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Religious Studies

Chair

  • Diana Fritz Cates

Faculty

Professors

  • Diana Fritz Cates, Jay A. Holstein, Raymond A. Mentzer, Frederick M. Smith (Religious Studies/Asian and Slavic Languages and Literatures), Richard B. Turner (Religious Studies/African American Studies)

Associate professors

  • Kristy Nabhan-Warren, Michelene Pesantubbee, Morten Schlütter, Ahmed Souaiaia

Assistant professors

  • Robert Cargill (Religious Studies/Classics), Melissa Anne-Marie Curley, Paul Dilley (Religious Studies/Classics)

Lecturers

  • Robert H. M. Gerstmyer, Jordan A. Smith

Professors emeriti

  • Robert D. Baird, T. Dwight Bozeman, Helen T. Goldstein, David E. Klemm, J. Kenneth Kuntz, James F. McCue, George W.E. Nickelsburg, W. Pachow, Robert F. Weir
Undergraduate major: religious studies (B.A.)
Undergraduate minor: religious studies
Graduate degrees: M.A. in religious studies; Ph.D. in religious studies
Web site: http://clas.uiowa.edu/religion/

The Department of Religious Studies encourages multidisciplinary inquiry into religious ideas, experiences, philosophies, cultural expressions, and social movements. It studies a rich array of traditions and paths, including South Asian religions, ancient Judaism and early Christianity, African diaspora and Native American traditions, Chinese Buddhism, modern European Christianity, various Islamic sects, popular religions in Japan, American Christianities, and new forms of religion that many people may not yet recognize as religions.

Religion has taken countless forms over the millennia, and it continues to wind its way through history. The Department of Religious Studies helps students to think clearly and creatively about the many forms that religion takes and the subtle ways in which it operates.

Students gain many benefits through the critical study of religion. They learn how people from around the world have responded to age-old questions about life, love, suffering, and death. In the process, they deepen their own engagement with life. They learn about religion's impact on global events, especially its influences on the construction of personal and communal identities, and its roles in shaping processes of social change, historically and in the contemporary, digital era.  

Undergraduate Programs of Study

  • Major in religious studies (Bachelor of Arts)
  • Minor in religious studies

The major in religious studies helps students gain strengths they will need in an increasingly globalized world: curiosity, open-mindedness, critical thinking and effective communication skills, global cultural competency, knowledge of diverse religions and their influences, and the ability to use intelligence and creativity in addressing humanitarian concerns.

Because religious ideas inform every aspect of life, many students who major in religious studies choose to earn a second major in another discipline, such as anthropology, biology, classics, English, history, journalism and mass communication, philosophy, political science, or psychology. Religious studies students often go on to graduate school; professional study in law, medicine, or dentistry; and careers in nursing, social work, human rights, nongovernmental organizations, counseling, or business, especially in areas that involve human resource management.

Bachelor of Arts

The Bachelor of Arts with a major in religious studies requires a minimum of 120 s.h., including 30 s.h. of work for the major. Students must maintain a g.p.a. of at least 2.00 in all courses for the major and in all UI courses for the major. They also must complete the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences General Education Program. A maximum of 15 s.h. of transfer credit may be counted toward the major; transfer credit is evaluated individually.

Course work for the major includes core courses and electives. Courses for the major may not be taken pass/nonpass. Students may count a maximum of three religious studies courses toward General Education Program requirements.

The major in religious studies requires the following course work.

CORE COURSES

Both of these (6 s.h.):

RELS:1015 (032:015) Religions in a Global Context: The Critical Role of Religion in International Affairs3 s.h.
RELS:4950 (032:196) Senior Majors Seminar3 s.h.

The course RELS:1015 (032:015) Religions in a Global Context: The Critical Role of Religion in International Affairs provides an introduction to the study of the world's religions; students should take it as early as possible.

The capstone course RELS:4950 (032:196) Senior Majors Seminar is offered each spring semester. Ideally, students take it during their senior year, but they may take it during their junior year, instead.

ELECTIVES

Students complete 24 s.h. of elective course work (at least eight courses) chosen from either or both of two categories: religious traditions and critical issues (listed below). Students choose courses as follows.

At least two foundation courses numbered 1000-1999 6 s.h.
At least three advanced courses numbered 2000-4999 9 s.h.
At least three courses at any level9 s.h.

The department advises students to choose electives that will enable them to examine a variety of traditions and issues.

Religious Traditions

Courses in this category generally focus on religious traditions or movements in historical perspective, within particular geographical areas, or across regions. They may address foundational stories of creation and cosmic order, archaeological findings, the compilation and interpretation of revered texts, religious doctrines, social norms, rituals and practices, or conflicts and schisms.

RELS:1000 (032:029) First-Year Seminar1 s.h.
RELS:1001 (032:001) The Judeo-Christian Tradition3 s.h.
RELS:1070 (032:011) Introduction to the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament3 s.h.
RELS:1080 (032:012) Introduction to the New Testament3 s.h.
RELS:1113 (032:013) Gateway to the Bible3 s.h.
RELS:1130 (032:030) Introduction to Islamic Civilization3 s.h.
RELS:1225 (032:025) Medieval Religion and Culture3 s.h.
RELS:1250 (032:026) Modern Religion and Culture3 s.h.
RELS:1410 (032:014) Introduction to Indian Religions3 s.h.
RELS:1506 (032:006) Introduction to Buddhism3 s.h.
RELS:1510 (032:010) Gods, Buddhas, and Ghostly Officials: The Past and Present of Chinese Religions3 s.h.
RELS:1610 (032:017) Japanese Religions3 s.h.
RELS:2050 (032:058) Liturgy and Devotion in Christian Tradition3 s.h.
RELS:2090 (032:054) Issues in American Catholicism3 s.h.
RELS:2182 (032:082) Ancient Mediterranean Religions3 s.h.
RELS:2225 (032:092) Messianic and Apocalyptic Prophecy in the Bible3 s.h.
RELS:2320 (032:094) Jesus and the Gospels3 s.h.
RELS:2361 (032:061) Middle East and Mediterranean: Alexander to Suleiman3 s.h.
RELS:2681 (032:081) Hindu Religion and Art3 s.h.
RELS:2700 (032:060) Sacred World of Native Americans3 s.h.
RELS:3003 (032:122) Classical and Hellenistic Periods I3 s.h.
RELS:3103 (032:103) Biblical Archaeology1-3 s.h.
RELS:3105 (032:105) The World of the Old Testament3 s.h.
RELS:3190 (032:192) Traditions of Religious Reform3 s.h.
RELS:3243 (032:143) Early Christianity: From Jesus to the Rise of Islam3 s.h.
RELS:3245 (032:145) Mythology of Otherworldly Journeys3 s.h.
RELS:3247 (032:142) Banned from the Bible: Introduction to Pseudepigrapha and Apocrypha3 s.h.
RELS:3385 (032:085) Early Modern Catholicism3 s.h.
RELS:3560 (032:170) Topics in Asian Religions3 s.h.
RELS:3655 (032:188) Zen Buddhism3 s.h.
RELS:3660 (032:116) Japanese Religion and Thought3 s.h.
RELS:3666 (032:166) The History of a Religious and Spiritual Practice: Yoga in Asia and Beyond3 s.h.
RELS:3704 (032:104) Egyptian Art3 s.h.
RELS:3716 (032:164) Greek Religion and Society3 s.h.
RELS:4001 (032:100) Biblical Hebrew I4 s.h.
RELS:4002 (032:101) Biblical Hebrew II4 s.h.
RELS:4155 (032:154) Religious Conflict: Early-Modern Period3 s.h.
RELS:4181 (032:181) Special Topics in Western Religion3 s.h.
RELS:4352 (032:152) The Dead Sea Scrolls3 s.h.
RELS:4404 (032:186) The Literature of Daoism3 s.h.
RELS:4870 (032:179) Islamic Cultural Presence in Spain3 s.h.
RELS:4960 (032:195) Individual Study: Undergraduatesarr.
RELS:4970 (032:197) Honors Tutorial2-3 s.h.
RELS:4975 (032:198) Honors Essay2-4 s.h.
Critical Issues

Critical issues courses generally focus on ideas, arguments, or problems, often with reference to influential texts or oral traditions. They may explore religious perspectives on the nature of reality or the meaning of human existence, and they may focus on issues of gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, class, globalization, human rights, or law and politics.

RELS:1000 (032:029) First-Year Seminar1 s.h.
RELS:1350 (032:034) Introduction to African American Religions3 s.h.
RELS:1404 (032:004) Living Religions of the East3 s.h.
RELS:1702 (032:002) Religion in America Today3 s.h.
RELS:1810 (032:016) Religion and Liberation3 s.h.
RELS:1903 (032:003) Quest for Human Destiny3 s.h.
RELS:2090 (032:054) Issues in American Catholicism3 s.h.
RELS:2121 (032:121) The Bible and the Sacrifice of Animals3 s.h.
RELS:2289 (032:089) Jerusalem from the Bronze to the Digital Age3 s.h.
RELS:2351 (032:051) Religious Thinkers of the West3 s.h.
RELS:2356 (032:056) Christianity and the Enduring Human Experience3 s.h.
RELS:2720 (032:020) Religious and Ethnic Conflict in the Middle East3 s.h.
RELS:2730 (032:063) African American Islam3 s.h.
RELS:2771 (032:071) Sexual Ethics3 s.h.
RELS:2775 (032:150) The Bible and the Holocaust3 s.h.
RELS:2778 (032:078) American Indian Women: Myth, Ritual, and Sacred Power3 s.h.
RELS:2834 (032:146) Philosophy of Religion3 s.h.
RELS:2852 (032:052) Women in Islam and the Middle East3 s.h.
RELS:2912 (032:112) The Bible in Film: Hollywood and Moses3 s.h.
RELS:2947 (032:147) Quest II: Sex, Love, and Death3 s.h.
RELS:2962 (032:062) Islam in the Public Sphere: Arts, Literature, Culture, and Politics3 s.h.
RELS:2969 (032:169) Quest III: Heroes, Lovers, and Knaves3 s.h.
RELS:2980 (032:080) Religion and Contemporary Popular Culture3 s.h.
RELS:3020 (032:157) Religion and Politics3 s.h.
RELS:3237 (032:137) Modern Religious Thought: 19th Century3 s.h.
RELS:3320 (032:107) In Search of the Good Life3 s.h.
RELS:3340 (032:109) Recovering Eden: The Afterlife in Early Judaism and Christianity3 s.h.
RELS:3431 (032:131) Gender and Sexuality in East Asia3 s.h.
RELS:3448 (032:148) The Allure of Krishna: Sacred Sexuality in Indian Culture3 s.h.
RELS:3572 (032:172) Comparative Ritual3 s.h.
RELS:3575 (032:178) East Meets West: The Western Reception of Eastern Religion3 s.h.
RELS:3580 (032:180) Religion and Healing3 s.h.
RELS:3582 (032:182) Enlightenment: Cross-Cultural Experiments in Religious Realization3 s.h.
RELS:3645 (032:175) Buddhist Philosophy3 s.h.
RELS:3700 (032:127) Nonprofit Organizational Effectiveness I3 s.h.
RELS:3701 (032:128) Nonprofit Organizational Effectiveness II3 s.h.
RELS:3711 (032:111) Religion and Women3 s.h.
RELS:3714 (032:165) Anthropology of Religion3 s.h.
RELS:3745 (032:126) Twentieth-Century African American Religion: Civil Rights to Hip-Hop3 s.h.
RELS:3808 (032:108) Malcolm X, King, and Human Rights3 s.h.
RELS:3855 (032:155) Human Rights and Islam3 s.h.
RELS:3953 (032:153) Religion and the Arts3 s.h.
RELS:3976 (032:076) American Indian Environmentalism3 s.h.
RELS:4133 (032:133) Special Topics: Islamic and Middle Eastern Societies3 s.h.
RELS:4660 (032:156) Buddhist Poetry3 s.h.
RELS:4730 (032:130) Religion and Environmental Ethics3 s.h.
RELS:4741 (032:141) Varieties of American Religion3 s.h.
RELS:4748 (032:140) Religious Rhetoric: God and U.S. Politics3 s.h.
RELS:4859 (032:159) Comparative Islamic Law3 s.h.
RELS:4920 (032:158) Native American Women and Religious Change3 s.h.
RELS:4939 (032:139) Religion and Violence in America3 s.h.
RELS:4960 (032:195) Individual Study: Undergraduatesarr.
RELS:4970 (032:197) Honors Tutorial2-3 s.h.
RELS:4975 (032:198) Honors Essay2-4 s.h.

Four-Year Graduation Plan

The following checkpoints list the minimum requirements students must complete by certain semesters in order to stay on the University's Four-Year Graduation Plan.

Before the fifth semester begins: one or two courses in the major

Before the seventh semester begins: three to six courses in the major and at least 90 s.h. earned toward the degree

Before the eighth semester begins: five to seven courses in the major

During the eighth semester: enrollment in all remaining course work in the major, all remaining General Education courses, and a sufficient number of semester hours to graduate

Honors in the Major

Students majoring in religious studies have the opportunity to graduate with honors in the major. Departmental honors students must complete all requirements for the major plus an additional 3 s.h. of advanced course work, earning at least 33 s.h. for the major. They may apply 3 s.h. of RELS:4960 (032:195) Individual Study: Undergraduates or RELS:4970 (032:197) Honors Tutorial toward the 33 s.h. of credit required for the honors major. Honors students must take RELS:4975 (032:198) Honors Essay under the supervision of a faculty advisor; copies of the completed and approved essay are submitted to the Department of Religious Studies and to the University of Iowa Honors Program.

Departmental honors students must be members of the University of Iowa Honors Program, which requires students to maintain a cumulative University of Iowa g.p.a. of at least 3.33 and to fulfill other requirements; visit Honors at Iowa to learn about the University's honors program.

Minor

The minor in religious studies requires a minimum of 15 s.h. in religious studies courses, including 12 s.h. completed at The University of Iowa. Students must maintain a cumulative g.p.a. of at least 2.00 in all courses for the minor and in all UI courses for the minor. Course work for the minor may not be taken pass/nonpass. With the recommendation of the department's undergraduate committee and approval of the faculty, students may count a maximum of 3 s.h. of transfer credit toward the minor.

The minor in religious studies requires the following course work.

At least two foundation courses numbered 1000-1999 6 s.h.
At least two advanced courses numbered 2000-49996 s.h.
One course at any level3 s.h.

Students are encouraged to include RELS:1015 (032:015) Religions in a Global Context: The Critical Role of Religion in International Affairs and RELS:4950 (032:196) Senior Majors Seminar in the minor.

Graduate Programs of Study

  • Master of Arts in religious studies (with or without thesis)
  • Doctor of Philosophy in religious studies

Graduate study in the department addresses the concept of religion and several religious traditions as they have originated, developed, and interacted over time. Students learn to identify and use multiple methods for the study of religion, including historical, philosophical, ethical, literary, linguistic, psychological, ethnographic, and digital approaches.

Graduate study is flexible. Students create individualized programs of study in consultation with their advisors and core committee members, in light of faculty expertise in the department and at the University. Programs often are developed in relation to one of the following four areas of concentration.

Religions in the Middle East, Ancient Near East, and Mediterranean: religion, law, and politics in the Islamic world; the history of interpretation of the texts and traditions of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam; Greco-Roman and Egyptian religion and culture; digital humanities

Religions of Asia: India, China, and Japan; Hinduism and Buddhism

Religions of Europe and the Americas: the Reformation; the Reformed tradition; Christianity and Islam in the United States; Native American, African American, and Latino American religions

Religion, ethics, and society: religion and morality; human rights; religion, gender, and ethnicity; uses of digital technology in the study and practice of religions

Programs of study may be developed in other areas that are supported by faculty resources.

The study of religion and public life, or religion's impact on world events, unites the areas of concentration. Departmental scholars specialize in the critical analysis of religion's influences on identity formation and the dynamics of social change, in history and in the contemporary, digital era.  

A graduate degree in religious studies may lead to an academic career that includes teaching at the college or university level and the creation of new knowledge through scholarship. It also may lead to other careers, both inside and outside of academia. Knowledge gained through advanced study of religion can inform life and work in all domains and on all levels of social organization, from global to local.

For more information about graduate study and the faculty, see Graduate Program and People on the department's web site.

Master of Arts

The Master of Arts program in religious studies requires a minimum of 30 s.h. of graduate credit and is offered with or without thesis. The program is designed for students who wish to advance their understanding of a particular area of religious studies or explore a variety of traditions and topics. It is intended also to prepare students to educate the public about religion and its influences, within a variety of life and career contexts.

Students must complete 24 s.h. of the credit required for the degree at The University of Iowa and must maintain a cumulative g.p.a. of at least 3.20. Requirements for languages and other research tools vary according to the student's study focus. M.A. students are supervised by a three-person committee consisting of an advisor and two additional faculty members.

All M.A. students complete the following five courses.

RELS:5100 (032:201) Teaching and Public Engagement3 s.h.
RELS:5200 (032:202) Varieties of Religion in the Contemporary World3 s.h.
RELS:5300 (032:203) Genealogies of Religion3 s.h.
RELS:5400 (032:205) Methods and Theories in the Study of Religion3 s.h.
One graduate seminar
 
Students select remaining course work depending on their interest area and in consultation with their core committee.

In the M.A. thesis, students demonstrate and refine their research and writing skills. They may count a maximum of 6 s.h. of thesis credit toward the degree. Students who do not write a thesis must pass an M.A. examination that tests their competence in completed course work.

Doctor of Philosophy

The Doctor of Philosophy program in religious studies requires a minimum of 72 s.h. of graduate credit. Students may transfer up to 24 s.h. of credit from another accredited graduate school.

Course requirements for the Ph.D. vary according to concentration area. However, all students must complete the following eight required courses.

RELS:5100 (032:201) Teaching and Public Engagement3 s.h.
RELS:5200 (032:202) Varieties of Religion in the Contemporary World3 s.h.
RELS:5300 (032:203) Genealogies of Religion3 s.h.
RELS:5400 (032:205) Methods and Theories in the Study of Religion3 s.h.
Four graduate seminars, including at least two in religious studies

During their fourth semester in residence, students must submit a departmental program of study, which must be approved by the religious studies faculty. To gain approval, students must complete three of the required Ph.D. courses listed above and two of the graduate seminars; show satisfactory progress toward the language and course requirements of their individual programs; demonstrate the ability to write scholarly papers at a level satisfactory for the Ph.D., as assessed by the advisor and core committee members (at least two papers must be submitted to the committee); and have a cumulative University of Iowa g.p.a. of at least 3.40 (language courses that do not count toward the Ph.D. are excluded).

Students must pass a comprehensive examination based on a bibliography that covers their concentration area. They also must write a dissertation based on original research and defend it in an oral examination. They may count a maximum of 12 s.h. of dissertation credit toward the degree.

Students working toward a Ph.D. may receive an M.A. upon completing at least 30 s.h. of course work and successfully passing the comprehensive examination.

For more detailed information on graduate programs in religious studies, contact the Department of Religious Studies or visit Graduate Program on the department's web site.

Admission

Applicants must meet the admission requirements of the Graduate College; see the Manual of Rules and Regulations of the Graduate College or the Graduate College section of the Catalog.

Applicants to the M.A. program ordinarily must have a verbal reasoning score of at least 153 and a quantitative reasoning score of at least 147 on the revised Graduate Record Examination (GRE) General Test (verbal reasoning score of at least 500 and quantitative reasoning score of at least 580 on the old GRE General Test) and a g.p.a. of at least 3.00.

Applicants to the Ph.D. program ordinarily must have a verbal reasoning score of at least 158 and a quantitative reasoning score of at least 147 on the revised GRE General Test (verbal reasoning score of at least 580 and quantitative reasoning score of at least 580 on the old GRE General Test) and a g.p.a. of at least 3.40.

Application materials must include an application form; a transcript of all undergraduate and graduate work (one copy must be sent to the University's Office of Admissions and a second copy must be sent to the Department of Religious Studies); an application or waiver of consideration form for graduate assistantships; three confidential letters of recommendation; and a writing sample that demonstrates the applicant's ability to engage in critical analysis. Applicants also must submit a brief personal essay that explains their objectives for graduate study and states which area of graduate study in religion will suit their objectives best. Students may indicate one of the four areas of concentration listed under "Graduate Programs of Study" above or an area that crosses the concentrations and is well supported by faculty expertise. For details, see Graduate Admission and Financial Aid on the department's web site.

All application materials must be received by January 15 to receive full consideration for fall admission.

Financial Support

All Ph.D. students in religious studies receive funding. Ordinarily, no departmental funding is available for M.A. students.

The department offers financial support for graduate students in the form of teaching assistantships. The department may nominate eligible applicants for the Presidential Graduate Fellowship or for the Dean's Graduate Fellowship, which promotes recruitment of students from underrepresented groups.

The Gilmore Scholarship, for doctoral students interested in the relationship among religion, the visual arts, and humanistic values, pays up to full tuition for one year. It is awarded every few years.

Language Study at the University

The University offers a variety of modern European languages (see French and Italian, German, and Spanish and Portuguese in the Catalog) as well as Greek and Latin (see Classics in the Catalog); Arabic and Swahili (see French and Italian in the Catalog); and Chinese, Czech, Hindi, Japanese, Korean, Russian, and Sanskrit (see Asian and Slavic Languages and Literatures in the Catalog).

Courses

Lower-Level Undergraduate

RELS:1000 (032:029) First-Year Seminar1 s.h.
Small discussion class taught by a faculty member; topics chosen by instructor; may include outside activities (e.g., films, lectures, performances, readings, visits to research facilities). Requirements: first‑ or second‑semester standing.
 
RELS:1001 (032:001) The Judeo-Christian Tradition3 s.h.
Introduction to Judaism and Christianity; focus on scriptural foundation and historical development of these related traditions; texts and other forms of religious expression, especially in art, music, literature, and philosophy; readings from the Hebrew Bible and New Testament; other materials from selected Jewish and Christian thinkers. GE: Historical Perspectives.
 
RELS:1015 (032:015) Religions in a Global Context: The Critical Role of Religion in International Affairs3 s.h.
Religion as a factor in many international events—World Trade Center bombings in New York City, wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, Ugandan government's criminalization of homosexuality, self‑immolation of Buddhist monks in protest of China's role in Tibet; gateway to critical study of religion.
 
RELS:1021 (032:021) Judaism: The Sacred and the Secular3 s.h.
Ways in which the sacred face of Judaism (Hebrew Bible and rabbinic additions) have transformed and been transformed by historical frameworks in which Jews and Judaism have existed; special attention given to the Holocaust, modern nation‑state of Israel, and experiences of Jews in modern secular nation‑states. GE: Values, Society, and Diversity.
 
RELS:1070 (032:011) Introduction to the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament3 s.h.
History, religion, and thought of ancient Jews as recorded in their scripture. GE: Values, Society, and Diversity.
 
RELS:1080 (032:012) Introduction to the New Testament3 s.h.
History, religion, and thought of early Christians as recorded in the New Testament. GE: Values, Society, and Diversity.
 
RELS:1113 (032:013) Gateway to the Bible3 s.h.
Disagreement of Jews, Catholics, Protestants, and Eastern Orthodox Christians about the Bible, one of the most influential works in Western culture, on how it should be interpreted, what books should be included, and what versions of those books should be authoritative; introduction to issues involved in creating and interpreting the Bible; how academic study of religion seeks to provide answers.
 
RELS:1130 (032:030) Introduction to Islamic Civilization3 s.h.
Major areas of Islamic religious tradition: Qur'an, traditions of the Prophet, development and character of Islamic law, theology. GE: International and Global Issues; Values, Society, and Diversity. Same as HIST:1130 (016:031).
 
RELS:1225 (032:025) Medieval Religion and Culture3 s.h.
Religion in Europe from classical antiquity to dawn of the Reformation; the religious element in traditions such as art, architecture, literature. GE: Historical Perspectives. Same as HIST:1225 (016:035).
 
RELS:1250 (032:026) Modern Religion and Culture3 s.h.
European and American religious life from Renaissance to 21st century; focus on specific themes, such as secularism, regionalism, pluralism. GE: Historical Perspectives. Same as HIST:1250 (016:036).
 
RELS:1350 (032:034) Introduction to African American Religions3 s.h.
GE: Values, Society, and Diversity. Same as AFAM:1250 (129:050).
 
RELS:1404 (032:004) Living Religions of the East3 s.h.
Religious beliefs, practices in India, China, Japan. GE: Values, Society, and Diversity. Same as ASIA:1040 (039:064).
 
RELS:1410 (032:014) Introduction to Indian Religions3 s.h.
Religions with origins in the South Asian geographic region (e.g., Vedas in mid‑second millennium BCE, Jainism and Buddhism from sixth to fourth centuries BCE, Sikhism in 15th century, Indian Christianity, Islam); focus on Hinduism and Buddhism; rise of varied literary forms, ritual, rise of devotional religion, Tantra, how religious practices affect indigenous medical traditions, how these traditions developed in different South Asian regions; broad changes in South Asian religion in 20th and early 21st centuries, current politicization of religion.
 
RELS:1502 (032:008) Asian Humanities: India3 s.h.
Introduction to four thousand years of South Asian civilization, through popular stories. GE: Values, Society, and Diversity. Same as SOAS:1502 (039:018).
 
RELS:1506 (032:006) Introduction to Buddhism3 s.h.
Basic tenets, religious paradigms, historical phases important in the development of Buddhism; from the Buddha's life to evolution of Mahāyāna Buddhism; readings from India, Tibet, China, Japan, Korea, Southeast Asia. GE: Values, Society, and Diversity. Same as ASIA:1060 (039:006).
 
RELS:1510 (032:010) Gods, Buddhas, and Ghostly Officials: The Past and Present of Chinese Religions3 s.h.
History of religious beliefs and practices in China; role in modern‑day Chinese society; specific case studies that illuminate current situation of religion in China and impact on Chinese society; focus on the still widespread worship of gods and ancestors, the Confucian, Buddhist and Daoist traditions, recent upsurge of Christianity in China, and emergence of new religions (e.g., the Falun gong). Same as ASIA:1110 (039:007).
 
RELS:1610 (032:017) Japanese Religions3 s.h.
Religions of Japan from ancient times to the present day; elite and popular Japanese interpretations of Chinese Buddhist and Daoist traditions; the parallel development of an indigenous kami tradition; contemporary new religious movements; focus on the codification of a variety of religious (and sometimes quasi‑religious) paths, including the way of tea, the way of the brush, and the way of the samurai. Same as JPNS:1115 (39J:017).
 
RELS:1702 (032:002) Religion in America Today3 s.h.
How American men, women, and children practice their beliefs in today's society. GE: Values, Society, and Diversity.
 
RELS:1810 (032:016) Religion and Liberation3 s.h.
Reflections on the life stories of Black Elk, Maya Angelou, and the Dalai Lama. GE: Values, Society, and Diversity.
 
RELS:1903 (032:003) Quest for Human Destiny3 s.h.
Quests for destiny in terms of perceived options/goals and ability to recognize, pursue, achieve them. GE: Values, Society, and Diversity.
 
RELS:2050 (032:058) Liturgy and Devotion in Christian Tradition3 s.h.
Liturgical traditions and devotional practices in western Christianity; Medieval Christian tradition, changes in liturgy and devotion that occurred with reformations of the 16th and 17th centuries; overview of modern developments. Same as HIST:2050 (16E:058).
 
RELS:2068 (032:068) Jewish Identities: National, Ethnic, and Religious3 s.h.
Exploration of a wide variety of ways in which Jewish people around the world understand what it means to be Jewish.
 
RELS:2090 (032:054) Issues in American Catholicism3 s.h.
Major issues that have faced Catholics in America; special attention to issues of gender, racial, and ethnic identities.
 
RELS:2121 (032:121) The Bible and the Sacrifice of Animals3 s.h.
Why the biblical God permits humans to eat other animals' flesh; fundamental dietary differences between humans and the beasts.
 
RELS:2182 (032:082) Ancient Mediterranean Religions3 s.h.
Introduction to major religious traditions of ancient Mediterranean world; Mesopotamia, the Levant (Hebrew Bible), Egypt, Greece, and Rome; central aspects of mythology, ritual, and archaeology, individually and in comparative perspective; ancient Judaism and Christianity considered in their various cultural contexts; basic concepts for understanding cultural exchange; fundamental theories in the study of religion. GE: Values, Society, and Diversity. Same as CLSA:2482 (20E:082).
 
RELS:2225 (032:092) Messianic and Apocalyptic Prophecy in the Bible3 s.h.
Literary, historical, and theological analysis of biblical prophecies and their impact. Same as CLSA:2425 (20E:092).
 
RELS:2289 (032:089) Jerusalem from the Bronze to the Digital Age3 s.h.
Religious, political, and cultural history of Jerusalem over three millennia as a symbolic focus of three faiths—Judaism, Christianity, and Islam; integration of several digital learning technologies, including digital reconstructions and Google Earth tours of Jerusalem. Same as CLSA:2489 (20E:089).
 
RELS:2320 (032:094) Jesus and the Gospels3 s.h.
How Jesus was depicted in the writings of the early church; reasons for the different portrayals. Same as CLSA:2420 (20E:094).
 
RELS:2351 (032:051) Religious Thinkers of the West3 s.h.
Augustine, Bonaventure, Fichte, Kierkegaard, Heidegger. GE: Values, Society, and Diversity.
 
RELS:2356 (032:056) Christianity and the Enduring Human Experience3 s.h.
Topics in Christian history and thought; emphasis on the relationship between communities of belief and Christian traditions.
 
RELS:2361 (032:061) Middle East and Mediterranean: Alexander to Suleiman3 s.h.
GE: Historical Perspectives. Same as HIST:2461 (016:045), CLSA:2461 (20E:071).
 
RELS:2674 (032:074) Food and Identity in Global Religions3 s.h.
Introduction to study of food and identity in a global context.
 
RELS:2681 (032:081) Hindu Religion and Art3 s.h.
Hinduism's mystery dispelled through examination of its basic concepts, using art works, sacred texts, myths, devotional poetry; what divine power is, what sculpted and painted images of gods and goddesses mean, how Hindu devotees relate to these awesome personages today.
 
RELS:2700 (032:060) Sacred World of Native Americans3 s.h.
GE: Values, Society, and Diversity. Same as AINS:2700 (149:060).
 
RELS:2720 (032:020) Religious and Ethnic Conflict in the Middle East3 s.h.
Relationship between religion and politics in the Middle East; examination of areas of conflict, including Lebanon, Iraq, and Israel/Palestine.
 
RELS:2730 (032:063) African American Islam3 s.h.
Same as AFAM:2730 (129:063).
 
RELS:2771 (032:071) Sexual Ethics3 s.h.
Introduction to religion and ethics; diverse secular, Jewish, and Christian perspectives on human sexuality and sexual activity; religious views underlying divergent attitudes toward same‑gender sexuality and abortion. Same as GWSS:2771 (131:071).
 
RELS:2775 (032:150) The Bible and the Holocaust3 s.h.
Religious and philosophic implications of the Holocaust viewed through survivors' writings.
 
RELS:2778 (032:078) American Indian Women: Myth, Ritual, and Sacred Power3 s.h.
Participation of women and girls in native religious traditions; obstacles to knowing and understanding native women's religious roles and experiences. Same as AINS:2078 (149:082).
 
RELS:2791 (032:091) Religion and Social Life3 s.h.
Religion as a dimension of experience that can find diverse forms of expression, especially in social life and production of culture, not simply a social institution that is defined by a set of beliefs and practices.
 
RELS:2834 (032:146) Philosophy of Religion3 s.h.
Medieval to contemporary treatments of central issues: the nature of faith; the existence and nature of God; religion and ethics; the interpretation of religious texts. Requirements: sophomore or higher standing. Same as PHIL:2534 (026:134).
 
RELS:2852 (032:052) Women in Islam and the Middle East3 s.h.
Women in the Islamic community and in non‑Muslim Middle Eastern cultures; early rise of Islam to modern times; references to women in the Qur'an and Sunnah, stories from Islamic history; women and gender issues. GE: International and Global Issues; Values, Society, and Diversity. Same as GWSS:2052 (131:060).
 
RELS:2877 (032:077) Sport and Religion in America3 s.h.
Sport as a religion; religiosity in sports; examination of religion and sport as connected in important ways in American society. Same as SPST:2077 (028:073).
 
RELS:2883 (032:083) Science and Christianity: Conflicts and Conversations3 s.h.
Science, technology, and religion as some of the most powerful forces in the world and their dramatic interactions; various conflicts and conversations between science and Christianity in modern Western culture beginning with Galileo; evolution, intelligent design, Big Bang, "God Particle," Human Genome Project, and spiritual implications of neuroscience. Recommendations: nontechnical knowledge of physics, biology, and psychology.
 
RELS:2912 (032:112) The Bible in Film: Hollywood and Moses3 s.h.
How Hollywood has interpreted the Biblical stories of Adam and Eve, Moses, and David the King.
 
RELS:2930 (032:093) Digital Media and Religion3 s.h.
Influences of digital media on religion and spirituality today. Requirements: for COMM:2079 (036:079) — communication studies major, g.p.a of at least 2.30, and completion of four Foundation of Communication courses chosen from COMM:1301 (036:001), COMM:1305 (036:005), COMM:1112 (036:012) or COMM:1170 (036:070), COMM:1117 (036:017) or COMM:1130 (036:030), and COMM:1168 (036:068) or COMM:1174 (036:074). Same as COMM:2079 (036:079).
 
RELS:2947 (032:147) Quest II: Sex, Love, and Death3 s.h.
Readings from the Hebrew Bible, Sophocles' Antigone, Melville's Billy Budd, Hemingway's The Sun Also Rises, Salinger's A Perfect Day for Banana Fish, the film From Here to Eternity.
 
RELS:2962 (032:062) Islam in the Public Sphere: Arts, Literature, Culture, and Politics3 s.h.
Religion as exerting undeniable influence in public sphere in communities around the world; examination of ways in which religion manifests itself in public sphere; religion in the arts, politics, science, literature, sports, communication, business, education, and many other domains of public sphere.
 
RELS:2969 (032:169) Quest III: Heroes, Lovers, and Knaves3 s.h.
Tension between Paganism and the Bible regarding heroism and eroticism; the Song of Songs, stories of Rachel, Samson, Saul, Bathsheba; Plato's Symposium, Hemingway's The Snows of Kilimanjaro, Salinger's For Esmé with Love and Squalor; The Highlander, The Matrix, Bridget Jones' Diary; unmasking knaves to truly appreciate heroes and lovers.
 
RELS:2980 (032:080) Religion and Contemporary Popular Culture3 s.h.
Representation and appropriation of world religions in contemporary popular culture (film, television, music, new media); new religious movements arising within popular culture; religion in the digital age; commodification and globalization; focusing on cultural production in North America and Asia.
 

Upper-Level Undergraduate and Graduate

RELS:3003 (032:122) Classical and Hellenistic Periods I3 s.h.
Readings in Greek literature of the Classical and Hellenistic periods. Prerequisites: CLSG:2002 (20G:012). Same as CLSG:3003 (20G:122).
 
RELS:3020 (032:157) Religion and Politics3 s.h.
Major trends in Islamic religious thought since the colonial period, focusing on encounters between Islamic and the modern world; Ibn Khaldun; renewal movements; varieties of religious reform and accommodation; nationalism, socialism, and so forth. Recommendations: prior course work in content topic.
 
RELS:3103 (032:103) Biblical Archaeology1,3 s.h.
Contributions of Syro‑Palestinian archaeological research to understanding historical, cultural backgrounds of biblical period.
 
RELS:3105 (032:105) The World of the Old Testament3 s.h.
Historical, intellectual background; focus on patterns of thought, religion in Near East, relation to Israelite religion.
 
RELS:3129 (032:129) Native American Prophets and Prophecy3 s.h.
Religious movements, effects of prophecies on followers of religious movements, and resulting tensions with Americans; powerful visions described as messages from a spirit being experienced by several 19th‑century Native Americans after waking from coma‑like states—wonderful prophecies of the restoration of Native American world to what it once was before American colonization, prophecies leading to religious movements that called for return to traditional practices, rejection of many elements of white American culture, and warnings of an impending destruction of the world.
 
RELS:3190 (032:192) Traditions of Religious Reform3 s.h.
Same as HIST:3190 (016:192).
 
RELS:3237 (032:137) Modern Religious Thought: 19th Century3 s.h.
 
RELS:3243 (032:143) Early Christianity: From Jesus to the Rise of Islam3 s.h.
Introduction to the history of early Christianity, from the time of Jesus to the rise of Islam; focus on major movements, intellectuals, and institutions in this period; growth of Christianity in different geographical areas, including the Middle East, Greece, Western Europe, and Africa; Christian relations with Jews, pagans, and Muslims; conversion; orthodoxy, heresy, and the making of the biblical canon; martyrdom; women and gender roles; asceticism, monasticism, and sexuality; church and state; theological controversy and schisms; the cult of saints; the Holy Land and pilgrimage. Same as CLSA:3443 (20E:146).
 
RELS:3245 (032:145) Mythology of Otherworldly Journeys3 s.h.
Examination of mythology of otherworldly journeys from earliest religions to Hellenistic period; historical context; comparison for common themes in their evolution over time; directed readings of mythological texts dealing with otherworldly journeys; ways in which past cultures confronted larger mysteries of life and death. Same as CLSA:3445 (20E:145).
 
RELS:3247 (032:142) Banned from the Bible: Introduction to Pseudepigrapha and Apocrypha3 s.h.
Introduction to biblical Pseudepigrapha and Apocrapha; writings dating from third century BCE to third century CE fictionally attributed to characters in the Hebrew Bible and New Testament, or written as though they originated in the First or Second Temple periods, not included in Jewish or major Christian canons of scripture; English translations of documents from this period; key themes and interpretative techniques common throughout biblical texts that provide tremendous insight into the worlds that produced the Hebrew Bible and New Testament. Same as CLSA:3247 (20E:147).
 
RELS:3320 (032:107) In Search of the Good Life3 s.h.
Works from Greco‑Roman, Jewish, and Christian cultures to analyze various beliefs on how humans can live the good life and examine how these solutions are intimately connected to the specific conceptions of the divine world. Same as CLSA:3420 (20E:107).
 
RELS:3340 (032:109) Recovering Eden: The Afterlife in Early Judaism and Christianity3 s.h.
Development of afterlife ideology in Jewish and Christian traditions; ideas that influenced this development, particularly as related to problem of suffering. Same as CLSA:3440 (20E:104).
 
RELS:3385 (032:085) Early Modern Catholicism3 s.h.
Same as HIST:3385 (16E:085).
 
RELS:3431 (032:131) Gender and Sexuality in East Asia3 s.h.
Conceptions of sex, gender, and sexuality in the religions of China, Korea, and Japan; asceticism and celibacy; sexual alchemy; the difference between male and female bodies and souls; intersexed persons; female saints and immortals; transgressive sexuality; gender and sexuality in colonial Asia; East Asian religions and postcolonial feminism. Same as GWSS:3131 (131:131).
 
RELS:3448 (032:148) The Allure of Krishna: Sacred Sexuality in Indian Culture3 s.h.
For thousands of years, Krishna, the dark‑skinned flute‑player, has been central to the religious experience of many Hindus; his diverse roles as mischievous divine child, sensual teenage cowherd, and adult statesman, warrior, and philosopher celebrated in poetry and prose, painting and sculpture, music, dance, drama, film, and television; exploration of multiple facets of Krishna's character through literary and visual sources, performances; focus on Indian interpretations of erotic content prominent in his story and to the figure of Radha, Krishna's mistress and beloved. Same as SOAS:3448 (039:148).
 
RELS:3560 (032:170) Topics in Asian Religions3 s.h.
Same as ASIA:3560 (039:168).
 
RELS:3572 (032:172) Comparative Ritual3 s.h.
Practice and theory; rituals from religions, including Hinduism, Buddhism, Christianity, Indian religions; theories of interpretation. Same as ASIA:3890 (039:172).
 
RELS:3575 (032:178) East Meets West: The Western Reception of Eastern Religion3 s.h.
Introduction of religious ideas and forms from India, China, and Japan into Europe and America to late 20th century, from Greeks to New Age. Same as ASIA:3775 (039:188).
 
RELS:3580 (032:180) Religion and Healing3 s.h.
Historical evidence of religious healing in Christian, Hindu, Buddhist, Native American, and Shaman traditions. Same as ANTH:3113 (113:145), GHS:3113 (152:145).
 
RELS:3582 (032:182) Enlightenment: Cross-Cultural Experiments in Religious Realization3 s.h.
Enlightenment as one of the most important ideas that feeds contemporary religious and spiritual imagination; exploration of this concept in contemporary religious and spiritual discourse. Same as SOAS:3920 (039:183).
 
RELS:3645 (032:175) Buddhist Philosophy3 s.h.
Introduction to main ideas. Requirements: sophomore or higher standing. Same as PHIL:3845 (026:145).
 
RELS:3655 (032:188) Zen Buddhism3 s.h.
Prerequisites: RELS:1404 (032:004) or RELS:1506 (032:006) or RELS:1510 (032:010). Same as ASIA:3655 (039:170).
 
RELS:3660 (032:116) Japanese Religion and Thought3 s.h.
Same as JPNS:3660 (39J:109).
 
RELS:3666 (032:166) The History of a Religious and Spiritual Practice: Yoga in Asia and Beyond3 s.h.
Historical, textual, and anthropological readings; visual material, yoga demonstrations, discussions of yoga practices; theory underlies readings, including ritual theory and practice theory; psychology and inquiries into the nature of religious adaptation and syncretism.
 
RELS:3700 (032:127) Nonprofit Organizational Effectiveness I3 s.h.
Operational and financial aspects of nonprofit management; mission and governance of organization; strategic planning for effective management, including finance, budget, income generation, fund‑raising. Same as ENTR:3595 (06T:144), MUSM:3500 (024:147), SSW:3500 (042:157), NURS:3595 (096:168), MGMT:3500 (06J:147).
 
RELS:3701 (032:128) Nonprofit Organizational Effectiveness II3 s.h.
Qualities for leadership of nonprofit organizations, including relationships with staff and volunteers; relationship of nonprofit and outside world; marketing, public relations, advocacy strategies for nonprofits. Same as MUSM:3600 (024:148), MGMT:3600 (06J:148), NURS:3600 (096:169), SSW:3600 (042:158).
 
RELS:3704 (032:104) Egyptian Art3 s.h.
Sculpture, painting, architecture, and luxury arts from Pyramid Age to Death of Cleopatra. Same as ARTH:3320 (01H:110).
 
RELS:3711 (032:111) Religion and Women3 s.h.
Sexism and its disavowal in biblical narrative, law, wisdom texts, Gospels, epistles; contemporary impact. GE: Values, Society, and Diversity.
 
RELS:3714 (032:165) Anthropology of Religion3 s.h.
Approaches; religious roles; shamanism, witchcraft, curing; mythology; place of religion in social and cultural change. Same as ANTH:3114 (113:142).
 
RELS:3716 (032:164) Greek Religion and Society3 s.h.
From Bronze Age to the Hellenistic period, in context of Mediterranean culture; evidence such as choral hymn, inscribed prayers, magical curses inscribed on lead, architecture, sculpted offerings to the gods. GE: Values, Society, and Diversity. Same as CLSA:3416 (20E:115).
 
RELS:3745 (032:126) Twentieth-Century African American Religion: Civil Rights to Hip-Hop3 s.h.
Twentieth‑century African American religious history; major political and cultural movements, such as civil rights, black power, black feminism/womanism, hip‑hop. Same as AFAM:3245 (129:123).
 
RELS:3767 (032:067) Theological Questions3 s.h.
Treatment of basic religious questions, such as the meaning of "God," nature of religious symbols, phenomena of skepticism and atheism.
 
RELS:3808 (032:108) Malcolm X, King, and Human Rights3 s.h.
Religion and politics of Malcolm X and Martin Luther King, Jr. in the context of U.S. civil rights and international human rights in West Africa and the Muslim world; emphasis on civil rights connections to Gandhi, the Nobel Peace prize, and other international experiences that have impacted Pan Africanists, such as Stokely Carmichael, who worked on human rights. Recommendations: international studies major or undergraduate standing. Same as AFAM:3500 (129:108).
 
RELS:3834 (032:134) Arab Spring in Context: Media, Religion, and Geopolitics3 s.h.
Protest movements that started in Tunisia in 2011 and swept across North Africa and the Middle East transforming Arab and Islamic societies in radically different ways; function of social media, satellite television, communication technology; influence of religious leaders and groups on some protest outcomes; impact of wealth and geopolitics on social fabric of Islamic societies within and outside Arab countries. Requirements: for COMM:3834 (036:129) — g.p.a. of at least 2.50, completion of Foundations of Communication requirement, and 6 s.h. of intermediate‑level course work. Same as IS:3834 (187:126), WLLC:3834 (218:165), JMC:3146 (019:146), COMM:3834 (036:129).
 
RELS:3855 (032:155) Human Rights and Islam3 s.h.
Human rights in religious and secular discourse, seventh century to present; Islamic law, human rights law, religion, politics. GE: International and Global Issues.
 
RELS:3953 (032:153) Religion and the Arts3 s.h.
Analysis, interpretation of religious themes in literature, film, painting.
 
RELS:3976 (032:076) American Indian Environmentalism3 s.h.
Same as AINS:3276 (149:076).
 
RELS:4001 (032:100) Biblical Hebrew I4 s.h.
 
RELS:4002 (032:101) Biblical Hebrew II4 s.h.
 
RELS:4124 (032:124) Digital Archaeological Modeling1-3 s.h.
Introduction to foundational theory, methodology, programming skills, and conceptual understanding necessary to model remains and reconstructions of archaeological sites in various three‑dimensional digital modeling environments. Recommendations: background in archaeology. Same as CLSA:4131 (20E:131).
 
RELS:4133 (032:133) Special Topics: Islamic and Middle Eastern Societies3 s.h.
Recent events in Islamic world and Middle East; varied topics.
 
RELS:4155 (032:154) Religious Conflict: Early-Modern Period3 s.h.
Reformation of 16th century—Lutheran, Calvinist, Radical, English; readings from major representatives of each. Same as HIST:4455 (16E:123).
 
RELS:4181 (032:181) Special Topics in Western Religion3 s.h.
Examination of a specific topic of interest related to Western religious traditions. Recommendations: some background in Judaism, Christianity, or classics.
 
RELS:4352 (032:152) The Dead Sea Scrolls3 s.h.
Introduction to the Dead Sea Scrolls; reading of the scrolls in English translation; examination of Qumran site archaeology; survey of broader sociopolitical context of Second Temple Judaism (586 BCE to 135 CE) out of which the scrolls emerged. Same as CLSA:4452 (20E:152).
 
RELS:4404 (032:186) The Literature of Daoism3 s.h.
Texts of philosophical, religious Daoism; Daoism in traditional Chinese political theory, literature, the arts, alchemy and medicine, sexual custom, combat. Taught in English. Same as CHIN:4204 (039:140).
 
RELS:4660 (032:156) Buddhist Poetry3 s.h.
Poetry across the Buddhist world as a favorite form of expression for talking about things that cannot be captured in words; content and style of some major works of Buddhist poetry; theories about relationships between words and meaning that inform poems; scandalous lives of poets; opportunity to explore Buddhist poetry analytically and creatively; no prior knowledge of Asian languages required. Same as ASIA:4660 (039:156).
 
RELS:4730 (032:130) Religion and Environmental Ethics3 s.h.
How humans conceptualize the biophysical environment through religious beliefs and practices; how images of the environment influence people's activities, how they are used by grassroots environmental movements. Requirements: junior or senior standing. Same as ANTH:4130 (113:139).
 
RELS:4741 (032:141) Varieties of American Religion3 s.h.
Examination of varied 20th‑ and 21st‑century American religious individuals and groups; understand and analyze unique communities. Same as HIST:4241 (16A:122).
 
RELS:4748 (032:140) Religious Rhetoric: God and U.S. Politics3 s.h.
Use of religious language by American presidents, presidential hopefuls, and their religious supporters; begins with early presidents, then majority of focus is on last 65 years. Recommendations: previous course in religious studies.
 
RELS:4768 (032:168) Islamic Sects3 s.h.
Nexus between key texts (i.e., the Qur'an, Hadith, Tafsir, usul, kalam, and other literatures) and the rise and development of Islamic sects and groupings, including Kharajites, Shiites, Ibadis, Salafis, and Sufis.
 
RELS:4859 (032:159) Comparative Islamic Law3 s.h.
Sources of Islamic law; origins and functions of varied schools of jurisprudence; Islamic legal philosophy and Islamic legal rulings in contexts of five major schools of law; major legal topics covered by the Ottoman Legal Code. Same as LAW:8250 (091:223).
 
RELS:4870 (032:179) Islamic Cultural Presence in Spain3 s.h.
Islamic history and culture in the Iberian Peninsula from Middle Ages to present. Taught in Spanish. Requirements: one literature or culture course taught in Spanish numbered SPAN:3200 (035:130) or above. Same as SPAN:4870 (035:179).
 
RELS:4893 (032:193) Classical Arabic: Vocabulary, Syntax, and Grammar1-3 s.h.
Arabic grammar, syntax, and reading fluency. Prerequisites: ARAB:2001 (195:111). Corequisites: RELS:3855 (032:155) or RELS:4768 (032:168) or RELS:4859 (032:159).
 
RELS:4920 (032:158) Native American Women and Religious Change3 s.h.
Native women's diverse experiences and their roles in native societies, examined through contact experiences between native and nonnative peoples; changes in women's roles in context of interactions between native people, missionaries, European colonists, and Americans; approaches to re‑imaging women's early contact roles presented in cultural narratives, archaeology, history, ethnography, and missionary records. Same as AINS:4560 (149:158), GWSS:4560 (131:159).
 
RELS:4939 (032:139) Religion and Violence in America3 s.h.
Movements in North American history marked by violence (i.e., Peoples Temple, Lakota Ghost Dance, Branch Davidians, Shawnee Movement); the role of violence in expressing and shaping some religious movements.
 
RELS:4950 (032:196) Senior Majors Seminar3 s.h.
Issues central to academic study of religion.
 
RELS:4960 (032:195) Individual Study: Undergraduatesarr.
 
RELS:4970 (032:197) Honors Tutorial2-3 s.h.
 
RELS:4975 (032:198) Honors Essay2-4 s.h.
 

Graduate

RELS:5067 (032:267) Readings in Islamic Studiesarr.
Current scholarship in the field of Islamic studies; major works in areas such as modern Islamic thought, Islamic legal and philosophical traditions, religion and politics.
 
RELS:5100 (032:201) Teaching and Public Engagement2-3 s.h.
Critical importance of educating people about religion within increasingly globalized and digitized contexts; preparation to excel as classroom teachers and facilitators of cross‑religious dialogue in public sphere.
 
RELS:5200 (032:202) Varieties of Religion in the Contemporary World3 s.h.
Limited content of multiple religious traditions from different parts of contemporary world; conversing knowledgeably about global religious diversity; preparation to design and teach a world religions course.
 
RELS:5300 (032:203) Genealogies of Religion3 s.h.
Genealogies of the idea of religion, academic study of religion, and comparative study of religions; intellectual and ideological foundations of discipline; preparation to work skillfully across traditions.
 
RELS:5400 (032:205) Methods and Theories in the Study of Religion3 s.h.
Principal methods, theories in academic study of religion.
 
RELS:5900 (032:259) Advanced Readings in African American Culturearr.
Textual, social, political analyses of works by Black authors. Same as AFAM:5900 (129:212).
 
RELS:6040 (032:229) Tiberius to Trajanarr.
Authors and topics from the first and second centuries C.E. Same as CLSL:6013 (20L:229).
 
RELS:6050 (032:250) The Art of Reading Sacred Literature in Judaism and Islamarr.
Ways in which Jews and Muslims in the Middle Ages interpreted sacred writ; works by al‑Farabi, Averroes, Halevi, and Maimonides; tension between reason (the great attraction of these thinkers to Plato and Aristotle and their interpreters) and revelation (their faith commitment to revelation, i.e., sacred writ). Requirements: reading knowledge of Biblical Hebrew or Arabic.
 
RELS:6070 (032:227) Nonprofit Organizational Effectiveness I3 s.h.
Operational and financing aspects of nonprofit management; mission and governance of organization; strategic planning for effective management, including finance, budget, income generation, fund‑raising. Same as SLIS:6430 (021:263), MGMT:9150 (06J:247), LAW:8751 (091:320), HMP:6360 (174:247), SSW:6247 (042:247), URP:6278 (102:278), MUSM:6010 (024:247), SPST:6010 (028:257).
 
RELS:6075 (032:228) Nonprofit Organizational Effectiveness II3 s.h.
Qualities for leadership of nonprofit organizations, including relationships with staff and volunteers; relationship of nonprofit and outside world; marketing, public relations, advocacy strategies for nonprofits. Requirements: for LAW:8752 (091:322)LAW:8751 (091:320); for HMP:6365 (174:248)HMP:6360 (174:247) or MGMT:9150 (06J:247) or MUSM:6010 (024:247). Same as MGMT:9160 (06J:248), LAW:8752 (091:322), SLIS:6435 (021:265), SSW:6248 (042:248), HMP:6365 (174:248), URP:6279 (102:279), MUSM:6020 (024:248), SPST:6020 (028:258).
 
RELS:6150 (032:218) Seminar: Religion in America3 s.h.
Religious experience in America; topics.
 
RELS:6200 (032:226) Seminar: Religious Ethics3 s.h.
 
RELS:6475 (032:223) Seminar: Reformation Culture and Theologyarr.
Culture and theology of 16th‑century Europe. Same as HIST:6475 (016:223).
 
RELS:6520 (032:235) Seminar: South Asian Religion3 s.h.
Topics in South Asian religions. Same as ASIA:6520 (039:235).
 
RELS:6580 (032:231) Seminar: Religion and Society3 s.h.
 
RELS:6723 (032:225) Seminar on Islamic Law and Government3 s.h.
Islamic legal and political legacy from formative period until modern time; critical analysis of logic and context of development; development of jurisprudential, legal, and political literature; overview of theories and practices of governance in Islam beginning with Caliphate system and ending with modern nation‑state models. Same as LAW:9723 (091:636).
 
RELS:7100 (032:261) Readings in American Religionsarr.
 
RELS:7200 (032:264) Readings in Religious Ethicsarr.
 
RELS:7260 (032:260) French Paleography1,3 s.h.
Independent study of original French writings.
 
RELS:7400 (032:263) Readings in Theology and Religious Thoughtarr.
 
RELS:7450 (032:262) Readings in History of Christianityarr.
 
RELS:7500 (032:265) Readings in Asian Religionsarr.
 
RELS:7600 (032:266) Readings in Classical Arabic1-3 s.h.
Requirements: proficiency in Modern Standard Arabic.
 
RELS:7650 (032:255) Readings in Ancient Near Eastern Religionsarr.
Ancient Near Eastern religious texts; focus on their place in ancient Near Eastern history and religious thought.
 
RELS:7900 (032:290) Individual Study: Graduatesarr.
 
RELS:7950 (032:291) Thesisarr.