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Classics

Interim chair

  • Robert C. Ketterer

Professors

  • Helena Dettmer, John F. Finamore, Craig Gibson, Carin M. Green, Robert C. Ketterer, Arthur L. Spisak

Associate professors

  • Mary J. Depew, Glenn R. Storey

Assistant professors

  • Marquis S. Berrey, Robert R. Cargill, Paul C. Dilley

Lecturers

  • Marcia Lindgren, Rosemary Moore

Adjunct professor

  • Peter Green

Professors emeriti

  • Erling B. Holtsmark, Donald F. Jackson
Undergraduate majors: ancient civilization (B.A.); classical languages (B.A.)
Undergraduate minors: ancient civilization; classical languages; Greek; Latin
Postbaccalaureate certificate: classics
Graduate degrees: M.A. in classics; M.A. in Greek; M.A. in Latin; Ph.D. in classics
Web site: http://clas.uiowa.edu/classics/

Classics is the study of ancient languages, literatures, and cultures of the Mediterranean basin from approximately 2000 B.C.E. to 600 C.E. It embraces three civilizations—the Minoan-Mycenaean, Greek, and Roman; two languages—Greek and Latin; and a geographical area including Europe, North Africa, Egypt, and the Near East. The Department of Classics provides a basis for understanding and interpreting the contribution of the ancient world to life in the present and the future.

Undergraduates in all majors may satisfy the World Languages requirement of the General Education Program with courses in Greek, Latin, or Sanskrit; see "Language for General Education" below. The department offers a substantial selection of courses taught in English at the undergraduate and graduate levels; several are approved for General Education. The department's First-Year Seminar introduces entering undergraduates to classics.

Undergraduate Programs of Study

  • Major in ancient civilization (Bachelor of Arts)
  • Major in classical languages (Bachelor of Arts)
  • Minor in ancient civilization
  • Minor in classical languages
  • Minor in Greek
  • Minor in Latin

The department's undergraduate majors provide a solid foundation for graduate study in classics, European literature, law, history, art, philosophy, and religion. The major in classical languages offers concentrations in Greek and/or Latin. Bachelor of Arts graduates have become secondary school and university teachers, lawyers, doctors, librarians, museum curators, and bankers.

Bachelor of Arts: Ancient Civilization

The Bachelor of Arts with a major in ancient civilization requires a minimum of 120 s.h., including at least 30 s.h. of work for the major. The program concentrates on the ancient civilization of the Mediterranean world, draws on courses offered by various University departments, and allows students to create individual programs. The major offers an optional track for students with a particular interest in civilizations of the east Mediterranean from the earliest times through antiquity; see "Egypt and the Ancient Near East Track" below.

The major, including the Egypt and the ancient Near East track, is sponsored by the School of Art and Art History and the Departments of Classics, History, and Religious Studies.

Although the major is not preparation for graduate study in classics, it provides a sound basis for preparing individuals to teach at the secondary school and community college levels. It also provides a liberal arts and sciences foundation appropriate for further study in law, medicine, and other professions.

Students choose courses in consultation with their advisors. They must earn at least 15 s.h. of the credit required for the major in courses numbered 100 or above, which may include classics in English courses numbered 20E:100 (CLSA:4400) and above, the Greek language courses 20G:011 (CLSG:2001) Second-Year Greek I and 20G:012 (CLSG:2002) Second-Year Greek II, and the Latin language courses 20L:011 (CLSL:2001) World of Cicero and 20L:012 (CLSL:2002) Golden Age of Roman Poetry. Transfer credit is evaluated individually.

All students must complete the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences General Education Program.

In addition to completing required course work, students maintain a required portfolio detailing their progress toward the major, which they must complete before graduation; see "Major Portfolio" below.

Students must maintain a g.p.a. of at least 2.00 in work for the major and in all University of Iowa courses.

The major in ancient civilization requires the following course work.

MATERIAL CULTURE

At least 6 s.h. from these:

01H:026 (ARTH:2320)/20E:026 (CLSA:2226) Introduction to Ancient Art3 s.h.
01H:109 (ARTH:3161) Themes in Ancient Art3 s.h.
01H:110 (ARTH:3320)/032:104 (RELS:3704) Egyptian Art3 s.h.
01H:127 (ARTH:3330)/20E:124 (CLSA:3227) Classical Greek Art3 s.h.
01H:128 (ARTH:3340) Greek Vase Painting3 s.h.
01H:132 (ARTH:3350)/20E:128 (CLSA:3232) Art of Early Rome: Patrons and Politics3 s.h.
01H:133 (ARTH:3360)/20E:130 (CLSA:3233) Art of the Ancient Roman Empire3 s.h.
01H:134 (ARTH:3370)/20E:129 (CLSA:3234) Art and Culture in Ancient Pompeii3 s.h.
113:192 (ANTH:3276)/20E:118 (CLSA:3235) Greek Archaeology and Ethnohistory3 s.h.
113:194 (ANTH:3277)/20E:119 (CLSA:3240) Roman Archaeology3 s.h.
113:196 (ANTH:3275)/20E:196 (CLSA:3596) The Archaeology of Ancient Egypt3 s.h.
ANCIENT HISTORY

At least 6 s.h. from these:

016:045 (HIST:2461)/032:061 (RELS:2361)/20E:071 (CLSA:2461) Middle East and Mediterranean: Alexander to Suleiman3 s.h.
16E:100 (HIST:4400)/20E:100 (CLSA:4400) The Roman Empire3 s.h.
16E:101 (HIST:4401)/20E:101 (CLSA:4101) Ancient Egypt and the Ancient Near East3 s.h.
16E:102 (HIST:3436)/20E:136 (CLSA:3836) Food in Ancient Mediterranean Society3 s.h.
16E:103 (HIST:4403) Alexander the Great3 s.h.
16E:104 (HIST:4404) The World of Ancient Greece3 s.h.
16E:105 (HIST:3405)/20E:144 (CLSA:3144) Engineering and Technology in the Ancient Mediterranean3 s.h.
16E:106 (HIST:4406)/20E:106 (CLSA:4106) Warfare in Ancient Mediterranean Society3 s.h.
16E:107 (HIST:4407) The Hellenistic World and Rome3 s.h.
16E:115 (HIST:3151)/20E:151 (CLSA:3151) Roman Law3 s.h.
20E:017 (CLSA:1117) The First Caesars: Julius Caesar to Nero3 s.h.
20E:030 (CLSA:1830) Greek Civilization3 s.h.
20E:031 (CLSA:1840) Roman Civilization3 s.h.
ANCIENT PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGIOUS STUDIES

At least 6 s.h. from these:

20E:071 (CLSA:2461)/016:045 (HIST:2461)/032:061 (RELS:2361) Middle East and Mediterranean: Alexander to Suleiman3 s.h.
20E:115 (CLSA:3416)/032:164 (RELS:3716) Greek Religion and Society3 s.h.
20E:138 (CLSA:3338)/026:110 (PHIL:3110) Philosophy of Ancient Greece and Rome3 s.h.
20E:140 (CLSA:3340) Magic in the Ancient World3 s.h.
026:111 (PHIL:3111) Ancient Philosophy3 s.h.
026:152 (PHIL:5152) Plato3 s.h.
026:153 (PHIL:5153) Aristotle3 s.h.
032:001 (RELS:1001) The Judeo-Christian Tradition3 s.h.
032:011 (RELS:1070) Introduction to the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament3 s.h.
032:012 (RELS:1080) Introduction to the New Testament3 s.h.
032:082 (RELS:2182)/20E:082 (CLSA:2482) Ancient Mediterranean Religions3 s.h.
032:094 (RELS:2320) Jesus and His Interpreters3 s.h.
032:103 (RELS:3103) Biblical Archaeology1-3 s.h.
032:105 (RELS:3105) The World of the Old Testament3 s.h.
032:107 (RELS:3320)/20E:107 (CLSA:3420) In Search of the Good Life3 s.h.
032:109 (RELS:3340)/20E:104 (CLSA:3440) The Development of the Afterlife in Judaism and Christianity3 s.h.
032:112 (RELS:2912) The Bible in Film: Hollywood and Moses3 s.h.
032:142 (RELS:3247)/20E:147 (CLSA:3247) Banned from the Bible: Introduction to Pseudepigrapha and Apocrypha3 s.h.
032:143 (RELS:3243)/20E:146 (CLSA:3443) Early Christianity: From Jesus to the Rise of Islam3 s.h.
032:145 (RELS:3245)/20E:145 (CLSA:3445) Mythology of Otherworldly Journeys3 s.h.
032:152 (RELS:4352)/20E:152 (CLSA:4452) Qumran and the Dead Sea Scrolls3 s.h.
032:164 (RELS:3716)/20E:115 (CLSA:3416) Greek Religion and Society3 s.h.
Classics in English and Language Courses 

At least 9 s.h. from these:

032:100 (RELS:4001) Biblical Hebrew I4 s.h.
032:101 (RELS:4002) Biblical Hebrew II4 s.h.
039:111 (SOAS:2902)/20E:111 (CLSA:2902) First-Year Sanskrit: Second Semester4 s.h.
039:112 (SOAS:3901)/20E:121 (CLSA:3901) Second-Year Sanskrit: First Semester3 s.h.
039:113 (SOAS:3902)/20E:122 (CLSA:3902) Second-Year Sanskrit: Second Semester3 s.h.
195:111 (ARAB:2001) Intermediate Modern Standard Arabic I5 s.h.
195:112 (ARAB:2002) Intermediate Modern Standard Arabic II5 s.h.
195:120 (ARAB:2030) Formal Spoken Arabic2 s.h.
195:130 (ARAB:3011) Advanced Modern Standard Arabic I3 s.h.
Classics in English courses [prefix 20E (CLSA)]
Greek courses [prefix 20G (CLSG)]
Latin courses [prefix 20L (CLSL)]
ADDITIONAL COURSE
 
A course in material culture, history, philosophy, religion, or linguistics chosen in consultation with the advisor3 s.h.
MAJOR PORTFOLIO

To comply with the Board of Regents, State of Iowa, policy on student outcomes assessment, the Department of Classics has established a method to assess the achievement level of B.A. students completing one of the department's majors. Each student must maintain a portfolio that details the student's progress in attaining the objectives of his or her major. Students must register for and complete the following course.

20E:182 (CLSA:3982) Graduation Portfolio0 s.h.

The student submits the portfolio to the undergraduate advisor by midterm of the semester in which the student intends to graduate. Formal approval of the portfolio is required for graduation. Consult the undergraduate advisor for details.

Egypt and the Ancient Near East Track 

The Egypt and the ancient Near East track concentrates on the civilizations of the east Mediterranean, specifically Egypt and the cultures of Asia Minor, from the earliest times through late Antiquity.

The track is interdisciplinary; students select courses from archaeology, art, history, literature, and religion. The track provides a sound basis for preparing individuals to teach ancient civilizations of the Mediterranean and the Near East, ancient history, and ancient art history at the secondary school and community college levels. It also provides a strong liberal arts foundation suitable for further study in law, medicine, and other professions.

Students in the Egypt and the ancient Near East track choose courses in consultation with their advisors. They must earn at least 21 s.h. of the credit required for the ancient civilization major in courses listed under "Course Selection Requirements" below. They also must earn at least 15 s.h. for the major in courses numbered 100 or above, which may include classics in English courses numbered 20E:100 (CLSA:4400) and above, the Greek language courses 20G:011 (CLSG:2001) Second-Year Greek I and 20G:012 (CLSG:2002) Second-Year Greek II, and the Latin language courses 20L:011 (CLSL:2001) World of Cicero and 20L:012 (CLSL:2002) Golden Age of Roman Poetry. Transfer credit is evaluated individually.

All students must complete the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences General Education Program.

In addition to completing required course work, students maintain a required portfolio detailing their progress toward the major, which they must complete before graduation; see "Major Portfolio" below.

Students must maintain a g.p.a. of at least 2.00 in work for the major and in all University of Iowa courses.

The major in ancient civilization with the Egypt and the ancient Near East track requires the following course work.

MATERIAL CULTURE

At least 6 s.h. from these:

01H:026 (ARTH:2320)/20E:026 (CLSA:2226) Introduction to Ancient Art3 s.h.
01H:110 (ARTH:3320)/032:104 (RELS:3704) Egyptian Art3 s.h.
20E:196 (CLSA:3596)/113:196 (ANTH:3275) The Archaeology of Ancient Egypt3 s.h.
113:188 (ANTH:3242) Archaeology of the Middle East--Prehistory and Early History3 s.h.
ANCIENT HISTORY

At least 6 s.h. from these:

016:001 (HIST:2401) Western Civilization I3-4 s.h.
16E:100 (HIST:4400)/20E:100 (CLSA:4400) The Roman Empire3 s.h.
16E:101 (HIST:4401)/20E:101 (CLSA:4101) Ancient Egypt and the Ancient Near East3 s.h.
16E:102 (HIST:3436)/20E:136 (CLSA:3836) Food in Ancient Mediterranean Society3 s.h.
16E:103 (HIST:4403) Alexander the Great3 s.h.
16E:105 (HIST:3405)/20E:144 (CLSA:3144) Engineering and Technology in the Ancient Mediterranean3 s.h.
16E:106 (HIST:4406)/20E:106 (CLSA:4106) Warfare in Ancient Mediterranean Society3 s.h.
20E:071 (CLSA:2461)/016:045 (HIST:2461)/032:061 (RELS:2361) Middle East and Mediterranean: Alexander to Suleiman3 s.h.
20E:081 (CLSA:1181)/152:081 (GHS:1181) Ancient Medicine3 s.h.
ANCIENT PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGIOUS STUDIES

At least 6 s.h. from these:

20E:082 (CLSA:2482)/032:082 (RELS:2182) Ancient Mediterranean Religions3 s.h.
20E:104 (CLSA:3440)/032:109 (RELS:3340) The Development of the Afterlife in Judaism and Christianity3 s.h.
20E:140 (CLSA:3340) Magic in the Ancient World3 s.h.
20E:145 (CLSA:3445)/032:145 (RELS:3245) Mythology of Otherworldly Journeys3 s.h.
20E:146 (CLSA:3443)/032:143 (RELS:3243) Early Christianity: From Jesus to the Rise of Islam3 s.h.
032:001 (RELS:1001) The Judeo-Christian Tradition3 s.h.
032:030 (RELS:1130) Introduction to Islamic Civilization3 s.h.
CLASSICS IN ENGLISH AND LANGUAGE COURSES

At least 9 s.h. from these:

032:100 (RELS:4001) Biblical Hebrew I4 s.h.
032:101 (RELS:4002) Biblical Hebrew II4 s.h.
039:111 (SOAS:2902)/20E:111 (CLSA:2902) First-Year Sanskrit: Second Semester4 s.h.
039:112 (SOAS:3901)/20E:121 (CLSA:3901) Second-Year Sanskrit: First Semester3 s.h.
039:113 (SOAS:3902)/20E:122 (CLSA:3902) Second-Year Sanskrit: Second Semester3 s.h.
195:111 (ARAB:2001) Intermediate Modern Standard Arabic I5 s.h.
195:112 (ARAB:2002) Intermediate Modern Standard Arabic II5 s.h.
195:120 (ARAB:2030) Formal Spoken Arabic2 s.h.
195:130 (ARAB:3011) Advanced Modern Standard Arabic I3 s.h.
Classics in English courses [prefix 20E (CLSA)]
Greek courses [prefix 20G (CLSG)]
Latin courses [prefix 20L (CLSL)]
ADDITIONAL COURSE

A course in material culture, history, philosophy, religion, or linguistics chosen in consultation with the advisor3 s.h.
COURSE SELECTION REQUIREMENTS

Students in the Egypt and the ancient Near East track must earn at least 21 s.h. of the credit required for the ancient civilization major in courses chosen from the following list, with at least 15 s.h. required in courses numbered 100 or above.

01H:026 (ARTH:2320)/20E:026 (CLSA:2226) Introduction to Ancient Art3 s.h.
016:001 (HIST:2401) Western Civilization I (with Egyptian/Ancient Near Eastern component)3-4 s.h.
016:045 (HIST:2461)/20E:071 (CLSA:2461)/032:061 (RELS:2361) Middle East and Mediterranean: Alexander to Suleiman3 s.h.
20E:081 (CLSA:1181)/152:081 (GHS:1181) Ancient Medicine3 s.h.
20E:082 (CLSA:2482)/032:082 (RELS:2182) Ancient Mediterranean Religions3 s.h.
20E:146 (CLSA:3443)/032:143 (RELS:3243) Early Christianity: From Jesus to the Rise of Islam3 s.h.
20G:011 (CLSG:2001) Second-Year Greek I3 s.h.
20G:012 (CLSG:2002) Second-Year Greek II3 s.h.
20G:120 (CLSG:3001) Archaic and Classical Periods I3 s.h.
20G:121 (CLSG:3002) Archaic and Classical Periods II3 s.h.
20G:122 (CLSG:3003) Classical and Hellenistic Periods I3 s.h.
20G:123 (CLSG:3004) Classical and Hellenistic Periods II3 s.h.
20G:176 (CLSG:4076) Greek Composition3 s.h.
20L:011 (CLSL:2001) World of Cicero3 s.h.
20L:012 (CLSL:2002) Golden Age of Roman Poetry3 s.h.
20L:120 (CLSL:3001) Latin Literature of the Republic I3 s.h.
20L:121 (CLSL:3002) Latin Literature of the Republic II3 s.h.
20L:122 (CLSL:3003) Latin Literature of the Empire I3 s.h.
20L:123 (CLSL:3004) Latin Literature of the Empire II3 s.h.
20L:171 (CLSL:3176) Elementary Latin Composition3 s.h.
032:001 (RELS:1001) The Judeo-Christian Tradition3 s.h.
032:030 (RELS:1130) Introduction to Islamic Civilization3 s.h.
032:100 (RELS:4001) Biblical Hebrew I4 s.h.
032:101 (RELS:4002) Biblical Hebrew II4 s.h.
039:111 (SOAS:2902)/20E:111 (CLSA:2902) First-Year Sanskrit: Second Semester4 s.h.
039:112 (SOAS:3901)/20E:121 (CLSA:3901) Second-Year Sanskrit: First Semester3 s.h.
039:113 (SOAS:3902)/20E:122 (CLSA:3902) Second-Year Sanskrit: Second Semester3 s.h.
195:111 (ARAB:2001) Intermediate Modern Standard Arabic I5 s.h.
195:112 (ARAB:2002) Intermediate Modern Standard Arabic II5 s.h.
195:120 (ARAB:2030) Formal Spoken Arabic2 s.h.
195:130 (ARAB:3011) Advanced Modern Standard Arabic I3 s.h.
MAJOR PORTFOLIO

To comply with the Board of Regents, State of Iowa, policy on student outcomes assessment, the Department of Classics has established a method to assess the achievement level of B.A. students completing one of the department's majors. Each student must maintain a portfolio that details the student's progress in attaining the objectives of his or her major. Students must register for and complete the following course.

20E:182 (CLSA:3982) Graduation Portfolio0 s.h.

The student submits the portfolio to the undergraduate advisor by midterm of the semester in which the student intends to graduate. Formal approval of the portfolio is required for graduation. Consult the undergraduate advisor for details.

Bachelor of Arts: Classical Languages

The Bachelor of Arts with a major in classical languages requires a minimum of 120 s.h., including at least 36 s.h. of work for the major. The major trains students to read the ancient Greek and/or Latin languages and acquaints them with the major works of Greek and/or Roman literature.

Classical languages students learn about the history of ancient Greece of the eighth through the fourth centuries B.C.E., where most of the modern Western notions of political, artistic, and social life are rooted. They also develop an understanding of the Roman republic and empire, when Rome established its hegemony over the Mediterranean basin, laid the foundation of law for the Western World, and spread Greece's culture to the West.

Students must complete the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences General Education Program. Transfer credit is evaluated individually.

In addition to completing required course work, students maintain a required portfolio detailing their progress toward the major, which they must complete before graduation; see "Major Portfolio" below.

The major in classical languages requires the following course work.

REQUIRED COURSES
 
Intermediate or advanced Greek and/or Latin courses: 20G:011 (CLSG:2001) through 20G:199 (CLSG:4090), 20L:011 (CLSL:2001) through 20L:199 (CLSL:4090)18 s.h.
Greek or Latin prose composition: 20G:176 (CLSG:4076) or 20L:171 (CLSL:3176)3 s.h.
Additional classics courses at any level, including a maximum of 9 s.h. in classics in English courses [prefix 20E (CLSA)]15 s.h.

The following advanced undergraduate Greek courses are offered every other year and may be repeated or taken in any sequence. They cover a broad range of prose and poetry in historical context.

20G:120 (CLSG:3001) Archaic and Classical Periods I3 s.h.
20G:121 (CLSG:3002) Archaic and Classical Periods II3 s.h.
20G:122 (CLSG:3003) Classical and Hellenistic Periods I3 s.h.
20G:123 (CLSG:3004) Classical and Hellenistic Periods II3 s.h.

The following advanced undergraduate Latin courses are offered every other year and may be repeated or taken in any sequence. They cover a range of Latin prose and poetry in historical context from the mid-republic to the third century C.E.

20L:120 (CLSL:3001) Latin Literature of the Republic I3 s.h.
20L:121 (CLSL:3002) Latin Literature of the Republic II3 s.h.
20L:122 (CLSL:3003) Latin Literature of the Empire I3 s.h.
20L:123 (CLSL:3004) Latin Literature of the Empire II3 s.h.
MAJOR PORTFOLIO

To comply with the Board of Regents, State of Iowa, policy on student outcomes assessment, the Department of Classics has established a method to assess the achievement level of B.A. students completing one of the department's majors. Each student must maintain a portfolio that details the student's progress in attaining the objectives of his or her major. Students must register for and complete the following course.

20E:182 (CLSA:3982) Graduation Portfolio0 s.h.

The student submits the portfolio to the undergraduate advisor by midterm of the semester in which the student intends to graduate. Formal approval of the portfolio is required for graduation. Consult the undergraduate advisor for details.

B.A. with Teacher Licensure

Students majoring in ancient civilization or classical languages who are interested in earning licensure to teach in elementary and/or secondary schools must complete the College of Education's Teacher Education Program (TEP) in addition to the requirements for their major and all requirements for graduation. The TEP requires several College of Education courses and student teaching. Contact the Office of Education Services for details.

Students must satisfy all degree requirements and complete Teacher Education Program licensure before degree conferral.

Four-Year Graduation Plan

The following checkpoints list the minimum requirements students must complete by certain semesters in order to stay on the University's Four-Year Graduation Plan. (Courses in the major are those required to complete the major; they may be offered by departments other than the major department.)

B.A.: Ancient Civilization

Before the fifth semester begins: at least two courses in the major

Before the seventh semester begins: at least six courses in the major; and at least 90 s.h. earned toward the degree

Before the eighth semester begins: at least eight courses in the major

During the eighth semester: enrollment in all remaining course work in the major, all remaining General Education courses, and a sufficient number of semester hours to graduate

B.A.: Classical Languages—Greek and Latin

Before the third semester begins: 20L:001 (CLSL:1001) Elementary Latin I and 20L:002 (CLSL:1002) Elementary Latin II, or 20G:001 (CLSG:1001) Classical and New Testament Greek I and 20G:002 (CLSG:1002) Classical and New Testament Greek II 

Before the fifth semester begins: 20L:011 (CLSL:2001) World of Cicero, 20L:012 (CLSL:2002) Golden Age of Roman Poetry, 20G:001 (CLSG:1001) Classical and New Testament Greek I, and 20G:002 (CLSG:1002) Classical and New Testament Greek II; or 20G:011 (CLSG:2001) Second-Year Greek I, 20G:012 (CLSG:2002) Second-Year Greek II20L:001 (CLSL:1001) Elementary Latin I, and 20L:002 (CLSL:1002) Elementary Latin II 

Before the seventh semester begins: sixth semester of Latin and fourth semester of Greek, or sixth semester of Greek and fourth semester of Latin, two more courses in the major; and at least 90 s.h. earned toward the degree

Before the eighth semester begins: enrollment in at least two or three additional courses in the major

During the eighth semester: enrollment in all remaining course work in the major, all remaining General Education courses, and a sufficient number of semester hours to graduate

B.A.: Classical Languages—Greek Only

Before the third semester begins: 20G:001 (CLSG:1001) Classical and New Testament Greek I, 20G:002 (CLSG:1002) Classical and New Testament Greek II 

Before the fifth semester begins: 20G:011 (CLSG:2001) Second-Year Greek I, 20G:012 (CLSG:2002) Second-Year Greek II 

Before the seventh semester begins: three or four more courses in the major

Before the eighth semester begins: two or three more courses in the major; and at least 90 s.h. earned toward the degree

During the eighth semester: enrollment in all remaining course work in the major, all remaining General Education courses, and a sufficient number of semester hours to graduate

B.A.: Classical Languages—Latin Only

Before the third semester begins: 20L:001 (CLSL:1001) Elementary Latin I, 20L:002 (CLSL:1002) Elementary Latin II 

Before the fifth semester begins: 20L:011 (CLSL:2001) World of Cicero, 20L:012 (CLSL:2002) Golden Age of Roman Poetry 

Before the seventh semester begins: three or four more courses in the major; and at least 90 s.h. earned toward the degree

Before the eighth semester begins: two or three more courses in the major

During the eighth semester: enrollment in all remaining course work in the major, all remaining General Education courses, and a sufficient number of semester hours to graduate 

Honors in the Major

The Department of Classics offers students majoring in ancient civilization or in classical languages the opportunity to graduate with honors in the major. Departmental honors students must maintain a g.p.a. of at least 3.50 in their first three years of classics courses. To graduate with honors in the major, they must complete two courses in honors reading during their senior year, one each semester of the year, earning 3 s.h. of credit for each course. The readings and discussions must be on an ancient author or a field in ancient history or literature chosen by the student and his or her instructor. At the end of the second semester, the student presents a long paper, which is read and judged for honors by two members of the department. Students who write an honors thesis in classical languages must be enrolled at the same time in the appropriate advanced language courses.

Departmental honors students must be members of the University's honors program, which requires students to maintain a cumulative University of Iowa g.p.a. of at least 3.33 and to fulfill other requirements; visit Honors at Iowa to learn about the University of Iowa Honors Program.

Minor: Ancient Civilization

The minor in ancient civilization requires a minimum of 15 s.h., including at least 12 s.h. in advanced courses taken at The University of Iowa. Students must maintain a g.p.a. of at least 2.00 in the minor. Course work in the minor may not be taken pass/nonpass. A maximum of 6 s.h. of work for another University of Iowa major, minor, or certificate and up to 3 s.h. of lower-level transfer credit may be counted toward the minor.

Department of Classics courses in Greek numbered 20G:011 (CLSG:2001) Second-Year Greek I or above and in Latin numbered 20L:011 (CLSL:2001) World of Cicero or above are considered advanced for the minor in ancient civilization. Appropriate courses in art, religion, history, and philosophy may be counted toward the minor in ancient civilization, if approved by the undergraduate advisor. Students who have taken high school Greek or Latin should consult the advisor.

Minor: Classical Languages

The minor in classical languages requires a minimum of 18 s.h., including 12 s.h. in advanced courses taken at The University of Iowa. Students must maintain a g.p.a. of at least 2.00 in the minor. Course work in the minor may not be taken pass/nonpass. Students may count one relevant classics department course taught in English (prefix 20E) toward the minor. A maximum of 6 s.h. of work for another University of Iowa major, minor, or certificate and up to 3 s.h. of lower-level transfer credit may be counted toward the minor.

The sequences 20G:011 (CLSG:2001) Second-Year Greek I and 20G:012 (CLSG:2002) Second-Year Greek II20L:011 (CLSL:2001) World of Cicero and 20L:012 (CLSL:2002) Golden Age of Roman Poetry, and Department of Classics courses numbered 100 or above are considered advanced for the minor in classical languages. Students may satisfy the requirements for the minor by completing 20G:011 (CLSG:2001) Second-Year Greek I and 20G:012 (CLSG:2002) Second-Year Greek II20L:011 (CLSL:2001) World of Cicero and 20L:012 (CLSL:2002) Golden Age of Roman Poetry, plus two 100-level courses, one of which may be a relevant 20E course in Greek or Roman history, culture, or literature. For a list of relevant courses, contact the undergraduate advisor. Students who have taken high school Greek or Latin should consult the advisor.

Minor: Greek

The minor in Greek requires a minimum of 15 s.h., including at least 12 s.h. in advanced courses taken at The University of Iowa. Students must maintain a g.p.a. of at least 2.00 in the minor. Course work in the minor may not be taken pass/nonpass. Students may count one relevant classics department course taught in English (prefix 20E) toward the minor. A maximum of 6 s.h. of work for another University of Iowa major, minor, or certificate and up to 3 s.h. of lower-level transfer credit may be counted toward the minor.

The sequence 20G:011 (CLSG:2001) Second-Year Greek I and 20G:012 (CLSG:2002) Second-Year Greek II, and Department of Classics courses numbered 100 or above are considered advanced for the minor in Greek. Students may satisfy the advanced courses requirement for the minor by completing 20G:011 (CLSG:2001) Second-Year Greek I and 20G:012 (CLSG:2002) Second-Year Greek II plus two courses numbered 100 or above, one of which may be a relevant 20E course in Greek history, culture, or literature. For a list of relevant courses, contact the undergraduate advisor. Students who have taken high school Greek should consult the advisor.

Minor: Latin

The minor in Latin requires a minimum of 15 s.h., including at least 12 s.h. in advanced courses taken at The University of Iowa. Students must maintain a g.p.a. of at least 2.00 in the minor. Course work in the minor may not be taken pass/nonpass. Students may count one relevant classics department course taught in English (prefix 20E) toward the minor. A maximum of 6 s.h. of work for another University of Iowa major, minor, or certificate and up to 3 s.h. of lower-level transfer credit may be counted toward the minor.

The sequence 20L:011 (CLSL:2001) World of Cicero and 20L:012 (CLSL:2002) Golden Age of Roman Poetry, and Department of Classics courses numbered 100 or above are considered advanced for the minor in Latin. Students may satisfy the advanced courses requirement for the minor by completing 20L:011 (CLSL:2001) World of Cicero and 20L:012 (CLSL:2002) Golden Age of Roman Poetry plus two courses numbered 100 or above, one of which may be a relevant 20E course in Roman history, culture, or literature. For a list of relevant courses, contact the undergraduate advisor. Students who have taken high school Latin should consult the advisor.

Language for General Education

The Department of Classics offers course sequences in Greek, Latin, and Sanskrit that students in all majors may use to fulfill the World Languages requirement of the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences General Education Program.

Students who have had previous course work or other experience with Greek or Latin should take the appropriate language placement test, which helps determine the level at which a student should begin Greek or Latin language study at The University of Iowa. The tests are offered during summer orientation programs and monthly by Evaluation and Examination Service.

Students with previous knowledge of Sanskrit should consult the department about appropriate placement.

Greek

Students who wish to fulfill the General Education Program's World Languages requirement with Greek should complete the following sequence.

20G:001 (CLSG:1001) Classical and New Testament Greek I3-5 s.h.
20G:002 (CLSG:1002) Classical and New Testament Greek II3-5 s.h.
20G:011 (CLSG:2001) Second-Year Greek I3 s.h.
20G:012 (CLSG:2002) Second-Year Greek II3 s.h.
Latin

Students who wish to fulfill the General Education Program's World Languages requirement with Latin should complete the following sequence.

20L:001 (CLSL:1001) Elementary Latin I3-5 s.h.
20L:002 (CLSL:1002) Elementary Latin II3-5 s.h.
20L:011 (CLSL:2001) World of Cicero3 s.h.
20L:012 (CLSL:2002) Golden Age of Roman Poetry3 s.h.

Some students may be able to fulfill the requirement by substituting 20L:005 (CLSL:1005) Accelerated Latin for 20L:001 (CLSL:1001) and 20L:002 (CLSL:1002) in the sequence above. Students who have taken 20L:001 (CLSL:1001) and 20L:002 (CLSL:1002) should not enroll in 20L:005 (CLSL:1005).

Sanskrit

Students who wish to fulfill the General Education Program's World Languages requirement with Sanskrit should complete the following sequence.

20E:110 (CLSA:2901) First-Year Sanskrit: First Semester4 s.h.
20E:111 (CLSA:2902) First-Year Sanskrit: Second Semester4 s.h.
20E:121 (CLSA:3901) Second-Year Sanskrit: First Semester3 s.h.
20E:122 (CLSA:3902) Second-Year Sanskrit: Second Semester3 s.h.

 

Postbaccalaureate Program of Study

  • Certificate in Classics

Certificate

The Postbaccalaureate Certificate in Classics requires 18 s.h. in Department of Classics courses numbered 100 and above (upper-level and graduate courses). The program is designed for students who have a bachelor's degree and would like further study in Greek and Latin in order to be competitive for admission to a graduate program in classics. Entry to most graduate programs requires study of both Latin and Greek, normally a minimum of three years in one language and two years in the other.

The certificate is designed to be completed in two semesters by students who enter with two years of Latin and one to two years of Greek, or vice versa. It requires 18 s.h. in Department of Classics courses numbered 100 or above (upper-level and graduate courses). At least 12 s.h. of the required credit must be earned in Greek and Latin language courses; the remaining 6 s.h. may be earned in approved advanced courses taught in English [prefix 20E (CLSA)]. Transfer credit is not accepted toward the certificate. Students must maintain a g.p.a. of at least 3.00 to remain in good standing and complete the program.

A suggested plan of study for a student who enters the program with two years of Latin and one year of Greek is as follows.

Fall semester: 

20E:198 (CLSA:4085) Postbaccalaureate Seminar0 s.h.
20G:011 (CLSG:2001) Second-Year Greek I3 s.h.
20L:120 (CLSL:3001) Latin Literature of the Republic I3 s.h.
20L:171 (CLSL:3176) Elementary Latin Composition3 s.h.

Spring semester: 

20G:012 (CLSG:2002) Second-Year Greek II3 s.h.
20L:121 (CLSL:3002) Latin Literature of the Republic II3 s.h.
One elective with prefix 20E, 20G, or 20L numbered 100 or above3 s.h.

A suggested plan of study for a student who enters the program with two years of Latin and two years of Greek is as follows.

Fall semester: 

20E:198 (CLSA:4085) Postbaccalaureate Seminar0 s.h.
20G:120 (CLSG:3001) Archaic and Classical Periods I3 s.h.
20L:120 (CLSL:3001) Latin Literature of the Republic I3 s.h.
20L:171 (CLSL:3176) Elementary Latin Composition3 s.h.

Spring semester: 

20G:121 (CLSG:3002) Archaic and Classical Periods II3 s.h.
20L:121 (CLSL:3002) Latin Literature of the Republic II3 s.h.
One elective with prefix 20E, 20G, or 20L numbered 100 or above3 s.h.

Students who complete the program successfully receive a certificate from the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and a letter from the Department of Classics.

Admission

Applicants must have a baccalaureate degree from an accredited college or university and a minimum of two years of language study (two years of Latin or two years of Greek, or one year of each). In unusual circumstances, students with less language preparation may be admitted.

Applicants who are not enrolled in a graduate or professional program may apply to The University of Iowa as undergraduate transfer students; they must state on their application that they are applying to the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences for admission to the classics postbaccalaureate certificate program. They must submit transcripts confirming preparation for certificate language study, a statement of purpose, scores on the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) General Test, a writing sample, and three letters of recommendation from faculty members at their baccalaureate institution.

Graduate Programs of Study

  • Master of Arts and Doctor of Philosophy in classics
  • Master of Arts in Greek
  • Master of Arts in Latin

Applicants must meet the admission requirements of the Graduate College; see the Manual of Rules and Regulations of the Graduate College or the Graduate College section of the Catalog.

Master of Arts

The Master of Arts program in classics, Greek, or Latin requires a minimum of 30 s.h. in courses numbered 101 or above. Students may count a maximum of 12 s.h. earned in courses numbered 101-199 toward the degree. Courses taken to compete the Postbaccalaureate Certificate in Classics do not count toward the degree.

Students must pass a sight examination in the language(s) studied and an examination on literature and history.

Doctor of Philosophy

The Doctor of Philosophy program in classics requires a minimum of 72 s.h. of graduate credit, including the courses listed below (27 s.h.). Students may count no more than 12 s.h. earned in courses numbered 101-199 toward the degree. Courses taken to complete the Postbaccalaureate Certificate in Classics may not be counted toward the degree.

Students also must take precomprehensive and comprehensive examinations and write a dissertation.

Required Courses
 
20G:176 (CLSG:4076) Greek Composition (or equivalent)3 s.h.
20G:204 (CLSG:5001) Archaic Greek Literature3 s.h.
20G:205 (CLSG:5002) Classical and Hellenistic Literature3 s.h.
20L:204 (CLSL:5001) Republican Literature3 s.h.
20L:205 (CLSL:5002) Imperial Literature3 s.h.
20L:272 (CLSL:6076) Advanced Latin Composition (or equivalent)3 s.h.
Two graduate-level courses in cognate subjects such as anthropology, art history, linguistics, philosophy, or rhetoric6 s.h.
Other interdisciplinary courses (with approval of the graduate advisor)

The remaining course work is made up of Department of Classics and other courses.

Ph.D. Examinations

Ph.D. students must take precomprehensive exams in Latin sight reading and Greek sight reading and must attempt one sight reading exam by the end of their first year of graduate study. Competence in reading both German and French must be demonstrated by the end of the second year of study.

Students must take the second-year exam at the end of their second year. The remaining exams may be taken in any sequence. Students must file a request for the fourth-year comprehensive exam at least three weeks before the date of the exam.

Sight-reading exam:

Latin: four hours, written
Greek: four hours, written

Second-year exam:

Literature and history: four hours, written

Fourth-year comprehensive exam:

Greek and Roman history/material culture based on reading list: three hours, written
Latin literature, based on reading list: three hours, written
Greek literature, based on reading list: three hours, written

If a student performs unsatisfactorily on either or both of the Latin and Greek reading list exams, the director of graduate studies sets up an oral exam in order to review questions on which the student did not exhibit sufficient knowledge.

Special field or author (Greek): four hours, written
Special field or author (Latin): four hours, written

Facilities

University of Iowa Libraries' Main Library and the Art Library house extensive collections of classical texts and uninterrupted runs of classical periodicals from 1850 that facilitate research in the major areas of Greek and Roman civilization. The Department of Classics has a varied collection of slides on classical subjects and a small library of reference works, texts, and issues of classical and archaeological journals. The department's classical museum contains a small collection of coins, vases, and facsimiles in bronze from Mycenae, Pompeii, and Herculaneum.

The University is a supporting institution of the American School of Classical Studies at Athens, the American Academy in Rome, and the Intercollegiate Center for Classical Studies in Rome. Consult the director of undergraduate studies for more information.

The department offers students the opportunity to participate in an archaeological dig during the summer. Contact the Department of Classics in mid-February for details.

Courses

Classics in English for Undergraduates

All readings for these courses are in English; previous knowledge of Greek or Latin is not required.

20E:005 (CLSA:1805) Legends and Heroes of Ancient Rome1 s.h.
Introduction to narratives of Roman heroes from Livy, Ovid, and Plutarch; background information for further study in classics.
 
20E:009 (CLSA:1809) Classics and Cinema3 s.h.
Cinematic depictions of the classical world compared with scholarly views; selected films and primary ancient sources of the same period.
 
20E:014 (CLSA:1010) Hero, God, Mortal: Literature of Greece3 s.h.
Ancient Greek literature and culture as it responded to Homer; may include genre (e.g., epic to tragedy), religion, changing concept of hero, interaction with Mediterranean cultures, myth versus history. GE: Literary, Visual, and Performing Arts.
 
20E:015 (CLSA:1020) Love and Glory: Literature of Rome3 s.h.
Main themes and works of ancient Roman literature; works reflecting conflict of personal desire and public self in Rome. GE: Literary, Visual, and Performing Arts.
 
20E:017 (CLSA:1117) The First Caesars: Julius Caesar to Nero3 s.h.
Introduction to history, politics, and personalities of the first Caesars, the Julio‑Claudians (Julius Caesar, Augustus, Tiberius, Caligula, Claudius, and Nero); conditions of the Roman social and political system that led to the Caesars; character of each emperor; changes each brought about in that system; primary and secondary sources.
 
20E:026 (CLSA:2226) Introduction to Ancient Art3 s.h.
Art and architecture of the Mediterranean world ca. 3500 B.C.E. to death of Constantine (337 C.E.); Egyptian, Cycladic, Minoan, Mycenaean, Greek, Etruscan, and Roman cultures; artistic responses to life and death; impact of breakthroughs in technology and engineering on visual culture; role of art in empire building; interrelationships of art, politics, religion. Same as 01H:026 (ARTH:2320).
 
20E:027 (CLSA:2330) Introduction to Egyptian and Ancient Near Eastern Art3 s.h.
Art and architecture of Egypt and the Near East (ca. 3500 B.C.E.) to advent of Islam; Egyptian, Sumerian, Assyrian, Babylonian, and Persian cultures; artistic responses to life and death; impact of breakthroughs in technology and engineering on visual culture; role of art in empire building; interrelationships of art, politics, and religion. Same as 01H:027 (ARTH:2330).
 
20E:029 (CLSA:1000) First-Year Seminar1 s.h.
Small discussion class taught by a faculty member; topics chosen by instructor; may include outside activities (e.g., films, lectures, performances, readings, visits to research facilities). Requirements: first‑ or second‑semester standing.
 
20E:030 (CLSA:1830) Greek Civilization3 s.h.
History, literature, art, architecture, religion, social life ca. 3000 B.C.E. to second century B.C.E. GE: Historical Perspectives.
 
20E:031 (CLSA:1840) Roman Civilization3 s.h.
History, literature, politics, religion, social structure from eighth century B.C.E. to second century C.E. GE: Historical Perspectives.
 
20E:035 (CLSA:1035) Greek Tragedy, Comedy, and the Invention of Democracy3 s.h.
What is a citizen? How shall women and men act as members of a greater society? Greek tragedy and comedy asked these questions, Greek playwrights used ancient myth to discuss their modern polis; major Greek tragedies and comedies by Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides and Aristophanes; production practices, political and social influences, interpretations by ancient and modern scholarship; select film versions of tragedies; readings in English. GE: Literary, Visual, and Performing Arts.
 
20E:040 (CLSA:1740) Writing Strategies: Word Origins and Word Choice3 s.h.
Study of words, their meanings, and their origins combined with writing; words and word histories; role of English language in the world. GE: Literary, Visual, and Performing Arts.
 
20E:071 (CLSA:2461) Middle East and Mediterranean: Alexander to Suleiman3 s.h.
GE: Historical Perspectives. Same as 016:045 (HIST:2461), 032:061 (RELS:2361).
 
20E:075 (CLSA:1875) Ancient Sports and Leisure3 s.h.
Sports, games, and hobbies in the ancient world, primarily Greece and Rome, 1500 B.C.E. to 500 C.E.; ancient Olympic games, Roman festival games; anthropology of sport. GE: Values, Society, and Diversity.
 
20E:081 (CLSA:1181) Ancient Medicine3 s.h.
Thematic examination of theories and practices of Greco‑Roman physicians, which in turn became the medical tradition of medieval Islamic world and European medicine until mid‑19th century; historical medical terms, theories, and practices. GE: Historical Perspectives. Same as 152:081 (GHS:1181).
 
20E:082 (CLSA:2482) Ancient Mediterranean Religions3 s.h.
Introduction to major religious traditions of ancient Mediterranean world; Mesopotamia, the Levant (Hebrew Bible), Egypt, Greece, and Rome; central aspects of mythology, ritual, and archaeology, individually and in comparative perspective; ancient Judaism and Christianity considered in their various cultural contexts; basic concepts for understanding cultural exchange; fundamental theories in the study of religion. GE: Values, Society, and Diversity. Same as 032:082 (RELS:2182).
 
20E:083 (CLSA:1883) War3 s.h.
Emotions soldiers have as they fight, what makes them continue voluntarily to face death, and how modern society memorializes these experiences; how literature and art transform the experience of war; human responses to war in Homer's Iliad and select Greek tragedies. GE: Values, Society, and Diversity. Same as 143:083 (HONR:1883).
 
20E:084 (CLSA:2384) Killers, Crooks, and Deviants: Ancient Law and Society3 s.h.
Transcripts of actual court cases from ancient Greece and Rome, from the seamy world of adultery and vigilante justice, insurance fraud, gang warfare, prostitution, and murder, to competitive spectacle of ancient courts where trained speakers used skills in rhetoric and facility with law to prosecute or defend crimes of presumed wrongdoers; ancient law, conceptions of justice, history, daily life, moral values, and role of public speaking in democratic Athens and Republican Rome.
 
20E:085 (CLSA:1085) Reading the Ancient City3 s.h.
How ancient Mediterranean and Near Eastern peoples from third millennium B.C.E. to fourth century C.E. described, celebrated, and deplored life in their great cities (Babylon, Jerusalem, Athens, Alexandria, Rome); readings selected from ancient literary prose, poetry, drama, and religious writings; study of popular writing (e.g., ancient inscriptions, graffiti, letters, prayers, account books, and magic spells). Same as 143:085 (HONR:1885).
 
20E:089 (CLSA:2489) Jerusalem from the Bronze to the Digital Age3 s.h.
Religious, political, and cultural history of Jerusalem over three millennia as a symbolic focus of three faiths—Judaism, Christianity, and Islam; integration of several digital learning technologies, including digital reconstructions and Google Earth tours of Jerusalem. Same as 032:089 (RELS:2289).
 
20E:092 (CLSA:2425) Messianic and Apocalyptic Prophecy in the Bible3 s.h.
Literary, historical, and theological analysis of biblical prophecies and their impact. Same as 032:092 (RELS:2225).
 
20E:094 (CLSA:2420) Jesus and His Interpreters3 s.h.
How Jesus was depicted in the writings of the early church; reasons for the different portrayals. Same as 032:094 (RELS:2320).
 

Classics in English for Undergraduate and Graduate Students

20E:100 (CLSA:4400) The Roman Empire3 s.h.
History of Roman empire from assassination of Julius Caesar through 5th century A.D.; political, economic, cultural, and social developments from the transition to imperial power to the shift of power from west to east. Same as 16E:100 (HIST:4400).
 
20E:101 (CLSA:4101) Ancient Egypt and the Ancient Near East3 s.h.
Same as 16E:101 (HIST:4401).
 
20E:103 (CLSA:3750) Medical and Technical Terminology2 s.h.
Memorization of word stems and basic medical terms, practice on computer terminal; no formal classes.
 
20E:104 (CLSA:3440) The Development of the Afterlife in Judaism and Christianity3 s.h.
Development of afterlife ideology in Jewish and Christian traditions and ideas that influenced this development, particularly as it relates to the problem of suffering. Same as 032:109 (RELS:3340).
 
20E:106 (CLSA:4106) Warfare in Ancient Mediterranean Society3 s.h.
Same as 16E:106 (HIST:4406).
 
20E:107 (CLSA:3420) In Search of the Good Life3 s.h.
Works from Greco‑Roman, Jewish, and Christian cultures to analyze various beliefs on how humans can live the good life and examine how these solutions are intimately connected to the specific conceptions of the divine world. Same as 032:107 (RELS:3320).
 
20E:108 (CLSA:3008) Greek Drama in Translation3 s.h.
Ancient Greek plays in relation to their original social and theatrical context; how Greek tragedy has been presented in modern film and theater.
 
20E:109 (CLSA:3809) Women in Antiquity3 s.h.
Attitudes toward women and the role of women in ancient Greek and Roman society; ancient authors, male and female, and modern critics. Same as 131:109 (GWSS:3809).
 
20E:112 (CLSA:3015) Classical Mythology3 s.h.
Ancient Greek and Roman myths, their interpretation by Western civilization; emphasis on flexibility of myth and its importance for art, literature, anthropological, psychological studies. GE: Literary, Visual, and Performing Arts; Values, Society, and Diversity.
 
20E:113 (CLSA:3913) Middle Egyptian I3 s.h.
Introduction to the language (Middle Egyptian dialect, c. 2200‑1350 B.C.E.), and script (hieroglyphic) of ancient Egypt; in‑class readings from passages in the chrestomathie; Pennsylvania State University video conference.
 
20E:114 (CLSA:3914) Middle Egyptian II3 s.h.
Continuation of 20E:113 (CLSA:3913); introduction to the language (c. 2200‑1350 B.C.E.) and script (hieroglyphics) of ancient Egypt. Prerequisites: 20E:113 (CLSA:3913).
 
20E:115 (CLSA:3416) Greek Religion and Society3 s.h.
From Bronze Age to the Hellenistic period, in context of Mediterranean culture; evidence such as choral hymn, inscribed prayers, magical curses inscribed on lead, architecture, sculpted offerings to the gods. GE: Values, Society, and Diversity. Same as 032:164 (RELS:3716).
 
20E:118 (CLSA:3235) Greek Archaeology and Ethnohistory3 s.h.
Archaeology and ethnology of the Greek world, from end of Bronze Age to late Roman Empire; sociocultural processes that influence development and persistence of Greek civilization. Same as 113:192 (ANTH:3276).
 
20E:119 (CLSA:3240) Roman Archaeology3 s.h.
Archaeology and ethnology of Roman civilization from Iron Age eighth‑century occupation of the Palatine Hill to the end of the Roman empire in the West, A.D. 476. Prerequisites: 113:012 (ANTH:1201) or 113:013 (ANTH:1301). Same as 113:194 (ANTH:3277).
 
20E:120 (CLSA:3820) Concepts of the City: Athens3 s.h.
Athens from Bronze Age to present; city's role in development of political democracy and religion.
 
20E:124 (CLSA:3227) Classical Greek Art3 s.h.
Art, sacred architecture from early Classical through late fourth century B.C.E.; Athens in the Golden Age. Same as 01H:127 (ARTH:3330).
 
20E:128 (CLSA:3232) Art of Early Rome: Patrons and Politics3 s.h.
Examination of architecture, sculpture, and painting in central Italy from c. 800 B.C. to the end of the Roman Republic in 27 B.C.; art in the service of social ideology and political propaganda; funerary art and its relationship to the living; artistic interactions between Etruria, Greece, and Rome. Same as 01H:132 (ARTH:3350).
 
20E:129 (CLSA:3234) Art and Culture in Ancient Pompeii3 s.h.
Art and architecture, as documents of ancient society and religion in towns destroyed by Mount Vesuvius in C.E. 79. Same as 01H:134 (ARTH:3370).
 
20E:130 (CLSA:3233) Art of the Ancient Roman Empire3 s.h.
Major developments in architecture, sculpture, and painting from the ascension of Augustus to sole ruler in 31 B.C. to the death of Constantine in A.D. 337; influence of individual emperors on the development of artistic forms; relationship between public and private art; interdependency of Rome and the provinces. Same as 01H:133 (ARTH:3360).
 
20E:131 (CLSA:4131) Digital Archaeological Modeling1-3 s.h.
Introduction to foundational theory, methodology, programming skills, and conceptual understanding necessary to model remains and reconstructions of archaeological sites in various three‑dimensional digital modeling environments. Recommendations: background in archaeology. Same as 032:124 (RELS:4124).
 
20E:133 (CLSA:3025) Advanced Topics in Mythology3 s.h.
In‑depth exploration of issues in mythology raised in 20E:112 (CLSA:3015); theories of myth, comparative mythology, reception of myth; experience applying methodologies and approaches to specific myths or clusters of myths in Greco‑Roman and world traditions. Prerequisites: 20E:112 (CLSA:3015).
 
20E:136 (CLSA:3836) Food in Ancient Mediterranean Society3 s.h.
Practices and values influenced by consumption and production of food in ancient Mediterranean societies; varied topics, including methods of food production and distribution, hierarchies of status as associated with food, food and ethnic identity, food and health, food and religion; focus on classical Greek and Roman society, Egypt, the ancient Near East, and Persia. Recommendations: familiarity with Greek and Roman civilization and history. Same as 16E:102 (HIST:3436).
 
20E:138 (CLSA:3338) Philosophy of Ancient Greece and Rome3 s.h.
Ancient Greek and Roman philosophy from its inception in Ionia in sixth century B.C.E. through the Neoplatonic philosophy of Plotinus in third century C.E., encompassing philosophies of Plato, Aristotle, the Stoics and Epicureans, and later Platonists. Same as 026:110 (PHIL:3110).
 
20E:140 (CLSA:3340) Magic in the Ancient World3 s.h.
Ancient Greek and Roman writings on magic, including ancient spells and charms. Requirements: completion of rhetoric requirement. GE: Values, Society, and Diversity.
 
20E:141 (CLSA:3041) Studies in Latin Literature3 s.h.
In‑depth look at specific authors or genres, as indicated in the subtitle, focusing on Latin literary texts from second century B.C.E. to fifth century C.E. and the post‑antique reception of those texts. Taught in English.
 
20E:142 (CLSA:3742) Word Power: Building English Vocabulary3 s.h.
Analysis of unfamiliar English words through knowledge of the history and meaning of word parts.
 
20E:143 (CLSA:3743) Word Power II: Building English Vocabulary--Advanced3 s.h.
Continuation of 20E:142 (CLSA:3742); vocabulary building through additional Latin and Greek bases; vocabulary recognition through analysis of Greek and Latin elements of English words; how words change over time. Prerequisites: 20E:142 (CLSA:3742).
 
20E:144 (CLSA:3144) Engineering and Technology in the Ancient Mediterranean3 s.h.
Technologies developed and used in the ancient Mediterranean—primarily in Greece and Rome, also in Egypt and the Ancient Near East; agriculture and food preparation; construction and architecture; technologies related to warfare. Same as 16E:105 (HIST:3405).
 
20E:145 (CLSA:3445) Mythology of Otherworldly Journeys3 s.h.
Examination of mythology of otherworldly journeys from earliest religions to Hellenistic period; historical context; comparison for common themes in their evolution over time; directed readings of mythological texts dealing with otherworldly journeys; ways in which past cultures confronted larger mysteries of life and death. Same as 032:145 (RELS:3245).
 
20E:146 (CLSA:3443) Early Christianity: From Jesus to the Rise of Islam3 s.h.
Introduction to the history of early Christianity, from the time of Jesus to the rise of Islam; focus on major movements, intellectuals, and institutions in this period; growth of Christianity in different geographical areas, including the Middle East, Greece, Western Europe, and Africa; Christian relations with Jews, pagans, and Muslims; conversion; orthodoxy, heresy, and the making of the biblical canon; martyrdom; women and gender roles; asceticism, monasticism, and sexuality; church and state; theological controversy and schisms; the cult of saints; the Holy Land and pilgrimage. Same as 032:143 (RELS:3243).
 
20E:147 (CLSA:3247) Banned from the Bible: Introduction to Pseudepigrapha and Apocrypha3 s.h.
Introduction to biblical Pseudepigrapha and Apocrapha; writings dating from third century BCE to third century CE fictionally attributed to characters in the Hebrew Bible and New Testament, or written as though they originated in the First or Second Temple periods, not included in Jewish or major Christian canons of scripture; English translations of documents from this period; key themes and interpretative techniques common throughout biblical texts that provide tremendous insight into the worlds that produced the Hebrew Bible and New Testament. Same as 032:142 (RELS:3247).
 
20E:150 (CLSA:3650) Gender and Sexuality in the Ancient World3 s.h.
Survey of gender and sexuality issues in the social, political, and religious life of ancient Greece and Rome; evidence from literature, the visual arts, archaeology. Requirements: completion of rhetoric requirement and sophomore standing. GE: Values, Society, and Diversity. Same as 131:152 (GWSS:3650).
 
20E:151 (CLSA:3151) Roman Law3 s.h.
Case‑based introduction to Roman law; principles of Roman law ranging from standards of evidence to trial procedures to various topics in civil and criminal law, including family law and the law of delict. Recommendations: some background in Roman history. Same as 16E:115 (HIST:3151).
 
20E:152 (CLSA:4452) Qumran and the Dead Sea Scrolls3 s.h.
Introduction to the Dead Sea Scrolls and their relationship to other early Jewish sectarian movements; extensive reading of the Scrolls in English translation, examination of Qumran site archaeology, and survey of broader sociopolitical context of Second Temple Judaism (586 BCE to 135 CE) out of which the scrolls emerged. Same as 032:152 (RELS:4352).
 
20E:180 (CLSA:3980) Teaching in the Classics1,3 s.h.
Instructional approaches and issues in teaching ancient language and civilization at secondary and college levels. Prerequisites: 20G:002 (CLSG:1002) or 20L:002 (CLSL:1002).
 
20E:181 (CLSA:4181) History of Western Medicine3 s.h.
Development and systematization of medical thought and practice in European Middle Ages from late antiquity to Renaissance; transmission of ancient Greek and Arabic medieval thought into Latin; rise of hospitals; development of medical schools; influence of Christianity; special attention to university curricula (e.g., Articella, anatomy, semiotics, prognosis, therapeutics).
 
20E:182 (CLSA:3982) Graduation Portfolio0 s.h.
Submission of final graduation portfolio required for classical languages and ancient civilization majors. Requirements: classical languages or ancient civilization major, and senior standing.
 
20E:183 (CLSA:4501) Archaeological Methodology and Field Research3 s.h.
Beginning skills in archaeological site surveying and excavation, lab work, record keeping, pottery identification and classification, data visualization; basic archaeological theory and field methods for excavation, record keeping, and pottery identification for students with no prior archaeological experience; advanced archaeological field methods for students with prior archaeological field experience.
 
20E:185 (CLSA:4502) Archaeology and History of Judea3 s.h.
History of the ancient province of Judea (modern Israel) from Early Bronze Age to Greco‑Roman period.
 
20E:190 (CLSA:4095) Honors Readingsarr.
Discussion, readings, research for a paper on ancient civilization. Requirements: ancient civilization major.
 
20E:196 (CLSA:3596) The Archaeology of Ancient Egypt3 s.h.
Introduction to the archaeology of ancient Egypt from predynastic times to Roman Egypt, including monumental architecture; patterns of everyday life; social, economic, and demographic considerations; history of archaeology in Egypt. Prerequisites: 113:012 (ANTH:1201). Same as 113:196 (ANTH:3275).
 
20E:198 (CLSA:4085) Postbaccalaureate Seminar0 s.h.
Current work of postbaccalaureate students; preparation of writing sample and portfolio. Requirements: postbaccalaureate certificate enrollment.
 
20E:199 (CLSA:4090) Private Assignmentsarr.
Readings in classical literature in translation.
 

Classics in English for Graduate Students

20E:201 (CLSA:6990) Topics in Comparative Romance Linguistics3 s.h.
Comparative study of phonology, morphology, or syntax of the main Romance languages as informed by linguistic theory; diachronic or synchronic perspective. Recommendations: additional graduate course work in linguistics. Same as 103:262 (LING:6190), 035:207 (SPAN:6190), 164:262 (SLA:6302).
 
20E:210 (CLSA:6910) Graduate Pedagogy1 s.h.
Pedagogical theories on teaching classics in translation, practical application of those theories; classroom management, grading, syllabus development; university, college, and department regulations. Requirements: graduate standing, and teaching assistant or instructor in classics courses taught in English.
 
20E:220 (CLSA:5010) Proseminar in Classics1 s.h.
Texts, techniques, and trends in classical scholarship; areas and subtopics of classical scholarship.
 
20E:230 (CLSA:6310) Classical Rhetoric3 s.h.
Discourse in the ancient world. Same as 036:310 (COMM:6310).
 
20E:326 (CLSA:6200) Seminar: Problems in Ancient Art3 s.h.
Key themes and issues in ancient art. Same as 01H:320 (ARTH:6300).
 

Greek for Undergraduates

20G:001 (CLSG:1001) Classical and New Testament Greek I3,5 s.h.
Introduction to ancient Greek; Greek readings from all periods, from Homer and classical Greek poetry and prose to Christian writings and beyond; focus on classical and New Testament works, Greek culture and thought; comprehension, vocabulary, structure of Greek words and sentences; first of two‑semester sequence. GE: World Languages First Level Proficiency.
 
20G:002 (CLSG:1002) Classical and New Testament Greek II3,5 s.h.
Continuation of 20G:001 (CLSG:1001); focus on classical and New Testament works, Greek culture and thought, comprehension, vocabulary, structure of Greek words and sentences; increased emphasis on original texts. Prerequisites: 20G:001 (CLSG:1001). GE: World Languages Second Level Proficiency.
 
20G:011 (CLSG:2001) Second-Year Greek I3 s.h.
Focus on reading Greek prose authors, such as Xenophon and Plato. Prerequisites: 20G:002 (CLSG:1002). GE: World Languages Second Level Proficiency.
 
20G:012 (CLSG:2002) Second-Year Greek II3 s.h.
Continuation of 20G:011 (CLSG:2001); focus on reading and interpretation of Greek poetry. Prerequisites: 20G:011 (CLSG:2001). GE: World Languages Fourth Level Proficiency.
 

Greek for Undergraduate and Graduate Students

20G:120 (CLSG:3001) Archaic and Classical Periods I3 s.h.
Readings in major Greek authors of the Archaic and Classical periods. Prerequisites: 20G:012 (CLSG:2002).
 
20G:121 (CLSG:3002) Archaic and Classical Periods II3 s.h.
Continuation of 20G:120 (CLSG:3001). Prerequisites: 20G:012 (CLSG:2002).
 
20G:122 (CLSG:3003) Classical and Hellenistic Periods I3 s.h.
Readings in Greek literature of the Classical and Hellenistic periods. Prerequisites: 20G:012 (CLSG:2002). Same as 032:122 (RELS:3003).
 
20G:123 (CLSG:3004) Classical and Hellenistic Periods II3 s.h.
Continuation of  20G:122 (CLSG:3003). Prerequisites: 20G:012 (CLSG:2002).
 
20G:176 (CLSG:4076) Greek Composition3 s.h.
Review of Greek morphology, syntax, sentence structure; composition of sentences, short passages in Greek.
 
20G:190 (CLSG:4095) Honors Readingsarr.
Discussion, readings, research for a paper on Greek literature, history, or civilization. Requirements: classical languages major.
 
20G:199 (CLSG:4090) Private Assignments1-3 s.h.
Directed reading and study with faculty member.
 

Greek for Graduate Students

Courses numbered 20G:222 (CLSG:6011) Archaic Greece and 20G:223 (CLSG:6013) Hellenistic Greece cover topics from the major genres and periods of Greek literature. They are offered on a four-year cycle.

Courses numbered 20G:222 (CLSG:6011) Archaic Greece, 20G:223 (CLSG:6013) Hellenistic Greece, and 20G:228 (CLSG:6012) Classical Greece cover authors, genres, and topics of the major periods of Greek history. Specific topics are determined by the instructor's expertise and research interests. Ph.D. students are exposed to topics in all major periods at least once in four years of course work.

20G:202 (CLSG:7090) Advanced Readingarr.
Requirements: classics graduate standing.
 
20G:204 (CLSG:5001) Archaic Greek Literature3 s.h.
Introductory survey of Greek literature and language from Homer to end of the fifth century.
 
20G:205 (CLSG:5002) Classical and Hellenistic Literature3 s.h.
Introductory survey of Greek literature and language in and after the fourth century B.C.E.
 
20G:210 (CLSG:6910) Graduate Pedagogy1 s.h.
Pedagogical theories on teaching classical languages, practical application of those theories; classroom management, grading, syllabus development; university, college, and department regulations. Requirements: graduate standing, and teaching assistant or instructor in Greek.
 
20G:222 (CLSG:6011) Archaic Greecearr.
Topics chosen from Homer, Hesiod, Homeric hymns or lyric poetry.
 
20G:223 (CLSG:6013) Hellenistic Greecearr.
Authors, genres, and topics from the death of Alexander to the accession of Augustus.
 
20G:228 (CLSG:6012) Classical Greecearr.
Authors, genres, and topics from the fourth and fifth centuries B.C.E.
 
20G:229 (CLSG:6014) Roman Greecearr.
Greek authors of the Second Sophistic, including Plutarch, Lucian, and Philostratus; seminar.
 
20G:291 (CLSG:7080) Greek Thesisarr.
For Ph.D. students writing a dissertation. Requirements: Ph.D. candidacy.
 

Latin for Undergraduates

20L:001 (CLSL:1001) Elementary Latin I3,5 s.h.
Focus on reading Latin and on Roman culture. GE: World Languages First Level Proficiency.
 
20L:002 (CLSL:1002) Elementary Latin II3,5 s.h.
Continuation of 20L:001 (CLSL:1001). Prerequisites: 20L:001 (CLSL:1001). GE: World Languages Second Level Proficiency.
 
20L:005 (CLSL:1005) Accelerated Latin3,5 s.h.
Combines two semesters of Latin in one semester. Duplicates 20L:001 (CLSL:1001) and 20L:002 (CLSL:1002); additional credit will not be earned by those who take 20L:001 (CLSL:1001)20L:002 (CLSL:1002),  and 20L:005 (CLSL:1005). Recommendations: experience learning a foreign language. GE: World Languages Second Level Proficiency.
 
20L:011 (CLSL:2001) World of Cicero3 s.h.
Focus on reading Latin prose authors, such as Caesar and Cicero. Prerequisites: 20L:002 (CLSL:1002). GE: World Languages Second Level Proficiency.
 
20L:012 (CLSL:2002) Golden Age of Roman Poetry3 s.h.
Focus on reading and interpretation of Roman poets, such as Vergil and Catullus. Prerequisites: 20L:011 (CLSL:2001). GE: World Languages Second Level Proficiency.
 

Latin for Undergraduate and Graduate Students

20L:120 (CLSL:3001) Latin Literature of the Republic I3 s.h.
Prose or poetry by major authors of the republic. Prerequisites: 20L:012 (CLSL:2002).
 
20L:121 (CLSL:3002) Latin Literature of the Republic II3 s.h.
Continuation of 20L:120 (CLSL:3001). Prerequisites: 20L:012 (CLSL:2002).
 
20L:122 (CLSL:3003) Latin Literature of the Empire I3 s.h.
Prose or poetry by major authors of the empire. Prerequisites: 20L:012 (CLSL:2002).
 
20L:123 (CLSL:3004) Latin Literature of the Empire II3 s.h.
Continuation of 20L:122 (CLSL:3003). Prerequisites: 20L:012 (CLSL:2002).
 
20L:171 (CLSL:3176) Elementary Latin Composition3 s.h.
Review of Latin morphology, syntax, sentence structure; composition of sentences, short passages in Latin. Prerequisites: 20L:012 (CLSL:2002).
 
20L:190 (CLSL:4095) Honors Readings3 s.h.
Discussions, readings, research for a paper on Roman literature, history, or civilization. Requirements: classical languages major.
 
20L:199 (CLSL:4090) Private Assignments1-3 s.h.
Directed reading and study with faculty member for advanced students.
 

Latin for Graduate Students

Courses numbered 20L:222 (CLSL:6012) Augustan Rome through 20L:225 cover topics from the major genres and periods of Latin literature. They are offered on a four-year cycle.

Courses numbered 20L:220 (CLSL:6011) Republican Rome, 20L:228 (CLSL:6014) Later Empire, and 20L:229 (CLSL:6013) Tiberius to Trajan cover authors, genres, and topics of the major periods of Roman history. Specific topics are determined by the instructor's expertise and research interests. Ph.D. students are exposed to topics in all major periods at least once in four years of course work.

20L:202 (CLSL:7090) Advanced Readingarr.
Requirements: classics graduate standing.
 
20L:204 (CLSL:5001) Republican Literature3 s.h.
Introductory survey of Latin literature and language from the early Republic to the end of the first century B.C.E.
 
20L:205 (CLSL:5002) Imperial Literature3 s.h.
Introductory survey of Latin literature and language from the Augustan age through the second century C.E.
 
20L:210 (CLSL:6910) Graduate Pedagogy1 s.h.
Pedagogical theories on teaching classical languages, practical application of those theories; classroom management, grading, syllabus development; university, college, and department regulations. Requirements: teaching assistant or instructor in Latin.
 
20L:220 (CLSL:6011) Republican Romearr.
Authors and topics from the beginnings of Roman literature to the death of Julius Caesar.
 
20L:222 (CLSL:6012) Augustan Romearr.
Authors and topics from the death of Caesar to the accession of Tiberius.
 
20L:228 (CLSL:6014) Later Empirearr.
Authors and topics from the third through fifth centuries C.E.
 
20L:229 (CLSL:6013) Tiberius to Trajanarr.
Authors and topics from the first and second centuries C.E. Same as 032:229 (RELS:6040).
 
20L:272 (CLSL:6076) Advanced Latin Compositionarr.
Writing of extended prose passages in Latin.
 
20L:291 (CLSL:7080) Latin Thesisarr.
For Ph.D. students writing a dissertation. Requirements: Ph.D. candidacy.
 

Sanskrit for Undergraduate and Graduate Students

20E:110 (CLSA:2901) First-Year Sanskrit: First Semester4 s.h.
Grammar, basic vocabulary; elementary readings. Offered fall semesters of even years. Requirements: undergraduate standing. GE: World Languages First Level Proficiency. Same as 039:110 (SOAS:2901).
 
20E:111 (CLSA:2902) First-Year Sanskrit: Second Semester4 s.h.
Readings in epic and story literature. Offered spring semesters of odd years. Prerequisites: 039:110 (SOAS:2901). Requirements: undergraduate standing. GE: World Languages Second Level Proficiency. Same as 039:111 (SOAS:2902).
 
20E:121 (CLSA:3901) Second-Year Sanskrit: First Semester3 s.h.
Readings in epic and puranic texts. Offered fall semesters of odd years. Prerequisites: 039:111 (SOAS:2902). Requirements: undergraduate standing. GE: World Languages Second Level Proficiency. Same as 039:112 (SOAS:3901).
 
20E:122 (CLSA:3902) Second-Year Sanskrit: Second Semester3 s.h.
The Bhagavadgita and related religious/philosophical texts. Offered spring semesters of even years. Prerequisites: 039:112 (SOAS:3901). Requirements: undergraduate standing. GE: World Languages Fourth Level Proficiency. Same as 039:113 (SOAS:3902).