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Chemistry

Chair

  • Mark A. Arnold (Edwin B. Green Chair in Laser Chemistry)

Professors

  • Mark A. Arnold (Edwin B. Green Chair in Laser Chemistry), M. Lei Geng, James B. Gloer (Roy J. Carver/Ralph L. Shriner Professor), Vicki H. Grassian (F. Wendell Miller Professor; Chemistry/Chemical and Biochemical Engineering/Occupational and Environmental Health/Education), Amnon Kohen, Sarah C. Larsen, Leonard R. MacGillivray, Daniel M. Quinn, Gary W. Small, David F. Wiemer (F. Wendell Miller Professor; Pharmacology/Chemistry)

Associate professors

  • Ned Bowden, Christopher M. Cheatum, Renee S. Cole, Gregory K. Friestad, Edward G. Gillan, Amanda J. Haes, Johna Leddy, Claudio Margulis, Louis Messerle (Radiology/Chemistry), Hien M. Nguyen, F. Christopher Pigge, Mark A. Young

Assistant professors

  • Mishtu Dey, Tori Z. Forbes, Sarah E. Mason, Jan-Uwe Rohde, Scott K. Shaw, Elizabeth A. Stone, Alexei V. Tivanski

Lecturers

  • Russell G. Larsen, Mona A. Maalouf, Amy E. Strathman

Professors emeriti

  • Donald J. Burton, E. David Cater, Robert E. Coffman, Leodis Davis, John R. Doyle, H. Bruce Friedrich, Harold M. Goff, Donald J. Pietrzyk, Dwight C. Tardy

Associate professor emeritus

  • Darrell P. Eyman
Undergraduate major: chemistry (B.A., B.S.)
Undergraduate minor: chemistry
Graduate degrees: M.S.in chemistry; Ph.D. in chemistry
Web site: http://www.chem.uiowa.edu/


Undergraduate Programs of Study

  • Major in chemistry (Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science)
  • Minor in chemistry

The undergraduate major in chemistry provides a strong foundation for success in graduate and professional study and for positions in academic or industrial chemistry.

Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science

The Bachelor of Arts with a major in chemistry requires a minimum of 120 s.h., including 53-55 s.h. of work for the major (17 s.h. in foundation chemistry courses, 20 s.h. in advanced chemistry, and 16-18 s.h. in supporting course work). B.A. students must earn at least 11 s.h. in advanced chemistry at The University of Iowa.

The Bachelor of Science with a major in chemistry requires a minimum of 120 s.h., including 68-70 s.h. of work for the major (17 s.h. in foundation chemistry courses, 29 s.h. in advanced chemistry, and 22-24 s.h. in supporting course work). B.S. students must earn at least 20 s.h. in advanced chemistry courses at The University of Iowa.

The chemistry major for the Bachelor of Arts provides a more general education than the B.S. program offers and may be the degree of choice for students who are interested in earning licensure to teach in secondary schools (see "B.A. or B.S. with Teacher Licensure" below). Advanced courses in chemistry, biology, mathematics, physics, or other science disciplines are recommended as electives for B.A. students. Those who choose appropriate electives may meet entrance requirements for graduate or professional programs such as chemistry, biochemistry, medicine, or dentistry. Graduates also may pursue careers and education in business, law, and other areas.

The chemistry major for the Bachelor of Science is certified by the American Chemical Society. Current and projected demand for Bachelor of Science graduates in chemistry is excellent in research and in control and process-development work. The program also provides all the prerequisites for graduate work in chemistry or biochemistry and in other biomedical areas with a molecular focus.

Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science students take the same chemistry foundation, integral calculus, and introductory physics courses and several of the same advanced chemistry courses. Bachelor of Science students take more advanced chemistry courses plus science electives, which may include research. All students must complete the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences General Education Program.

Courses in the chemistry major have prerequisites, so they must be taken in the correct order. Advanced chemistry courses are built on the chemistry foundation courses. Most advanced courses are taught only once a year. Students should consult their academic advisors and plan their course schedules carefully. They should take 004:021 (CHEM:2021) Basic Measurements during the first semester of the second year.

The major in chemistry requires the following course work.

Chemistry Foundation Courses (B.A. AND B.S.)

All students (Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science) complete the following foundation courses.

One of these sequences: 

004:011 (CHEM:1110)-004:012 (CHEM:1120) Principles of Chemistry I-II8 s.h.
004:018 (CHEM:1180)-004:019 (CHEM:1190)-004:020 (CHEM:1200) Chemical Science I-II - Chemical Science Laboratory8 s.h.

One of these sequences: 

004:121 (CHEM:2210)-004:122 (CHEM:2220) Organic Chemistry I-II6 s.h.
004:123 (CHEM:2230)-004:124 (CHEM:2240) Organic Chemistry I for Majors - Organic Chemistry II for Majors (preferred)6 s.h.

One of these: 

004:141 (CHEM:2410) Organic Chemistry Laboratory3 s.h.
004:142 (CHEM:2420) Organic Chemistry Laboratory for Majors (preferred)3 s.h.
Advanced Chemistry (B.A. AND B.S.)

All students complete these:

004:021 (CHEM:2021) Basic Measurements3 s.h.
004:111 (CHEM:3110)-004:112 (CHEM:3120) Analytical Chemistry I-II6 s.h.
004:125 (CHEM:3250) Inorganic Chemistry2 s.h.
004:131 (CHEM:4431)-004:132 (CHEM:4432) Physical Chemistry I-II6 s.h.
Additional Advanced Chemistry (B.A.)

Bachelor of Arts students complete one of these:

004:143 (CHEM:3430) Analytical Measurements3 s.h.
004:144 (CHEM:3440) Physical Measurements3 s.h.
004:153 (CHEM:3530) Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory3 s.h.
Additional Advanced Chemistry (B.S.)

Bachelor of Science students complete all of these: 

004:143 (CHEM:3430) Analytical Measurements3 s.h.
004:144 (CHEM:3440) Physical Measurements3 s.h.
004:153 (CHEM:3530) Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory3 s.h.
004:170 (CHEM:4270) Advanced Inorganic Chemistry3 s.h.
Integral Calculus (B.A. AND B.S.)

All students complete one of these sequences: 

22M:025 (MATH:1850)-22M:026 (MATH:1860) Calculus I-II (preferred)10 s.h.
22M:031 (MATH:1550)-22M:032 (MATH:1560) Engineering Mathematics I: Single Variable Calculus - Engineering Mathematics II: Multivariable Calculus8 s.h.
Introductory Physics (B.A. AND B.S.)

All students complete one of these sequences: 

029:011 (PHYS:1511)-029:012 (PHYS:1512) College Physics I-II8 s.h.
029:081 (PHYS:1611)-029:082 (PHYS:1612) Introductory Physics I-II (preferred)8 s.h.
Science Electives and Research (B.S.)

Bachelor of Science students complete a total of 6 s.h. chosen from these:

004:162 (CHEM:3999) Undergraduate Research1-4 s.h.
Advanced science elective courses

Bachelor of Science students must earn a total of at least 6 s.h. chosen from advanced science elective courses and/or 004:162 (CHEM:3999) Undergraduate Research; 004:162 (CHEM:3999) may be repeated for additional credit, up to a maximum of 15 s.h. for the course. A partial list of additional courses that satisfy the chemistry elective requirement is available from the department. Generally, advanced courses in related science disciplines beyond the introductory level and math-related courses with a prerequisite of calculus II or equivalent are accepted. Students should consult their advisors to gain approval for a course that is not on the list.

B.A. or B.S. with Teacher Licensure

Chemistry majors interested in earning licensure to teach in elementary and/or secondary schools must complete the College of Education's Teacher Education Program (TEP) in addition to the requirements for the major and all requirements for graduation. The TEP requires several College of Education courses and student teaching. Contact the Office of Education Services for details.

Students must satisfy all degree requirements and complete Teacher Education Program licensure before degree conferral.

Students who plan to use their work toward a minor in chemistry as academic background for earning teacher licensure should contact the Office of Education Services about requirements.

Students with a strong interest in science teaching may complete a major offered by the Science Education Program. Students choose from emphases in biology, chemistry, earth science, and physics and earn a Bachelor of Science degree. They may apply for admission to the Teacher Education Program. See Science Education in the Catalog.

Joint B.A./M.A.T. with Science Education Subtrack

B.A. students majoring in chemistry who are interested in pursuing a graduate degree in teaching may apply to the joint Bachelor of Arts/Master of Arts in Teaching program offered by the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences and the College of Education. Designed for undergraduates majoring in biology, chemistry, environmental sciences, or physics, the joint program enables students to earn a B.A. and an M.A.T. in five years by beginning to earn graduate credit during their fourth year of undergraduate study and by counting up to 18 s.h. of qualifying credit toward both degrees. For more information, see "Joint B.A./M.A.T. with Science Education Subtrack" in the Teaching and Learning (College of Education) section of the Catalog. Interested students should consult an advisor.

Four-Year Graduation Plan

The following checkpoints list the minimum requirements students must complete by certain semesters in order to stay on the University's Four-Year Graduation Plan. (Courses in the major are those required to complete the major; they may be offered by departments other than the major department.)

Note: Courses in the chemistry major have prerequisites, so they must be taken in the correct order. Most advanced courses are taught only once a year. Students should consult their academic advisors and plan their course schedules carefully. They should take 004:021 (CHEM:2021) Basic Measurements during the first semester of the second year. A typical chemistry course schedule and a regression list are available from the department. 

Bachelor of Arts 

Before the third semester begins: math through calculus I, 004:011 (CHEM:1110) Principles of Chemistry I and 004:012 (CHEM:1120) Principles of Chemistry II or 004:018 (CHEM:1180) Chemical Science I, 004:019 (CHEM:1190) Chemical Science II, and 004:020 (CHEM:1200) Chemical Science Laboratory or equivalent course work

Before the fifth semester begins: the courses listed above; calculus II; organic chemistry I, II, and lab; physics I and II

Before the seventh semester begins: the courses listed above; four more courses in the major; and at least 90 s.h. earned toward the degree

Before the eighth semester begins: the courses listed above, and one or two more courses in the major

During the eighth semester: enrollment in all remaining course work in the major, all remaining General Education courses, and a sufficient number of semester hours to graduate

Bachelor of Science

Before the third semester begins: math through calculus I, 004:011 (CHEM:1110) Principles of Chemistry I and 004:012 (CHEM:1120) Principles of Chemistry II or 004:018 (CHEM:1180) Chemical Science I, 004:019 (CHEM:1190) Chemical Science II, and 004:020 (CHEM:1200) Chemical Science Laboratory or equivalent course work

Before the fifth semester begins: the courses listed above; calculus II; physics I and II; organic chemistry I, II, and lab; three other courses in the major

Before the seventh semester begins: the courses listed above, six more courses in the major; and at least 90 s.h. earned toward the degree

Before the eighth semester begins: the courses listed above, and three more courses in the major

During the eighth semester: enrollment in all remaining course work in the major, all remaining General Education courses, and a sufficient number of semester hours to graduate

Honors in the Major

The Department of Chemistry offers students the opportunity to graduate with honors in the chemistry major. Honors students in chemistry must be members of the University of Iowa Honors Program, which requires students to maintain a cumulative University of Iowa g.p.a. of at least 3.33 and to fulfill other requirements; visit Honors at Iowa to learn about the University's honors program.

For honors in the chemistry major, students must complete an undergraduate research project acceptable to their research advisor and must write an honors thesis based on their research. Students register for 004:162 (CHEM:3999) Undergraduate Research or 143:100 (HONR:3200) Honors Research Practicum in order to earn credit for their research. They are encouraged, but not required, to present their research at local and regional meetings and to publish their results in professional journals. 

Minor

The minor in chemistry requires a minimum of 15 s.h. in courses offered by the Department of Chemistry at The University of Iowa, including 12 s.h. in advanced courses. For the minor, advanced courses are numbered above 100 and below 280, except 004:162 (CHEM:3999) Undergraduate Research and 004:191 (CHEM:5091) Graduate Chemistry Orientation. Students must maintain a g.p.a. of at least 2.00 in the minor. Course work in the minor may not be taken pass/nonpass.

Students who earn a minor normally complete the following course work.

Introductory chemistry—one of these sequences:

004:011 (CHEM:1110)-004:012 (CHEM:1120) Principles of Chemistry I-II8 s.h.
004:018 (CHEM:1180)-004:019 (CHEM:1190)-004:020 (CHEM:1200) Chemical Science I-II - Chemical Science Laboratory8 s.h.

Advanced chemistry—one of these sequences:

004:121 (CHEM:2210)-004:122 (CHEM:2220) Organic Chemistry I-II6 s.h.
004:123 (CHEM:2230)-004:124 (CHEM:2240) Organic Chemistry I for Majors - Organic Chemistry II for Majors6 s.h.

Advanced chemistry laboratory—one of these:

004:141 (CHEM:2410) Organic Chemistry Laboratory3 s.h.
004:142 (CHEM:2420) Organic Chemistry Laboratory for Majors3 s.h.

One more advanced chemistry course (3 s.h.), such as:

004:111 (CHEM:3110) Analytical Chemistry I3 s.h.
004:125 (CHEM:3250) Inorganic Chemistry2-3 s.h.
004:131 (CHEM:4431) Physical Chemistry I3 s.h.
004:132 (CHEM:4432) Physical Chemistry II3 s.h.
004:172 (CHEM:4372) Advanced Organic Chemistry3 s.h.

 Resources, Activities

The department offers undergraduate students majoring in chemistry and other students interested in chemistry a number of opportunities to enrich their classroom studies.

Undergraduate Chemistry Center

The Chemistry Center serves all students who take chemistry courses as well as the department's professors and teaching assistants. The center maintains waiting lists and offers other assistance with registration; returns examinations and homework assignments; schedules alternative exams; and provides information about all lower-level chemistry courses. Information about student organizations and departmental scholarships and awards also is available at the Chemistry Center.

Student Organizations

Students may join the University of Iowa undergraduate student chapter of the American Chemical Society (ACS). Chapter activities include dinner meetings with guest speakers; field trips to local industry; participation in local and national meetings of the ACS; and participation in chemistry outreach programs. Students in the ACS student chapter develop leadership, organization, and speaking skills valuable during their college experience and throughout their careers.

The department has a chapter of Alpha Chi Sigma, a co-ed chemistry fraternity. The Alpha Theta Chapter is open to students in chemistry, biochemistry, chemical engineering, and related fields. Alpha Chi Sigma sponsors many social and professional events throughout the year.

The department also supports the activities of Women in Science and Engineering (WISE), whose aim is to increase women's participation and advancement as students, faculty members, and professional staff; promote a supportive study and work environment for women; integrate women's ideas, strengths, and approaches into research, teaching, and service; and inform the public of educational and career opportunities for women in scientific and technical fields. WISE sponsors a living-learning community in Stanley Hall (a University residence hall) for first-year female students majoring in science or engineering, the Student-to-Student Support in Science mentoring program, a service learning program, and the WISE Discourse and Dining series.

Scholarships and Awards

A number of awards and scholarships are available to chemistry majors, including the American Institute of Chemists Award, the Undergraduate Award in Analytical Chemistry, the Chemistry Alumni Awards (one each for a sophomore, a junior, and a senior), the Merck Index Award, and the Viksnins, Harris & Padys PLLP Award.

Chemistry majors also may apply for the Donald J. and Margaret Burton Scholarship, Ken Sando Scholarship, Shoemaker-Strickler Scholarship, E. David Cater Scholarship, and Russell K. Simms Scholarship.

Graduate Programs of Study

  • Master of Science in chemistry, with or without thesis
  • Doctor of Philosophy in chemistry

Master of Science

The Master of Science in chemistry requires a minimum of 30 s.h. of graduate credit. The degree is offered with or without thesis, in analytical, inorganic, organic, and physical chemistry. M.S. students must demonstrate minimal proficiency in analytical, inorganic, organic, and physical chemistry by passing specific examinations or by enrolling in suitable core courses. This requirement must be completed by the end of the second year of enrollment. A g.p.a. of at least 3.00 is required for admission to the master's examination.

Doctor of Philosophy

The Doctor of Philosophy in chemistry requires a minimum of 72 s.h. of graduate credit. Ph.D. study in analytical, inorganic, organic, and physical chemistry includes minimal proficiency examinations, core courses as necessary, a minimum of 11 s.h. of advanced course work, and research.

Students who meet the course requirements with a cumulative g.p.a. of 3.00 or higher are admitted to the oral comprehensive examination upon presentation and preliminary approval of their written research proposal and research progress report; they must take the oral comprehensive examination no later than the end of their second year of enrollment.

Upon completing Ph.D. research, candidates prepare the dissertation. The final examination consists of an oral defense of the thesis, at which time the candidate presents at least one manuscript of the publishable portion of his or her thesis.

Admission

Applicants for graduate admission should have a bachelor's degree with a major in chemistry, preferably with a g.p.a. of 3.00 or higher. Most admitted graduate students receive financial support. For application information, contact the Department of Chemistry or visit its web site.

Applicants must meet the admission requirements of the Graduate College; see the Manual of Rules and Regulations of the Graduate College or the Graduate College section of the Catalog.

Facilities

The Department of Chemistry office, support facilities, and faculty offices are located in the Chemistry Building, as is laboratory and classroom space dedicated to teaching and research activities. Several faculty members have offices and laboratories in the Iowa Advanced Technology Laboratories, across the street from the Chemistry Building. See the Department of Chemistry web site for information about facilities and advanced instrumentation available for instruction and research.

Courses

Primarily for Undergraduates

Students planning to take more than one year of chemistry should take 004:011 (CHEM:1110) Principles of Chemistry I and 004:012 (CHEM:1120) Principles of Chemistry II. Students who require only one year of chemistry with no laboratory component may take 004:007 (CHEM:1070) General Chemistry I and 004:008 (CHEM:1080) General Chemistry II. Students who have not had high school chemistry or do not have strong math and/or chemistry preparation should consider taking 004:007 (CHEM:1070) General Chemistry I before 004:011 (CHEM:1110) Principles of Chemistry I; academic advisors and the Chemistry Diagnostic Test can help students determine whether to take 004:007 (CHEM:1070) General Chemistry I before 004:011 (CHEM:1110) Principles of Chemistry I.

004:005 (CHEM:1050) Technology and Society3 s.h.
Nonmathematical exploration of selected areas of technology; basic science background, current technological applications, implications for society; for nonscience majors. Recommendations: closed to students who have taken college chemistry courses. GE: Natural Sciences without Lab.
 
004:006 (CHEM:1060) Technology and Society Laboratory1 s.h.
Laboratory for 004:005 (CHEM:1050); demonstrations, student experiments. Corequisites: 004:005 (CHEM:1050), if not taken as a prerequisite. Requirements: closed to students who have earned more than 3 s.h. in chemistry courses. GE: Natural Sciences Lab only.
 
004:007 (CHEM:1070) General Chemistry I3 s.h.
Atomic structure, chemical bonds, mole relations, stoichiometry, states of matter, acids and bases, reaction rates, electrochemistry, nuclear chemistry. Requirements: elementary algebra. GE: Natural Sciences without Lab.
 
004:008 (CHEM:1080) General Chemistry II3 s.h.
Organic chemistry and biochemistry. Requirements: 004:007 (CHEM:1070) or high school chemistry. GE: Natural Sciences without Lab.
 
004:009 (CHEM:1090) Supplemental Chemistry Lab1 s.h.
Lab techniques, elementary synthesis, measurement, analysis, case‑study lectures and experiments; safety glasses, appropriate dress, compliance with laboratory safety protocols required. Requirements: grade of C or higher in 004:018 (CHEM:1180) or 004:019 (CHEM:1190).
 
004:010 (CHEM:1100) Chemistry in Industry and the Economy3 s.h.
Atomic structure, chemical bonding, acid and bases, polymers, pharmaceutics, DNA, proteins, and basic economics. Requirements: non‑science major. GE: Natural Sciences without Lab.
 
004:011 (CHEM:1110) Principles of Chemistry I4 s.h.
Chemical bonding and chemical reactions; atomic and molecular structure, chemical equations, stoichiometry, gases, liquids, thermodynamics of phase changes, solutions, equilibrium, acids, bases, pH, elementary organic chemistry; the solid state, including modern materials; lecture, discussion, laboratory. Requirements: 22M:008 (MATH:1005), or ACT math subscore of 24 and ALEKS score above 65%. Recommendations: Chemistry Diagnostic Test score of 16. GE: Natural Sciences with Lab.
 
004:012 (CHEM:1120) Principles of Chemistry II4 s.h.
Continuation of 004:011 (CHEM:1110); colligative properties of solutions, chemical thermodynamics, electrochemistry, chemical kinetics, chemical bonding, aspects of industrial chemistry, nuclear chemistry; lecture, discussion, laboratory. Prerequisites: 004:011 (CHEM:1110). GE: Natural Sciences with Lab.
 
004:016 (CHEM:1160) Principles of Chemistry Lab2 s.h.
Laboratory techniques. Requirements: grades of C or higher in 004:018 (CHEM:1180) and 004:019 (CHEM:1190). GE: Natural Sciences Lab only.
 
004:018 (CHEM:1180) Chemical Science I3 s.h.
GE: Natural Sciences without Lab.
 
004:019 (CHEM:1190) Chemical Science II3 s.h.
GE: Natural Sciences without Lab.
 
004:020 (CHEM:1200) Chemical Science Laboratory2 s.h.
GE: Natural Sciences Lab only.
 
004:021 (CHEM:2021) Basic Measurements3 s.h.
Continuation of 004:012 (CHEM:1120); techniques of data collection and processing, including titrimetric and instrumental techniques for data collection and computer techniques for data processing. Prerequisites: 004:012 (CHEM:1120) or 004:020 (CHEM:1200). Requirements: chemistry major.
 
004:029 (CHEM:1000) First-Year Seminar1-2 s.h.
Small discussion class taught by a faculty member; topics chosen by instructor; may include outside activities (e.g., films, lectures, performances, readings, visits to research facilities). Requirements: first‑ or second‑semester standing.
 
004:111 (CHEM:3110) Analytical Chemistry I3 s.h.
Modern theory and practice; emphasis on chemical equilibria (acid‑base chemistry, solubility, complexation) and electroanalytical chemistry (potentiometry, voltammetry, coulometry). Corequisites: 004:131 (CHEM:4431) or 004:132 (CHEM:4432), if not taken as a prerequisite.
 
004:112 (CHEM:3120) Analytical Chemistry II3 s.h.
Continuation of 004:111 (CHEM:3110); emphasis on instrumental methods, including atomic and molecular spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, chemical separations. Prerequisites: 004:111 (CHEM:3110).
 
004:121 (CHEM:2210) Organic Chemistry I3 s.h.
Carbon‑containing compounds; structure, stereochemistry, physical properties, reactivity, reaction mechanisms, synthesis; emphasis on alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, alcohols, alkyl halides, aromatics. Prerequisites: 004:012 (CHEM:1120) or 004:019 (CHEM:1190).
 
004:122 (CHEM:2220) Organic Chemistry II3 s.h.
Continuation of 004:121 (CHEM:2210); use of spectroscopic techniques to determine chemical structures; chemistry of carbonyl compounds, amines, ethers, amino acids, carbohydrates, nucleosides. Prerequisites: 004:121 (CHEM:2210).
 
004:123 (CHEM:2230) Organic Chemistry I for Majors3 s.h.
Carbon‑containing compounds; structure, stereochemistry, physical properties, reactivity, reaction mechanisms, synthesis; emphasis on alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, alcohols, alkyl halides, aromatics. Prerequisites: 004:012 (CHEM:1120) or 004:019 (CHEM:1190). Requirements: chemistry, biochemistry, or chemical engineering major.
 
004:124 (CHEM:2240) Organic Chemistry II for Majors3 s.h.
Continuation of 004:123 (CHEM:2230); use of spectroscopic techniques to determine chemical structures; chemistry of carbonyl compounds, amines, ethers, amino acids, carbohydrates, and nucleosides. Prerequisites: 004:121 (CHEM:2210) or 004:123 (CHEM:2230). Requirements: chemistry, biochemistry, or chemical engineering major.
 
004:125 (CHEM:3250) Inorganic Chemistry2-3 s.h.
Modern principles; emphasis on descriptive chemistry of the main group and transition elements, ionic and covalent chemical bonding theories, symmetry, inorganic stereochemistry. Prerequisites: 004:012 (CHEM:1120) or 004:019 (CHEM:1190). Corequisites: 004:122 (CHEM:2220) or 004:124 (CHEM:2240).
 
004:131 (CHEM:4431) Physical Chemistry I3 s.h.
Chemical thermodynamics and its application to chemical equilibrium, phase changes and chemical equilibria; ideal and real gases; kinetic theory; surface absorption and electrochemistry; thermodynamics. Prerequisites: 004:012 (CHEM:1120) or 004:019 (CHEM:1190), 029:012 (PHYS:1512) or 029:082 (PHYS:1612), and 22M:026 (MATH:1860) or 22M:032 (MATH:1560).
 
004:132 (CHEM:4432) Physical Chemistry II3 s.h.
Quantum mechanics and its application to atomic and molecular structure; determination of structure and bonding by various spectroscopic methods; chemical kinetics. Prerequisites: 004:012 (CHEM:1120) or 004:019 (CHEM:1190), 029:012 (PHYS:1512) or 029:082 (PHYS:1612), and 22M:026 (MATH:1860) or 22M:032 (MATH:1560).
 
004:141 (CHEM:2410) Organic Chemistry Laboratory3 s.h.
Preparation, purification, identification, analysis of chemical compounds, principally organic compounds. Prerequisites: 004:011 (CHEM:1110) and 004:012 (CHEM:1120), or 004:016 (CHEM:1160) or 004:020 (CHEM:1200); and 004:121 (CHEM:2210) or 004:123 (CHEM:2230). Corequisites: 004:122 (CHEM:2220) or 004:124 (CHEM:2240).
 
004:142 (CHEM:2420) Organic Chemistry Laboratory for Majors3 s.h.
Preparation, purification, identification, analysis of chemical compounds, principally organic compounds. Prerequisites: 004:011 (CHEM:1110) and 004:012 (CHEM:1120); or 004:016 (CHEM:1160) or 004:020 (CHEM:1200); and 004:121 (CHEM:2210) or 004:123 (CHEM:2230). Corequisites: 004:124 (CHEM:2240). Requirements: chemistry, biochemistry, or chemical engineering major.
 
004:143 (CHEM:3430) Analytical Measurements3 s.h.
Modern theory and practice of laboratory methods; emphasis on experimental techniques and data analysis in spectroscopy, chromatography, electrochemistry. Prerequisites: 004:111 (CHEM:3110). Corequisites: 004:112 (CHEM:3120).
 
004:144 (CHEM:3440) Physical Measurements3 s.h.
Laboratory experience using advanced instrumental and computational methods to generate and analyze data relevant to modern physical chemistry. Prerequisites: 004:021 (CHEM:2021). Corequisites: 004:131 (CHEM:4431) or 004:132 (CHEM:4432), if not taken as a prerequisite. Requirements: chemistry major.
 
004:153 (CHEM:3530) Inorganic Chemistry Laboratory3 s.h.
Preparation and characterization of a variety of inorganic, organometallic, and coordination compounds of the main group and transition elements; emphasis on synthetic techniques, methods for characterization of inorganic species. Prerequisites: 004:125 (CHEM:3250), and 004:141 (CHEM:2410) or 004:142 (CHEM:2420).
 
004:161 (CHEM:4261) Selected Topics in Chemistry1-3 s.h.
Prerequisites: 004:121 (CHEM:2210) or 004:123 (CHEM:2230). Same as 220:161 (WRIT:3261).
 
004:162 (CHEM:3999) Undergraduate Research1-4 s.h.
 
004:170 (CHEM:4270) Advanced Inorganic Chemistry3 s.h.
Modern principles, including crystal field/ligand field/molecular orbital theory, inorganic reaction mechanisms, coordination chemistry, bioinorganic chemistry, main group and transition metal organometallic chemistry, solid‑state inorganic chemistry. Prerequisites: 004:125 (CHEM:3250) and 004:132 (CHEM:4432). Corequisites: 004:153 (CHEM:3530), if not taken as a prerequisite.
 
004:171 (CHEM:4171) Advanced Analytical Chemistry3 s.h.
Emphasis on fundamental aspects of electrochemistry, atomic and molecular spectroscopy, chemical separations. Prerequisites: 004:112 (CHEM:3120), 004:131 (CHEM:4431), and 004:132 (CHEM:4432).
 
004:172 (CHEM:4372) Advanced Organic Chemistry3 s.h.
Basic concepts from perspectives of structure, mechanism, synthesis, stereochemistry. Prerequisites: 004:122 (CHEM:2220) or 004:124 (CHEM:2240).
 
004:173 (CHEM:4873) Atmospheric and Environmental Chemistry3 s.h.
Fundamental chemical processes of importance in the atmosphere, soil, and water, with emphasis on kinetics and photochemistry of homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions, atmospheric structure and dynamics, global geochemical cycling, chemistry‑climate relationships, environmental remediation strategies; experimental methods in field and laboratory studies. Corequisites: 004:131 (CHEM:4431) or 004:132 (CHEM:4432), if not taken as a prerequisite.
 
004:175 (CHEM:4875) Introduction to Polymer Chemistry2-3 s.h.
Synthesis, structures, characterization, properties, and applications of polymers. Prerequisites: 004:122 (CHEM:2220) or 004:124 (CHEM:2240).
 
004:176 (CHEM:4760) Radiochemistry: Energy, Medicine, and the Environment3 s.h.
Fundamental theoretical concepts of radiochemistry and their application in energy, medicine, and environmental sectors. Prerequisites: 004:011 (CHEM:1110), 004:012 (CHEM:1120), and 004:121 (CHEM:2210).
 
004:180 (CHEM:4480) Introduction to Molecular Modeling3 s.h.
Theory and application of ab initio quantum mechanics, semiempirical molecular orbital theory, and molecular mechanics force fields to chemical research problems; underlying theory of these methods (with emphasis on ab initio theory) and their practical application to chemical problems; computational chemistry projects using modeling software. Corequisites: 004:132 (CHEM:4432), if not taken as a prerequisite.
 
004:191 (CHEM:5091) Graduate Chemistry Orientation2 s.h.
Pedagogy, safety and research issues relevant to advanced chemistry careers. Requirements: senior standing.
 

Primarily for Graduate Students

004:192 (CHEM:5092) Ethics in Chemical Sciences1 s.h.
Scholarly integrity for being a responsible chemist on graduate‑level research; introduction to infrastructure of scientific scholarship with emphasis on interacting with peers, funding agencies, industrial entities; responsible conduct in research in the context of creation of knowledge, dissemination of scientific findings, intellectual property, and conflict of interest; workshops to study cases in chemical research to illustrate the principles of scholarly integrity.
 
004:201 (CHEM:5299) Special Topics in Inorganic Chemistry1-3 s.h.
Prerequisites: 004:170 (CHEM:4270).
 
004:202 (CHEM:5202) Coordination Chemistry and Spectroscopy1,3 s.h.
Structure and bonding of d‑block metal complexes, theory and application of relevant spectroscopic methods, inorganic reaction mechanisms, transition metals in catalysis. Prerequisites: 004:170 (CHEM:4270).
 
004:203 (CHEM:5203) Organometallic Chemistry3 s.h.
Emphasis on organometallic compounds of transition metal elements. Corequisites: 004:170 (CHEM:4270).
 
004:204 (CHEM:5204) Physical Methods in Inorganic Chemistry3 s.h.
Application of physical methods to problems; recent developments; emphasis on magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Prerequisites: 004:170 (CHEM:4270).
 
004:205 (CHEM:5205) Bioinorganic Chemistry2-3 s.h.
The role of metal ions in biology from an inorganic chemical perspective; emphasis on structure and mechanism for transition metal‑containing metallo‑enzymes.
 
004:206 (CHEM:5806) Solid-State and Materials Chemistry3 s.h.
Introduction to the chemical concepts of solid‑state chemistry; focus on synthesis and characterization of various inorganic materials; structure/property relationships, real‑world examples. Prerequisites: 004:170 (CHEM:4270).
 
004:207 (CHEM:5107) Electrochemistry2-3 s.h.
Fundamental aspects, including mass transport and electron transfer, electrochemical methodology (e.g., voltammetry and potentiometry), determination of homogeneous and heterogeneous reaction mechanisms. Prerequisites: 004:111 (CHEM:3110), 004:112 (CHEM:3120), and 004:171 (CHEM:4171).
 
004:208 (CHEM:5108) Spectroscopy3 s.h.
Principles of atomic and molecular absorption and emission spectroscopy in ultraviolet, visible, and infrared regions of the spectrum, including fluorescence, phosphorescence, Raman spectroscopy; applications to analytical problems, with emphasis on modern instrumentation and methodology. Prerequisites: 004:111 (CHEM:3110), 004:112 (CHEM:3120), and 004:171 (CHEM:4171).
 
004:209 (CHEM:5109) Separations3 s.h.
Analytical separations; basic theory, practical applications, instrumentation, modern techniques (extractions, gas and liquid chromatography, capillary electrophoresis), and detection (mass spectrometry). Prerequisites: 004:111 (CHEM:3110), 004:112 (CHEM:3120), and 004:171 (CHEM:4171).
 
004:210 (CHEM:5110) Chemical Sensors2 s.h.
Theory, practical limitations, analytical utility based on immobilized reagents with electrochemical, thermal, optical transduction mechanisms. Prerequisites: 004:111 (CHEM:3110) and 004:112 (CHEM:3120), or 004:171 (CHEM:4171).
 
004:213 (CHEM:5199) Special Topics in Analytical Chemistryarr.
Content varies.
 
004:214 (CHEM:5114) Chemical Systems Modeling2 s.h.
Basic processes and techniques; these methods applied to systems relevant to students' own research. Prerequisites: 004:111 (CHEM:3110) or 004:112 (CHEM:3120) or 004:171 (CHEM:4171).
 
004:215 (CHEM:5115) Biophotonics3 s.h.
Structure, dynamics of biomolecules and their optical spectroscopy; ultrasensitive fluorescence spectroscopy, vibrational spectroscopy, optical activity and circular dichroism, time‑resolved spectroscopy. Prerequisites: 004:111 (CHEM:3110), 004:112 (CHEM:3120), and 004:171 (CHEM:4171).
 
004:218 (CHEM:5118) Nanomaterials3 s.h.
Basic principles associated with nanoscience and nanotechnology;  fabrication and synthesis, size dependent properties, characterization, applications of materials at nanometer length scales, recent technological breakthroughs in the field. Requirements: graduate standing or advanced undergraduate standing in engineering and science. Recommendations: knowledge of basic chemistry.
 
004:220 (CHEM:5120) Electrochemistry of Polymer Films1 s.h.
Use of electrochemical methods to characterize polymer and thin films; transport through polymer films and composites, electrochemistry of polymer films. Requirements: physical chemistry course.
 
004:221 (CHEM:5321) Spectroscopic Methods in Organic Chemistry3-4 s.h.
Methods and techniques of structure determination for organic compounds. Prerequisites: 004:172 (CHEM:4372).
 
004:225 (CHEM:5399) Organic Chemistry Special Topics1,3 s.h.
Prerequisites: 004:172 (CHEM:4372).
 
004:226 (CHEM:5326) Organic Reactions3 s.h.
Survey of organic reactions used in contemporary organic synthesis; emphasis on C‑C bond forming reactions, functional group interconversions, oxidations and reductions; mechanistic details of reaction types; innovations in catalytic and asymmetric organic reactions. Prerequisites: 004:172 (CHEM:4372).
 
004:228 (CHEM:5328) Mechanisms of Organic Reactions3 s.h.
Application of basic mechanistic concepts.
 
004:229 (CHEM:5329) Advanced Organic Synthesis3 s.h.
Preparation of complex organic compounds. Prerequisites: 004:172 (CHEM:4372).
 
004:231 (CHEM:5431) Statistical Thermodynamics I3 s.h.
Fundamentals of classical thermodynamics and equilibria; ensembles; noninteracting systems; theory of phase transitions; Monte‑Carlo methods; classical fluids; nonequilibrium systems. Prerequisites: 004:131 (CHEM:4431).
 
004:233 (CHEM:5433) Quantum and Computational Chemistry3 s.h.
Fundamental principles of quantum chemistry; angular momentum; approximation methods; theory of atomic and molecular electronic structure; applications of computational quantum mechanics to chemical systems. Corequisites: 004:132 (CHEM:4432), if not taken as a prerequisite.
 
004:234 (CHEM:5434) Molecular Spectroscopy3 s.h.
Quantum mechanical theory of molecular spectroscopy; time‑dependent perturbation theory, selection rules, lineshapes; selected applications in microwave, vibrational (infrared and Raman), electronic, optical, and magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Prerequisites: 004:233 (CHEM:5433).
 
004:235 (CHEM:5435) Chemical Kinetics3 s.h.
Potential energy surfaces, transition state theory, diffusion limited rates, linear free energy relationships, isotope effects, solvent effects, RRKM theory; connection between experiment and various theories in the gas and solution phases; emphasis on assignment of experimental error to derived quantities. Prerequisites: 004:132 (CHEM:4432).
 
004:238 (CHEM:5438) Surface Chemistry and Heterogeneous Processes3 s.h.
Fundamental and applied aspects of surface chemical processes; theories of molecular adsorption/desorption and surface complexation; kinetics; surface analysis and instrumentation; applications of surface chemistry in heterogeneous catalysis, heterogeneous environmental/atmospheric processes, and materials chemistry. Prerequisites: 004:131 (CHEM:4431).
 
004:242 (CHEM:5499) Physical Chemistry Topics1-3 s.h.
Advanced topics relevant to modern physical chemistry. Prerequisites: 004:132 (CHEM:4432) and 22M:026 (MATH:1860).
 
004:250 (CHEM:5150) Chemometrics3 s.h.
Mathematical, statistical, and signal processing methods for analytical chemistry; hypothesis testing, experimental design, model building, optimization, digital filtering. Prerequisites: 004:171 (CHEM:4171).
 
004:275 (CHEM:5875) Perspectives in Biocatalysis1-3 s.h.
Applied enzymology, protein design, structure‑activity relationships, biosensor technology, microbial transformations, biodegradation of environmental pollutants. Requirements: graduate standing in a participating department supported by the Predoctoral Training Program in Biotechnology. Same as 046:275 (PHAR:5875), 052:275 (CBE:5875), 053:275 (CEE:5875), 061:275 (MICR:5875), 099:275 (BIOC:5875).
 
004:281 (CHEM:5190) Seminar: Analytical Chemistry0-1 s.h.
 
004:283 (CHEM:5290) Seminar: Inorganic Chemistry0-1 s.h.
 
004:285 (CHEM:5390) Seminar: Organic Chemistry0-1 s.h.
 
004:286 (CHEM:5490) Seminar: Physical and Environmental Chemistry0-1 s.h.
 
004:287 (CHEM:5890) Research Frontiers in Chemistry1 s.h.
 
004:288 (CHEM:5990) Chemistry Colloquium0-1 s.h.
Presentation and discussion of research by invited presenters.
 
004:290 (CHEM:7999) Research in Chemistryarr.
Thesis work for advanced degrees.
 
004:291 (CHEM:6990) Research Seminar0-1 s.h.
Presentation and discussion of thesis research for advanced degrees.
 
004:604 (CHEM:7604) Ethics in Chemical Sciences for Postdocs0 s.h.
Introduction to infrastructure of scientific scholarship; emphasis on interacting with peers, funding agencies, industrial entities; scholarly integrity for being a responsible chemist on graduate‑level research; responsible conduct in research in context of creation of knowledge, dissemination of scientific findings, intellectual property, conflict of interest; workshop cases in chemical research that illustrate principles of scholarly integrity.