Interventions with Individuals2 s.h.
Comparison of two or more intervention theories and approaches used in social work practice with individuals; attention to diverse populations and across life span. Requirements: completion of foundation courses.
 
SSW:6237 (042:237) Social Work Practice with Children, Youth, and Families2 s.h.
Preparation for practice in child welfare, family service agencies; family life cycle, child development, child maltreatment, problems of adolescence, social services for families and children, legal issues. Requirements: completion of foundation courses.
 
SSW:6238 (042:238) Introduction to Play Therapy2 s.h.
Major theories and techniques of play therapy, relevance to social work practice. Prerequisites: SSW:6150 (042:150).
 
SSW:6247 (042:247) Nonprofit Organizational Effectiveness I3 s.h.
Operational and financing aspects of nonprofit management; mission and governance of organization; strategic planning for effective management, including finance, budget, income generation, fund‑raising. Same as SLIS:6430 (021:263), MGMT:9150 (06J:247), LAW:8751 (091:320), HMP:6360 (174:247), URP:6278 (102:278), MUSM:6010 (024:247), SPST:6010 (028:257), RELS:6070 (032:227).
 
SSW:6248 (042:248) Nonprofit Organizational Effectiveness II3 s.h.
Qualities for leadership of nonprofit organizations, including relationships with staff and volunteers; relationship of nonprofit and outside world; marketing, public relations, advocacy strategies for nonprofits. Requirements: for LAW:8752 (091:322)LAW:8751 (091:320); for HMP:6365 (174:248)HMP:6360 (174:247) or MGMT:9150 (06J:247) or MUSM:6010 (024:247). Same as MGMT:9160 (06J:248), LAW:8752 (091:322), SLIS:6435 (021:265), HMP:6365 (174:248), URP:6279 (102:279), MUSM:6020 (024:248), SPST:6020 (028:258), RELS:6075 (032:228).
 
SSW:6281 (042:281) Social Work Practice: Selected Aspectsarr.
Topics not covered in another course; diversity, social justice and ethics issues related to a social work practice area.
 
SSW:6282 (042:282) Grant Writing1-2 s.h.
Same as URP:6282 (102:282).
 
SSW:6290 (042:290) Foundation Practicum in Social Work3 s.h.
Generalist practice experience with individuals, families, small groups, organizations, communities; communication skills, change process, professional values and ethics applied at multiple system levels; students evaluate their own practice using a learning contract in an agency setting. Corequisites: SSW:3840 (042:140), SSW:3847 (042:147), SSW:4843 (042:143), SSW:6145 (042:145), SSW:6146 (042:146), SSW:6150 (042:150), SSW:6151 (042:151), and SSW:6291 (042:291); if not taken as prerequisites. Requirements: admission to M.S.W. program.
 
SSW:6291 (042:291) Foundation Practicum Seminar1 s.h.
Integration of academic, experiential learning; self‑assessment, peer feedback to promote model of professional accountability. Corequisites: SSW:3840 (042:140), SSW:3847 (042:147), SSW:4843 (042:143), SSW:6145 (042:145), SSW:6146 (042:146), SSW:6150 (042:150), SSW:6151 (042:151), and SSW:6290 (042:290); if not taken as prerequisites. Requirements: admission to M.S.W. program.
 
SSW:7250 (042:250) Family-Centered Theory and Practice I3 s.h.
Theoretical bases for family‑centered practice; comparison and analysis; skill development in analyzing problem situations, implementing change strategies. Requirements: completion of M.S.W. foundation courses.
 
SSW:7251 (042:251) Family-Centered Theory and Practice II3 s.h.
Techniques for assessment, intervention in family‑centered practice; evaluation of practice; theoretical and clinical bases for intervention. Prerequisites: SSW:7250 (042:250).
 
SSW:7252 (042:252) Advanced Social Policy for Family Practice3 s.h.
Systematic basis for examining social, economic, and political factors that influence formation of social policies; social policy implementation, impact of social policies on vulnerable individuals and families. Requirements: completion of M.S.W. foundation courses.
 
SSW:7255 (042:255) Integrative Seminar in End-of-Life Care1 s.h.
Integration of students' knowledge, skills, and values for practice in end‑of‑life care and bereavement; application to case studies and advanced practicum setting. Corequisites: SSW:7292 (042:292) or SSW:7295 (042:295). Requirements: admission to end‑of‑life care area.
 
SSW:7260 (042:260) Integrated Social Work Theory and Practice I3 s.h.
Theories, skill development, evaluation, ethical issues in integrated social work practice; intermediate group work for culturally competent intervention; small task groups. Requirements: completion of foundation courses.
 
SSW:7261 (042:261) Integrated Social Work Theory and Practice II3 s.h.
Continuation of SSW:7260 (042:260); theories, skills evaluation, ethical issues; advanced group work for culturally competent intervention; case management, program development, funding evaluation, large task groups. Prerequisites: SSW:7260 (042:260).
 
SSW:7262 (042:262) Advanced Social Policy for Integrated Practice3 s.h.
Systematic basis for critical examination of social, economic, and political factors that influence formation of social policies; social policy implementation, impact of social policies on vulnerable populations, service providers, communities. Requirements: completion of M.S.W. foundation courses.
 
SSW:7268 (042:268) Continuing Education: Individual Studyarr.
Project related to student interest; directed by faculty member. Requirements: completion of course contract.
 
SSW:7269 (042:269) Continuing Education: Thesisarr.
Thesis research project.
 
SSW:7270 (042:270) Research Practice II2-3 s.h.
Research project relevant to social work practice that builds on knowledge and skills developed in SSW:6148 (042:148); data analysis, report of results; ethical principles applied to research. Prerequisites: SSW:6148 (042:148). Requirements: admission to M.S.W. program.
 
SSW:7271 (042:271) Individual Studyarr.
Project related to student interest; directed by faculty member.
 
SSW:7272 (042:272) Thesisarr.
 
SSW:7292 (042:292) Advanced Practicum in Family-Centered Practice I and IIarr.
Family‑centered practice theory and skills implemented in interventions with individuals, families; two semester field course. Corequisites: SSW:7250 (042:250), SSW:7251 (042:251), SSW:7252 (042:252), and SSW:7270 (042:270), if not taken as prerequisites. Requirements: completion of M.S.W. foundation courses, and concurrent enrollment in SSW:7293 (042:293) or SSW:7294 (042:294).
 
SSW:7293 (042:293) Advanced Practicum Seminar in Family-Centered Practice I1 s.h.
Two‑semester field course; family‑centered practice theory and skills implemented in interventions with individuals, families. Corequisites: SSW:7292 (042:292). Requirements: completion of M.S.W. foundation courses.
 
SSW:7294 (042:294) Advanced Practicum Seminar in Family-Centered Practice II1 s.h.
Continuation of SSW:7293 (042:293). Prerequisites: SSW:7293 (042:293). Corequisites: SSW:7292 (042:292).
 
SSW:7295 (042:295) Advanced Practicum in Integrated Practicearr.
Integrated social work theories and interventions implemented in work with individuals, families, organizations, formal and informal networks; two semester field course. Corequisites: SSW:7260 (042:260), SSW:7261 (042:261), SSW:7262 (042:262), and SSW:7270 (042:270); if not taken as prerequisites. Requirements: completion of M.S.W. foundation courses; for fall semester — concurrent enrollment in SSW:7297 (042:297) or SSW:7298 (042:298).
 
SSW:7296 (042:296) Advanced Practicum in School Social Workarr.
Field course; social work theories and interventions implemented in schools. Corequisites: SSW:7250 (042:250) or SSW:7260 (042:260), SSW:7251 (042:251) or SSW:7261 (042:261), and SSW:7252 (042:252) or SSW:7262 (042:262); if not taken as prerequisites. Requirements: completion of M.S.W. foundation courses.
 
SSW:7297 (042:297) Advanced Practicum Seminar in Integrated Practice I1 s.h.
Two‑semester course; social work knowledge, skills, values, and professional identity integrated in context of advanced practice and direct multisystemic interventions. Corequisites: SSW:7295 (042:295) or SSW:7296 (042:296).
 
SSW:7298 (042:298) Advanced Practicum Seminar in Integrated Practice II1 s.h.
Continuation of SSW:7297 (042:297). Prerequisites: SSW:7297 (042:297). Corequisites: SSW:7295 (042:295) or SSW:7296 (042:296).
 
SSW:7800 (042:300) Social Work Proseminar1 s.h.
Faculty research related to families, children, and elderly theory, research designs, methodologies, findings, dissemination. Requirements: admission to Ph.D. program.
 
SSW:7801 (042:301) Knowledge Building in Social Work Practice3 s.h.
Epistemology of social work practice theories, importance for knowledge building; practice theories of personal and interpersonal change, family life cycle development, empowerment. Requirements: admission to Ph.D. program.
 
SSW:7802 (042:302) Social Policy and Poverty in the U.S.3 s.h.
Causes of poverty in the U.S., public policies for low‑income families; arguments and evidence offered for and against a particular explanation for poverty in the U.S. or approach to anti‑poverty policy; how authors construct their arguments, underlying theory, evidence the authors bring to bear, ways they explore consequences of policy proposals; role of social science theory in advancing knowledge in social policy and research interests. Recommendations: admission to a doctoral program.
 
SSW:7803 (042:303) Social Work Research Practicum1-4 s.h.
Joint research with faculty; development of research design, choice or construction of measurement tools, selection of sample, collection and analysis of data, writing of a research report. Requirements: admission to Ph.D. program.
 
SSW:7804 (042:304) Thesis Seminar2-3 s.h.
Intensive faculty supervision and peer consultation for preparing thesis proposals; topics include literature synthesis, theory, critical and analytic thinking skills, logical argument, research design, and expectations and standards for scholarly discourse.
 
SSW:7806 (042:306) Social Work Teaching Practicum2 s.h.
Development of knowledge, values; skills essential for effective, culturally competent social work educators; applied teaching experience and seminar. Corequisites: SSW:7807 (042:307). Requirements: admission to Ph.D. program.
 
SSW:7807 (042:307) Teaching Seminar1 s.h.
Supportive environment to discuss teaching and development; topics may include how to engage and motivate students, assess student learning, diversity in the classroom, use of technology to enhance learning, student challenges.
 
SSW:7815 (042:315) Developing Knowledge in Human Service Organizations3 s.h.
Evaluation of organization theories and application of theories to developing knowledge within and about human services organizations; critical examination of a range of theories and their application to problems of conducting organizational research, from Max Weber's bureaucracy to contemporary learning organization popularized by Peter Senge; organizational culture and climate, organizational stigma, interorganizational networks; highly interactive with student‑lead sessions and discussions of critical concepts and readings. Requirements: admission to social work doctoral program.
 
SSW:7830 (042:330) Ph.D. Dissertationarr.