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This is a draft edition of the 2014-15 Catalog; the final edition will be published in late summer 2014.

Anthropology

Chair

  • James Enloe

Faculty

Professors

  • Michael Chibnik, Russell Ciochon (Pediatric Dentistry/Anthropology), James Enloe, Robert Franciscus, Ellen Lewin (Gender, Women's, and Sexuality Studies/Anthropology), Sonia Ryang, Toni Tripp Reimer (Anthropology/Nursing)

Associate professors

  • Margaret Beck, Laura Graham, Matthew E. Hill, Meena R. Khandelwal (Gender, Women's, and Sexuality Studies/International Programs/Anthropology), Katina Lillios, Erica Prussing (Anthropology/Community and Behavioral Health), Scott Schnell, Christian Simon (Anthropology/Internal Medicine), Glenn Storey (Anthropology/Classics)

Assistant professors

  • Elana Buch, Andrew Kitchen, Emily Wentzell

Adjunct associate professor

  • Kevin Kelly

Adjunct assistant professors

  • John Doershuk, Nathan Holton, Rachel Horner Brackett, Stephen C. Lensink, Dongwang Liu, Melody K. Pope

Adjunct instructor

  • Joe A. Artz

Professors emeriti

  • Melanie Dreher, E. Paul Durrenberger, Mac Marshall, Margery Wolf

Associate professor emeritus

  • Douglas Midgett
Undergraduate major: anthropology (B.A., B.S.)
Undergraduate minor: anthropology
Graduate degrees: M.A. in anthropology; Ph.D. in anthropology
Web site: http://clas.uiowa.edu/anthropology/

Anthropology is the comparative study of peoples and cultures past and present. The discipline's four major subfields—cultural anthropology, biological anthropology, linguistic anthropology, and archaeology—have important connections to other social sciences, physical and biological sciences, and to the arts and humanities.

Anthropology provides a framework for understanding the relation of human beings to their natural environment and to the social and cultural worlds they create and inhabit. The field provides insight into biological and sociocultural evolution and includes a focus on economic, social, and political organizations, symbolic systems, and social systems. Comparative studies of these and other aspects of past and present cultures yield information on regularities and differences.

In addition to offering undergraduate and graduate degree programs, the Department of Anthropology administers the University's Museum Studies Program, which offers an undergraduate certificate.

Undergraduate Programs of Study

  • Major in anthropology (Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science)
  • Minor in anthropology

The major in anthropology prepares individuals for advanced training or careers in anthropology, allied fields, and professional programs. Students who complete an anthropology major gain special understanding of human relations and expertise for jobs involving international or cross-cultural work, cultural resource management, and social and ethnic diversity in the United States.

Upon graduation, anthropology majors embark on careers in government, international affairs, conservation, economic development, public health, cultural resource management, urban and regional planning, social work, museum work, and education. Many go on to help resolve contemporary world problems by working with international or domestic organizations such as Americorps, the Peace Corps, and Teach for America. Some pursue graduate study in anthropology or related social sciences while others earn degrees in business, law, or the health sciences.

Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science

The Bachelor of Arts with a major in anthropology requires a minimum of 120 s.h., including 33 s.h. of work for the major. The B.A. is designed to offer a comprehensive overview of anthropology's four main subfields and the broadest possible cross-cultural background.

The Bachelor of Science with a major in anthropology requires a minimum of 120 s.h., including 39 s.h. of work for the major. The B.S. is appropriate for students with interests in any of anthropology's subfields; it offers enhanced opportunities to gain experience and develop skills in research methods and scientific reasoning.

B.A. and B.S. students may choose to complete one of four specializations: gender and culture, cultural resource and heritage management, environmental anthropology, or medical anthropology. B.S. students also have the option of completing a track, anthropology for the health professions. See "Optional Undergraduate Specializations and Track" below.

All undergraduates majoring in anthropology, including transfer students, must earn a minimum of 15 s.h. for the major at The University of Iowa. Students may apply credit earned at approved field schools offered by other institutions toward the major, with Department of Anthropology approval.

Students must complete the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences General Education Program.

Students who declare anthropology as their major when they are admitted to the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences are advised at the Academic Advising Center until they have earned 24 s.h. Students who have earned more than 24 s.h. are advised by the departmental undergraduate advisor.

The major in anthropology requires the following course work.

Common Requirements (B.A. and B.S.)

All students (B.A. and B.S.) must complete 11 courses from the lists below: five introductory courses, one course in archaeology or biological anthropology, one course in sociocultural or linguistic anthropology, one course in area studies, and three electives. Several courses are listed in more than one of these categories; students may not select the same course from more than one category.

Introductory courses—all of these:

ANTH:1001 (113:050) Issues in Anthropology3 s.h.
ANTH:1101 (113:003) Cultural Anthropology3 s.h.
ANTH:1201 (113:012) Introduction to Prehistory3 s.h.
ANTH:1301 (113:013) Human Origins3 s.h.
ANTH:1401 (113:014) Language, Culture, and Communication3 s.h.

Archaeology or biological anthropology (area or topical)—one of these:

ANTH:2205 (113:168) Archaeological Methods3 s.h.
ANTH:2216 (113:157) Foodways and Cuisine in the Past3 s.h.
ANTH:2220 (113:163) Archaeology of Mesoamerica3 s.h.
ANTH:2261 (113:113) Human Impacts on the Environment3 s.h.
ANTH:2290 (113:162) Practicum in Archaeologyarr.
ANTH:3205 (113:161) Prehistoric People of the Ice Age3 s.h.
ANTH:3206 (113:174) Seminar: Taphonomy3 s.h.
ANTH:3207 (113:158) Animal Bones in Archaeology3 s.h.
ANTH:3235 (113:197) The Stuff of Lives: Archaeology of the Material World3 s.h.
ANTH:3237 (113:124) Politics of the Archaeological Past3 s.h.
ANTH:3238 (113:130) Archaeology of the Iberian Peninsula3 s.h.
ANTH:3239 (113:150) Tribes and Chiefdoms of Ancient Europe3 s.h.
ANTH:3240 (113:170) Cultural Resources Management Archaeology: Practice and Practicalities3 s.h.
ANTH:3241 (113:169) Lithic Analysis in Archaeology3 s.h.
ANTH:3242 (113:188) Archaeology of the Middle East—Prehistory and Early History3 s.h.
ANTH:3243 (113:195) Midwestern Archaeology3 s.h.
ANTH:3255 (113:160) Introduction to Archaeological Ceramics3 s.h.
ANTH:3256 (113:173) Household Archaeology and Anthropology3 s.h.
ANTH:3257 (113:167) North American Archaeology3 s.h.
ANTH:3258 (113:159) Southwestern Archaeology3 s.h.
ANTH:3260 (113:179) Pleistocene Peopling of the Americas3 s.h.
ANTH:3261 (113:111) Our Life With Dogs: The Anthropological Study of Animals in Human Societies3 s.h.
ANTH:3265 (113:181) Archaeology of the Great Plains3 s.h.
ANTH:3275 (113:196) The Archaeology of Ancient Egypt3 s.h.
ANTH:3276 (113:192) Greek Archaeology and Ethnohistory3 s.h.
ANTH:3277 (113:194) Roman Archaeology3 s.h.
ANTH:3282 (113:126) Animals, Culture, and Food3 s.h.
ANTH:3283 (113:187) Cultures in Collision3 s.h.
ANTH:3290 (113:193) Special Topics in Archaeology3 s.h.
ANTH:3295 (113:199) Field Research in Archaeologyarr.
ANTH:3305 (213:190) Human Osteology3 s.h.
ANTH:3306 (213:115) The Neanderthal Enigma3 s.h.
ANTH:3307 (213:116) Modern Human Origins3 s.h.
ANTH:3308 (213:165) Human Variation3 s.h.
ANTH:3310 (213:188) Primate Behavior and Ecology3 s.h.
ANTH:3322 (213:170) Primate Evolutionary Biology3 s.h.
ANTH:3325 (213:151) Human Evolutionary Genetics3 s.h.
ANTH:3326 (213:153) Infectious Disease and Human Evolution3 s.h.
ANTH:3327 (213:154) Genes, Culture, and Human Diversity3 s.h.
ANTH:3328 (213:155) Molecular Genetics of Human Disease3 s.h.
ANTH:3330 (213:187) Human Evolution in Africa and Eurasia3 s.h.
ANTH:4205 (113:164) Rise of Ancient Civilization3 s.h.
ANTH:4315 (213:169) Human Evolutionary Anatomy3 s.h.
ANTH:4620 (113:189) Approaches to Geoarchaeology3 s.h.

Sociocultural or linguistic anthropology—one of these:

ANTH:2101 (113:137) The Anthropology of Love3 s.h.
ANTH:2102 (113:108) Anthropology of Marriage and Family3 s.h.
ANTH:2136 (113:116) Urban Anthropology3 s.h.
ANTH:2150 (113:115) Transnational Feminism3 s.h.
ANTH:2181 (113:147) The Anthropology of Aging3 s.h.
ANTH:3101 (113:112) Anthropology of Sexuality3 s.h.
ANTH:3102 (113:185) Medical Anthropology3 s.h.
ANTH:3103 (113:143) Environment and Culture3 s.h.
ANTH:3107 (113:109) Literature and Anthropology3 s.h.
ANTH:3109 (113:135) Psychological Anthropology3 s.h.
ANTH:3110 (113:121) Health of Indigenous Peoples3 s.h.
ANTH:3112 (113:114) Environmentalisms3 s.h.
ANTH:3113 (113:145) Religion and Healing3 s.h.
ANTH:3114 (113:142) Anthropology of Religion3 s.h.
ANTH:3116 (113:156) Fictionalized Ethnography in Literature and Film3 s.h.
ANTH:3117 (113:136) Using Ethnographic Methods3 s.h.
ANTH:3118 (113:140) Politics of Reproduction3 s.h.
ANTH:3119 (113:154) Anthropology of Sexual Minorities3 s.h.
ANTH:3127 (113:146) Anthropology of Death3 s.h.
ANTH:3130 (113:104) Cultural Politics3 s.h.
ANTH:3131 (113:117) Anthropology and Human Rights3 s.h.
ANTH:3133 (113:122) Anthropology of Race3 s.h.
ANTH:3135 (113:155) Key Debates in Sociocultural Anthropology3 s.h.
ANTH:3140 (113:141) Feminist Anthropology3 s.h.
ANTH:3141 (113:182) Women, Health, and Healing3 s.h.
ANTH:3151 (113:151) The Anthropology of the Beginnings and Ends of Life3 s.h.
ANTH:3152 (113:152) Anthropology of Caregiving and Health3 s.h.
ANTH:3300 (113:105) Mothers and Motherhood3 s.h.
ANTH:3415 (113:171) Multi-Media Ethnography3 s.h.
ANTH:4130 (113:139) Religion and Environmental Ethics3 s.h.
ANTH:4140 (113:133) The Anthropology of Women's Health3 s.h.

Area studies—one of these:

ANTH:2108 (113:107) Gendering India3 s.h.
ANTH:2110 (113:131) Latin American Economy and Society3 s.h.
ANTH:2165 (113:110) Native Peoples of North America3 s.h.
ANTH:2175 (113:125) Japanese Society and Culture3 s.h.
ANTH:2182 (113:092) African Peoples and Cultures3 s.h.
ANTH:2183 (113:093) Asia and Globalization: Anthropological Approach3 s.h.
ANTH:2220 (113:163) Archaeology of Mesoamerica3 s.h.
ANTH:3108 (113:118) North Korea and Totalitarianism3 s.h.
ANTH:3111 (113:119) Health in Mexico3 s.h.
ANTH:3121 (113:127) Love and Kinship in South Asia3 s.h.
ANTH:3142 (113:128) American Cultures3 s.h.
ANTH:3238 (113:130) Archaeology of the Iberian Peninsula3 s.h.
ANTH:3239 (113:150) Tribes and Chiefdoms of Ancient Europe3 s.h.
ANTH:3242 (113:188) Archaeology of the Middle East—Prehistory and Early History3 s.h.
ANTH:3257 (113:167) North American Archaeology3 s.h.
ANTH:3258 (113:159) Southwestern Archaeology3 s.h.
ANTH:3265 (113:181) Archaeology of the Great Plains3 s.h.
ANTH:3275 (113:196) The Archaeology of Ancient Egypt3 s.h.
ANTH:3276 (113:192) Greek Archaeology and Ethnohistory3 s.h.
ANTH:3277 (113:194) Roman Archaeology3 s.h.
ANTH:3306 (213:115) The Neanderthal Enigma3 s.h.
ANTH:3330 (213:187) Human Evolution in Africa and Eurasia3 s.h.
ANTH:4700 (113:132) Latin American Studies Seminar3 s.h.

Electives:

Three elective courses numbered 2000 or above

Anthropology electives offer many options, including courses dealing with environment and culture, expressive culture (art, verbal arts, literature, music, and dance), gender and sexuality, human evolution, human osteology, human prehistory, identity, language and culture, medical anthropology, molecular genetics, primatology, psychological anthropology, religion and ritual, and urban anthropology. Department faculty members offer area studies courses that focus on Latin America, Europe, Japan, South Asia, and Native North America.

Additional Bachelor of Arts Requirements

Bachelor of Arts students are strongly encouraged to take courses and participate in archaeological field and laboratory research, biological anthropology laboratory research, ethnographic research methods in sociocultural anthropology, and multimedia research in linguistic anthropology.

Additional Bachelor of Science Requirements

Bachelor of Science students must fulfill additional requirements in the following three areas.

Quantitative, mathematical, or formal reasoning tool
Directed laboratory or field research
Allied topical course work

QUANTITATIVE, MATHEMATICAL, OR FORMAL REASONING TOOL (B.S.)

Bachelor of Science students must complete one course (a minimum of 3 s.h.) in statistics, computing, logic, and/or mathematics in addition to the course they take to fulfill the General Education Program's Quantitative and Formal Reasoning requirement. The department accepts the following courses to fulfill the tool requirement. Students who would like to use other courses should consult their advisors.

One of these:

COMM:1117 (036:017) Theory and Practice of Argument4 s.h.
CS:1110 (22C:005) Introduction to Computer Science3 s.h.
CS:1210 (22C:016) Computer Science I: Fundamentals4 s.h.
HONR:1650 (143:080) Honors Seminar in Quantitative and Formal Reasoning3 s.h.
LING:1050 (103:013) Language and Formal Reasoning3 s.h.
MATH:1440 (22M:015) Mathematics for the Biological Sciences4 s.h.
MATH:1460 (22M:016) Calculus for the Biological Sciences4 s.h.
MATH:1850 (22M:025) Calculus I4 s.h.
PHIL:1636 (026:036) Principles of Reasoning: Argument and Debate3 s.h.
STAT:1010 (22S:002) Statistics and Society3 s.h.
STAT:1020 (22S:025)/PSQF:1020 (07P:025) Elementary Statistics and Inference3 s.h.
STAT:2010 (22S:030) Statistical Methods and Computing3 s.h.
STAT:3510 (22S:101) Biostatistics3 s.h.
DIRECTED LABORATORY OR FIELD RESEARCH (B.S.)

Bachelor of Science students complete an approved directed research requirement (minimum of 3 s.h.) consisting of one of the following.

Laboratory research: a laboratory practicum in anthropology research labs or independent, faculty-guided, laboratory research, including use of the collections of the Office of the State Archaeologist.

Field research project: faculty-advised projects involving the collection of primary archaeological, biological, ethnographic, and/or linguistic data in a fieldwork setting.

A University of Iowa field archaeological school program or approved equivalent.

An approved internship; internships typically involve work in cultural resource management firms, museums, and public health research or education projects; to receive research credit for an internship, students must make a final report to their faculty advisor, summarizing the work accomplished or presenting materials that document the nature of the work.

ALLIED TOPICAL FIELD (B.S.)

Bachelor of Science students complete a topical concentration in one of the following allied fields: biology, chemistry, computer science, earth and environmental sciences, economics, geographical and sustainability sciences, global health studies, health and human physiology, linguistics, mathematics, psychology, science education, sport studies, or statistics and actuarial science. Minors (or at least five courses) in other fields, chosen in consultation with the student's advisor, also may be applied toward this requirement.

Optional Undergraduate Specializations and Track (B.A. and B.S.)

All students majoring in anthropology have the option of adding a particular focus to their study plan by completing a specialization. B.A. students may choose one of four optional specializations: gender and culture, cultural resource and heritage management, environmental anthropology, or medical anthropology. B.S. students may choose one of the four specializations or an optional track, anthropology for the health professions.

The optional specializations and track reflect broad issues bridging subfields in and outside of anthropology. Completion of a specialization area or the track indicates the acquisition of considerable expertise and is noted on the student's transcript.

The optional specializations and track each require 15 s.h. (five courses). By selecting courses carefully, students majoring in anthropology can complete a specialization or the track without adding to the semester hours required for graduation.

GENDER AND CULTURE SPECIALIZATION (B.A. AND B.S.)

Anthropological research regarding gender and sexuality has grown dramatically in recent years, enhancing and drawing from other theoretical and methodological approaches in anthropology. This research contributes a cross-cultural perspective to discussion surrounding these fundamental aspects of human experience, both in academia and in public life.

The gender and culture specialization requires 15 s.h. (five courses) chosen from the following list. Each course provides an integrated overview of essential theoretical and topical issues in the field.

Five of these:

ANTH:2101 (113:137) The Anthropology of Love3 s.h.
ANTH:2102 (113:108) Anthropology of Marriage and Family3 s.h.
ANTH:2108 (113:107) Gendering India3 s.h.
ANTH:3101 (113:112) Anthropology of Sexuality3 s.h.
ANTH:3118 (113:140) Politics of Reproduction3 s.h.
ANTH:3119 (113:154) Anthropology of Sexual Minorities3 s.h.
ANTH:3121 (113:127) Love and Kinship in South Asia3 s.h.
ANTH:3140 (113:141) Feminist Anthropology3 s.h.
ANTH:3141 (113:182) Women, Health, and Healing3 s.h.
ANTH:3300 (113:105) Mothers and Motherhood3 s.h.
ANTH:4140 (113:133) The Anthropology of Women's Health3 s.h.
CULTURAL RESOURCE AND HERITAGE MANAGEMENT SPECIALIZATION (B.A. AND B.S.)

In North America and throughout much of the rest of the world, modern land use continually threatens evidence of past land use. Most archaeological excavations are conducted as cultural resource management (CRM), so it is essential that all researchers who work with archaeological data and individuals committed to site preservation have a basic understanding of CRM. Students who choose this emphasis learn about the field and about how to address related ethical issues as well as technical and theoretical challenges.

The cultural resource and heritage management emphasis requires 15 s.h. (five courses): a fundamental overview course, two area electives, a technical/practical elective, and a field school course. Students may use some of these courses to satisfy requirements for the major, such as the course in archaeology and the electives.

Overview—this course:

ANTH:3240 (113:170) Cultural Resources Management Archaeology: Practice and Practicalities3 s.h.

Area electives—two of these (or one of these and one other Department of Anthropology area course):

ANTH:2165 (113:110) Native Peoples of North America3 s.h.
ANTH:3257 (113:167) North American Archaeology3 s.h.
ANTH:3258 (113:159) Southwestern Archaeology3 s.h.
ANTH:3260 (113:179) Pleistocene Peopling of the Americas3 s.h.
ANTH:3265 (113:181) Archaeology of the Great Plains3 s.h.

Technical/practical elective—one of these:

ANTH:2205 (113:168) Archaeological Methods3 s.h.
ANTH:2290 (113:162) Practicum in Archaeologyarr.
ANTH:3207 (113:158) Animal Bones in Archaeology3 s.h.
ANTH:3221 (113:190) Beyond the Map: Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS) in Anthropology3 s.h.
ANTH:3237 (113:124) Politics of the Archaeological Past3 s.h.
ANTH:3255 (113:160) Introduction to Archaeological Ceramics3 s.h.
ANTH:3256 (113:173) Household Archaeology and Anthropology3 s.h.
ANTH:3305 (213:190) Human Osteology3 s.h.
ANTH:4620 (113:189) Approaches to Geoarchaeology3 s.h.

Field school—one of these:

ANTH:3295 (113:199) Field Research in Archaeologyarr.
An equivalent course from another university
ENVIRONMENTAL ANTHROPOLOGY SPECIALIZATION (B.A. AND B.S.)

The interaction between humans and the environments they inhabit has long been a central issue in anthropology, and environmental degradation is a worldwide concern today. Pollution, loss of biodiversity, and global warming recognize no political boundaries, but attitudes and behaviors involving the natural environment vary widely from culture to culture. The understanding and incorporation of these varied perspectives are vital to the development and successful use of workable solutions.

The environmental anthropology specialization requires 15 s.h. (five courses): two theory courses, which deal primarily with human-environmental interactions; and three area or topical electives, which deal in part with environment, ecology, and subsistence technologies. The following are sample courses in each area (courses must be numbered 2000 or above).

Theory courses:

ANTH:2261 (113:113) Human Impacts on the Environment3 s.h.
ANTH:3103 (113:143) Environment and Culture3 s.h.
ANTH:3112 (113:114) Environmentalisms3 s.h.
ANTH:4130 (113:139) Religion and Environmental Ethics3 s.h.

Area or topical electives:

ANTH:2110 (113:131) Latin American Economy and Society3 s.h.
ANTH:2175 (113:125) Japanese Society and Culture3 s.h.
ANTH:2216 (113:157) Foodways and Cuisine in the Past3 s.h.
ANTH:3205 (113:161) Prehistoric People of the Ice Age3 s.h.
ANTH:3207 (113:158) Animal Bones in Archaeology3 s.h.
ANTH:3238 (113:130) Archaeology of the Iberian Peninsula3 s.h.
ANTH:3239 (113:150) Tribes and Chiefdoms of Ancient Europe3 s.h.
ANTH:3265 (113:181) Archaeology of the Great Plains3 s.h.
ANTH:3275 (113:196) The Archaeology of Ancient Egypt3 s.h.
ANTH:3282 (113:126) Animals, Culture, and Food3 s.h.
ANTH:3283 (113:187) Cultures in Collision3 s.h.
ANTH:4205 (113:164) Rise of Ancient Civilization3 s.h.
ANTH:4620 (113:189) Approaches to Geoarchaeology3 s.h.
ANTH:6205 (113:178) Hunter-Gatherer Ethnoarchaeology3 s.h.
MEDICAL ANTHROPOLOGY SPECIALIZATION (B.A. AND B.S.)

Human experiences of sickness and suffering are universal yet profoundly shaped by cultural and historical contexts. Medical anthropology explores cultural and biological diversity in sickness, health, and healing through approaches that include examining individual experiences of disrupted well-being, considering how biological and cultural factors interact to promote health or produce sickness, analyzing political-economic causes of health inequalities, and applying research to improve health research and services in an increasingly global world. Course work in medical anthropology helps students prepare for a range of health professions and social services careers and for work in diverse settings that increasingly include nongovernmental organizations devoted to improving health.

The medical anthropology specialization requires 15 s.h. (five courses): one overview course and four electives that focus on particular topics.

Overview—this course:

ANTH:3102 (113:185) Medical Anthropology3 s.h.

Electives—four of these:

ANTH:2181 (113:147) The Anthropology of Aging3 s.h.
ANTH:2320 (213:090) Anthropological Perspectives on Human Infectious Disease: Origins and Evolution3 s.h.
ANTH:3101 (113:112) Anthropology of Sexuality3 s.h.
ANTH:3110 (113:121) Health of Indigenous Peoples3 s.h.
ANTH:3111 (113:119) Health in Mexico3 s.h.
ANTH:3118 (113:140) Politics of Reproduction3 s.h.
ANTH:3141 (113:182) Women, Health, and Healing3 s.h.
ANTH:3151 (113:151) The Anthropology of the Beginnings and Ends of Life3 s.h.
ANTH:3152 (113:152) Anthropology of Caregiving and Health3 s.h.
ANTH:3326 (213:153) Infectious Disease and Human Evolution3 s.h.
ANTH:4140 (113:133) The Anthropology of Women's Health3 s.h.
ANTHROPOLOGY FOR THE HEALTH PROFESSIONS TRACK (B.S.)

Health professionals are increasingly called upon to recognize how sociocultural and biological factors intersect to produce experiences of health, sickness, and healing. The anthropology for the health professions track is rooted in anthropology's holistic approach to understanding the human condition. It provides a comprehensive education in the biological and social bases for human health. Students in the track develop understanding of cultural and biological variation in health and sickness. They also examine how and why particular therapeutic interventions may be more or less effective when translated into different cultural settings and disease ecologies.

The track enables students entering the health professions to distinguish themselves when they apply to graduate and professional programs. It also may help them prepare for the Medical College Admission Test (MCAT). Learn more by visiting Optional Undergraduate Specializations on the Department of Anthropology web site.

The anthropology for the health professions track requires 15 s.h. (five courses), including a required overview course and four additional track courses chosen from the list below. Most courses in the list fulfill the anthropology major's common requirements for courses in archaeology or biological anthropology, in sociocultural or linguistic anthropology, and electives; and ANTH:3111 (113:119) Health in Mexico counts toward the major's area studies requirement. By choosing courses carefully, students may complete the track without adding to the semester hours required for graduation.

Overview—this course:

ANTH:2164 (113:091) Culture and Healing for Future Health Professionals3 s.h.

Four of these (12 s.h.):

ANTH:2181 (113:147) The Anthropology of Aging3 s.h.
ANTH:2320 (213:090) Anthropological Perspectives on Human Infectious Disease: Origins and Evolution3 s.h.
ANTH:3101 (113:112) Anthropology of Sexuality3 s.h.
ANTH:3102 (113:185) Medical Anthropology3 s.h.
ANTH:3110 (113:121) Health of Indigenous Peoples3 s.h.
ANTH:3111 (113:119) Health in Mexico3 s.h.
ANTH:3118 (113:140) Politics of Reproduction3 s.h.
ANTH:3141 (113:182) Women, Health, and Healing3 s.h.
ANTH:3151 (113:151) The Anthropology of the Beginnings and Ends of Life3 s.h.
ANTH:3152 (113:152) Anthropology of Caregiving and Health3 s.h.
ANTH:3305 (213:190) Human Osteology3 s.h.
ANTH:3308 (213:165) Human Variation3 s.h.
ANTH:3325 (213:151) Human Evolutionary Genetics3 s.h.
ANTH:3326 (213:153) Infectious Disease and Human Evolution3 s.h.
ANTH:4140 (113:133) The Anthropology of Women's Health3 s.h.

B.A. or B.S. with Teacher Licensure

Anthropology majors interested in earning licensure to teach in elementary and/or secondary schools must complete the College of Education's Teacher Education Program (TEP) in addition to the requirements for the major and all requirements for graduation. The TEP requires several College of Education courses and student teaching. Contact the Office of Education Services for details.

Students must satisfy all degree requirements and complete Teacher Education Program licensure before degree conferral.

Four-Year Graduation Plan

The following checkpoints list the minimum requirements students must complete by certain semesters in order to stay on the University's Four-Year Graduation Plan.

Bachelor of Arts

Before the fifth semester begins: at least two courses in the major

Before the seventh semester begins: at least seven courses in the major and at least 90 s.h. earned toward the degree

Before the eighth semester begins: at least eight courses in the major

During the eighth semester: enrollment in all remaining course work in the major, all remaining General Education courses, and a sufficient number of semester hours to graduate

Bachelor of Science

Before the third semester begins: at least one anthropology course or other course in the major

Before the fifth semester begins: at least four anthropology courses or other courses in the major, one course in the topical field, and one course for the quantitative or formal reasoning tool requirement

Before the seventh semester begins: at least seven courses in the major, three courses in the topical field, the second quantitative or formal reasoning tool course, and at least 90 s.h. earned toward the degree

Before the eighth semester begins: at least nine courses in the major, including the directed research requirement, and four courses in the topical field

During the eighth semester: enrollment in all remaining course work in the major (including the topical field), all remaining General Education courses, and a sufficient number of semester hours to graduate

Honors in the Major

Students majoring in anthropology have the opportunity to graduate with honors in the major. Departmental honors students must have a g.p.a. of at least 3.50 in anthropology. To graduate with honors in the major, they must conduct an independent research project that culminates in a 30-50 page thesis. The project includes completion of 6 s.h. divided between ANTH:4995 (113:186) Honors Research Seminar (offered only in fall semesters) and ANTH:4996 (113:176) Honors Research, typically taken the next semester. Honors students also must take one of their anthropology courses at the graduate level.

Students working toward a B.S. may count their directed research project or laboratory practicum toward the requirements for graduation with honors, but fulfilling the research requirement for the B.S. does not by itself fulfill the honors research requirement. Students must work with their honors thesis advisor to structure their research so that it meets the added requirements of honors work.

Contact the department's director of undergraduate studies to learn more about honors in anthropology.

In addition to honors in their majors, undergraduate students have a variety of opportunities for honors study and activities through membership in the University of Iowa Honors Program; visit Honors at Iowa to learn about the University's honors program.

Minor

The minor in anthropology requires a minimum of 15 s.h. in anthropology courses, including 12 s.h. in University of Iowa Department of Anthropology courses numbered 2000 or above. Students must maintain a g.p.a. of at least 2.00 in all courses for the minor and in all UI courses for the minor. Courses for the minor may not be taken pass/nonpass.

Students may create a focus for the minor by completing a specialization area; see "Optional Undergraduate Specializations and Track" above.

Certificate in Museum Studies

The Department of Anthropology administers the University's Museum Studies Program, which offers an undergraduate certificate; see Museum Studies in the Catalog.

Graduate Programs of Study

  • Master of Arts in anthropology
  • Doctor of Philosophy in anthropology

Graduate study in anthropology is open to individuals with varied undergraduate majors and training backgrounds. Students normally are admitted directly to the Ph.D. program; once they complete requirements for the M.A., their committees recommend whether or not they should continue to work toward the Ph.D.

Graduate students become competent in the discipline's four major subfields: sociocultural anthropology, linguistic anthropology, archaeology, and biological anthropology. Ph.D. students develop professional specialization for independent research and teaching in one of the subfields and may elect to pursue a concentration in feminist anthropology or paleoanthropology. Students also may choose to earn a terminal M.A. with a focus on cultural resource management—archaeology (CRM), which prepares them for a professional career in that field.

Master of Arts

The Master of Arts program in anthropology requires 30-36 s.h. of graduate credit, depending on the student's previous anthropological training. Students may count a maximum of 9 s.h. earned in courses outside anthropology toward the M.A. in anthropology. The degree normally is awarded to students after two years in the graduate program.

Master's degree students who choose to focus on cultural resource management—archaeology (CRM) normally do not go on to earn a Ph.D. in anthropology.

During the first semester of the M.A. program, students are advised by the director of graduate studies. By the end of the second semester, they must select an advisor and begin forming an M.A. committee. In consultation with the committee, the student develops a research project and writes an M.A. paper. The committee must approve the M.A. paper by the end of the fourth semester of study. The student also presents the paper publicly. As an alternative to the M.A. paper, students may choose to write a formal M.A. thesis, which must follow the Graduate College thesis guidelines. Students must submit a final copy of their M.A. thesis or paper to the department.

Master's degree students who intend to earn a doctorate should consider taking ANTH:5110 (113:210) Anthropological Data Analysis or another statistics course during their M.A. study.

GENERAL COURSE WORK

M.A. students must complete core seminars in at least three of four subfields (total of 9 s.h.). They choose core seminars from the following.

ANTH:5101 (113:240) Seminar Sociocultural Anthropology3 s.h.
ANTH:5201 (113:268) Seminar: Archaeological Theory and Method3 s.h.
ANTH:5301 (213:285) Seminar: Biological Anthropology3 s.h.
ANTH:5401 (113:271) Seminar: Linguistic Anthropology3 s.h.
ELECTIVES

In consultation with the advisor and committee members, each student selects additional course work to complete the remaining semester hours required for the M.A. Elective work may include courses in other disciplines, directed study, or up to 6 s.h. of M.A. thesis credit for students who choose the thesis option.

Doctor of Philosophy

The Doctor of Philosophy program in anthropology requires a minimum of 72 s.h. of graduate credit. The Ph.D. balances the general anthropological competence obtained at the M.A. level with professional specialization and competence for independent research and teaching in one of four subfields: sociocultural anthropology, linguistic anthropology, archaeology, and biological anthropology.

Ph.D. students also may elect to pursue a concentration in feminist anthropology or paleoanthropology; see "Graduate Concentrations" below.

REQUIRED COURSE WORK

Students may count a maximum of 18 s.h. earned in non-anthropology courses toward the 72 s.h. required for the Ph.D., including the maximum of 9 s.h. that may be counted toward the master's degree. They may count a maximum of 9 s.h. of independent study courses beyond the master's degree toward the Ph.D.

All doctoral students are required to take ANTH:5110 (113:210) Anthropological Data Analysis or another statistics course within the first three years of graduate study, preferably during the M.A. program (first two years).

Students must take at least one theory course beyond the course they took to fulfill the master's degree requirements in their specialization subfield. This course should be chosen from one of the following lists.

Sociocultural Anthropology

ANTH:5101 (113:240) Seminar Sociocultural Anthropology3 s.h.
ANTH:6107 (113:250) Seminar: Ritual and Performance3 s.h.
ANTH:6117 (113:251) Seminar: Resistance in Theory and Practice3 s.h.
ANTH:6410 (113:244) Seminar: Semiotics3 s.h.

Most graduate seminars offered in the feminist anthropology concentration also may be used to fulfill this requirement (see "Feminist Anthropology Concentration" below).

Linguistic Anthropology

ANTH:5401 (113:271) Seminar: Linguistic Anthropology3 s.h.
ANTH:6410 (113:244) Seminar: Semiotics3 s.h.
ANTH:6415 (113:273) Seminar: Language, Gender, and Sexuality3 s.h.

Archaeology

ANTH:3206 (113:174) Seminar: Taphonomy3 s.h.
ANTH:4205 (113:164) Rise of Ancient Civilization3 s.h.
ANTH:5201 (113:268) Seminar: Archaeological Theory and Method3 s.h.
ANTH:6205 (113:178) Hunter-Gatherer Ethnoarchaeology3 s.h.
ANTH:6230 (113:258) Seminar: Zooarchaeology3 s.h.

Biological Anthropology

ANTH:3308 (213:165) Human Variation3 s.h.
ANTH:3310 (213:188) Primate Behavior and Ecology3 s.h.
ANTH:3322 (213:170) Primate Evolutionary Biology3 s.h.
ANTH:3325 (213:151) Human Evolutionary Genetics3 s.h.
ANTH:3330 (213:187) Human Evolution in Africa and Eurasia3 s.h.
ANTH:4315 (213:169) Human Evolutionary Anatomy3 s.h.
ANTH:5301 (213:285) Seminar: Biological Anthropology3 s.h.
ANTH:6505 (213:288) Seminar: Paleoanthropology3 s.h.
Ph.D. COMPREHENSIVE PROCESS

The comprehensive process consists of preparing and defending a research prospectus and writing comprehensive essays. According to individual needs and in consultation with his or her committee, each student selects the order of completing these two tasks. Successful completion of both tasks advances the student to Ph.D. candidacy.

To remain in good academic standing, students must complete the comprehensive process by the end of their third year in the program. Students who do not adhere to this timeline are placed on departmental probation.

Working closely with his or her committee, each student drafts a research prospectus for the program of dissertation research and defends that prospectus before the Ph.D. committee. The defense is open to students and faculty. A copy of the student's dissertation prospectus must be made available in the department office one week before the defense.

Each student must write two comprehensive essays, which must be of publishable quality. One essay must concern the student's geographical area of specialization; the other must deal with his or her primary topical area. In some fields (e.g., biological anthropology), a geographical area may not be relevant. The essays are responses to questions the committee prepares in consultation with the student.

Comprehensive essays should demonstrate analysis, evaluation, synthesis, and control of a body of information (knowledge and comprehension). They should critique a major problem or debate (application and analysis), and they should develop a position on an issue and provide an explanation or theoretical justification for the position (evaluation and synthesis).

Doctoral students who have completed the comprehensive examination process are encouraged to enroll in ANTH:7501 (113:382) Dissertation Writing Seminar to enhance timely progress on their dissertations.

DISSERTATION

All Ph.D. candidates are required to carry out original anthropological research. Students typically conduct dissertation research after defending their research prospectus and writing comprehensive essays. Dissertations usually are based on fieldwork. Some are based on data from archival collections, laboratory projects, collections, or other source materials.

Graduate Concentrations

In addition to their required course work in the four Ph.D. subfields, students may complete a concentration in feminist anthropology or paleoanthropology. Each concentration reflects broad issues bridging subfields in and outside of anthropology.

Completion of a concentration indicates substantial expertise. It is recognized as a department credential and may be added to a student's curriculum vitae.

FEMINIST ANTHROPOLOGY CONCENTRATION

The feminist anthropology concentration offers broad training in a growing specialization area that enhances and draws from other theoretical approaches in anthropology. Graduate students in anthropology and other disciplines may explore particular aspects of the field by taking feminist anthropology courses.

Course work in the concentration emphasizes feminist perspectives, theories, methods, and analytic techniques in anthropology. It improves students' academic job prospects in anthropology and other fields, especially women's studies and gender studies. It also helps students prepare for careers in applied or public anthropology.

Feminist anthropology students take 15 s.h. of course work in the concentration in addition to their regular core requirements. The 15 s.h. should be divided between graduate seminars and elective courses as noted below.

Concentration courses may fulfill requirements for graduate electives in anthropology.

The following list of approved courses is subject to change; contact the Department of Anthropology for updates. Students may petition to count other courses in anthropology or other disciplines toward the concentration, if the courses or the students' work in them includes significant relevant content. Petitions are reviewed by the feminist anthropology faculty.

Graduate Seminars

Students complete at least two of these (minimum of 6 s.h.) and may count additional graduate seminar courses as elective credit.

ANTH:5120 (113:222) Reading Transnational Feminist Theory3 s.h.
ANTH:6125 (113:221) Seminar: Feminist Ethnography3 s.h.
ANTH:6310 (113:290) Anthropology of Science, Technology, and Gender3 s.h.
ANTH:6415 (113:273) Seminar: Language, Gender, and Sexuality3 s.h.

Electives

Students must earn a minimum of 9 s.h. in electives and may count extra credit earned in graduate seminars toward the elective requirement.

ANTH:2108 (113:107) Gendering India3 s.h.
ANTH:3118 (113:140) Politics of Reproduction3 s.h.
ANTH:3119 (113:154) Anthropology of Sexual Minorities3 s.h.
ANTH:3140 (113:141) Feminist Anthropology3 s.h.
ANTH:3141 (113:182) Women, Health, and Healing3 s.h.
ANTH:3300 (113:105) Mothers and Motherhood3 s.h.
ANTH:4140 (113:133) The Anthropology of Women's Health3 s.h.
PALEOANTHROPOLOGY CONCENTRATION

The paleoanthropology concentration offers broad training that combines archaeology and biological anthropology, two traditional subfields of anthropology important in understanding the biocultural factors that have been critical in human evolution. The concentration combines course work in both biological and archaeological anthropology, complementing the specialized training that students from either subfield receive in their own specialization. Paleoanthropology courses emphasize integration of biological and cultural factors in the evolution of hominid species up to and including modern humans. They encompass primate and human evolutionary anatomy, technology and subsistence in Paleolithic archaeology, and modern human hunter-gatherers.

Paleoanthropology students take 15 s.h. of course work in the concentration in addition to their regular core requirements. The 15 s.h. should be divided between graduate seminars and elective courses as noted below.

Students may choose core seminars to fulfill requirements for both the M.A. general course work and the paleoanthropology concentration.

The following list of approved courses is subject to change; contact the Department of Anthropology for updates. Students may petition to count other courses in anthropology or other disciplines toward the concentration, if the courses or the students' work in them includes significant relevant content. Petitions are reviewed by the paleoanthropology faculty.

Graduate Seminars

All of these (9 s.h.):

ANTH:5201 (113:268) Seminar: Archaeological Theory and Method3 s.h.
ANTH:5301 (213:285) Seminar: Biological Anthropology3 s.h.
ANTH:6505 (213:288) Seminar: Paleoanthropology3 s.h.

Electives

At least two of these (6 s.h. minimum):

ANTH:3260 (113:179) Pleistocene Peopling of the Americas3 s.h.
ANTH:3305 (213:190) Human Osteology3 s.h.
ANTH:3322 (213:170) Primate Evolutionary Biology3 s.h.
ANTH:3325 (213:151) Human Evolutionary Genetics3 s.h.
ANTH:3330 (213:187) Human Evolution in Africa and Eurasia3 s.h.
ANTH:4315 (213:169) Human Evolutionary Anatomy3 s.h.
ANTH:6205 (113:178) Hunter-Gatherer Ethnoarchaeology3 s.h.
ANTH:6230 (113:258) Seminar: Zooarchaeology3 s.h.

Admission

Applicants for admission to the graduate program in anthropology are considered regardless of their undergraduate major or previous field of training. Students without previous training in anthropology may be expected to perform additional work necessary to achieve competence expected for their degree objective.

Students normally are admitted directly to the Ph.D. program. Students without an M.A. in anthropology devote the first two years of the Ph.D. program to fulfilling the M.A. requirements. After those requirements are completed, the student's committee recommends to the faculty whether the student should continue to work toward the Ph.D.

Students with an M.A. in anthropology from another institution may proceed directly into a Ph.D. program organized around their special research interests.

Applicants for admission to the graduate program must meet the admission requirements of the Graduate College; see the Manual of Rules and Regulations of the Graduate College or the Graduate College section of the Catalog.

Applicants must submit the following:

a completed University application form;

transcripts of all previous undergraduate and graduate work;

three letters of recommendation from individuals competent to judge the applicant's potential for graduate training;

Graduate Record Examination (GRE) scores;

at least one written example of previous work (for example, a term paper).

Applicants whose first or official language is not English and whose previous academic degrees were not earned at an English-language institution must submit scores on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or the International English Language Testing System (IELTS).

Applicants with an M.A. from another university must submit a copy of their master's thesis; applicants who earned an M.A. without thesis or whose thesis is not yet complete should submit written copies of three papers completed in graduate school.

Financial Support

Financial assistance, usually in the form of teaching and research assistantships, may be offered to doctoral and potential doctoral students in good standing for up to four years. Students making satisfactory and timely progress through the graduate program are in good standing. Eligibility for financial aid is reduced after two years in the M.A. program, after two years in the Ph.D. program, or after one year of postdoctoral fieldwork or research enrollment. The amount and types of aid depend on departmental needs.

Students are notified in writing of a provisional financial award before the semester or summer session for which the award has been granted. Although awards are made before the end of the previous semester, each award is contingent upon satisfactory completion of that semester's work by the awardee.

Archaeological Field Research

Under the direction of University archaeologists, students acquire skills in data recovery and interpretive techniques. Opportunities are available for students to participate in archaeological field research in France, the Netherlands, Portugal, Sicily, the U.S. Southwest, or at various sites in the U.S. Midwest. Occasional fieldwork in East and Southeast Asia is available to graduate students in the paleoanthropology research program.

Resources, Facilities

The department has access to the Iowa Archaeological Collections through the Office of the State Archaeologist and maintains its own archaeological collections (midwestern prehistoric and historical and comparative faunal material).

The department maintains a documented human osteology teaching collection amassed by the University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine and the Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, and it holds a substantial documented human osteology research collection originally from Stanford University's medical school that is maintained jointly with the Office of the State Archaeologist.

Individual faculty members maintain field laboratories and conduct research outside the United States, maintaining ties with research institutions in foreign countries, including the Laboratoire d'Ethnologie Préhistorique at Pincevent, France; the Centre de Recherches Archéologiques at Verberie, France; the National Museum of Ethnology, Japan; the Institute of Technology Bandung (ITB), Indonesia; the Gemeente Nijmegen, Bureau Archeologie, Nijmegen, the Netherlands; and the Deutsches Archäologisches Institut of Madrid, Spain.

The department also has well-equipped laboratories for the study of archaeology, biological anthropology, a state-of-the-art multimedia linguistic anthropology laboratory, and a GIS/quantitative analysis laboratory.

The University is a charter member of the Human Relations Area Files (HRAF), an extensively annotated set of source materials on the peoples of the world—their environments, behavioral patterns, social lives, and cultures. Through HRAF and other library resources, anthropology students have access to source materials on more than 400 different cultures.

The University's exchange programs for Iowa students provide opportunities and some scholarships for study abroad.

Faculty

Members of the anthropology faculty have studied and lived in Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, Europe, Mexico and Central America, Pacific Islands, South America, and the United States. Recent field research has been conducted in Belgium, Brazil, Cameroon, China, Czech Republic, Ecuador, Fiji, France, Greece, Honduras, India, Indonesia, Italy, Japan, Mexico, Myanmar (formerly Burma), Namibia, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Peru, Philippines, Portugal, Russia, the Gambia, the United States, and Vietnam.

Current faculty interests include patterns of political and economic development of emerging nations; the trade in Mexican folk art, material culture, human rights; indigenous movements; visual culture and indigenous media; gender and the cultural politics surrounding sobriety in native North America; lesbian and gay families in the United States; the cultural production of scientific knowledge about racial/ethnic infant mortality disparities in U.S. public health; power, memory, and social inequality in ancient Iberia; language and gender; expressive culture and performance in the Brazilian Amazon; language and social justice; colonial linguistics, cultural politics of language, religion, and ethnicity; spiritual tourism in India; community and conflict, ritualization, localized religion, and environmentalism in Japan; ethnic minorities in Japan; diasporas, love, and romantic relations, culture, and totalitarianism in North Korea; paleoanthropological investigations of Pleistocene karst caves in China and northern Vietnam; geological and paleoanthropological field surveys of the Plio-Pleistocene Sangiran Dome, in Java; Neanderthal craniofacial form, function, and evolutionary history; anatomical modernity and the origins of modern humans; historical archaeology of Iowa; primate evolutionary history; faunal and spatial analyses from Paleolithic sites in France, middle Stone Age adaptations in Namibia; regional interaction and migration in late-prehistoric North America; peopling of the Americas; human impacts on the environment in North America.

Courses

General Anthropology, Lower-Level Undergraduate

ANTH:1000 (113:029) First-year Seminar1 s.h.
Small discussion class taught by a faculty member; topics chosen by instructor; may include outside activities (e.g. films, lectures, performances, readings, visits to research facilities). Requirements: first‑ or second‑semester standing.
 
ANTH:1001 (113:050) Issues in Anthropology3 s.h.
In‑depth exploration of methodological and theoretical issues in contemporary anthropology; emphasis on critical reading of primary texts.
 
ANTH:1003 (113:062) Anthropology of Violence3 s.h.
Sources and manifestations of violence; violence in varied contexts—war, genocide, colonialism, state violence, terrorism, domestic violence; anthropological perspective considering structural, economic, and symbolic violence.
 
ANTH:1005 (113:064) The Evolution of Human Sex3 s.h.
How evolution has shaped our sexual behavior; patterns of mate choice, parental behavior, social organization, cooperation, and conflict as responses to selection pressure; sexual selection, reproductive strategies, mate choice, sex roles and practices.
 
ANTH:1006 (113:065) Anthropology, Science Fiction, and Fantasy3 s.h.
Connections between anthropology and science fiction and fantasy; science fiction and fantasy films and literature surveyed and examined in light of scholarly essays on anthropological concepts such as human evolution, race, gender, the anthropological other.
 
ANTH:1007 (113:066) The Anthropology of Virtual Worlds3 s.h.
How virtual reality intertwines with social existence; anthropological exploration of virtual worlds, from checking e‑mail to setting up bar crawls on Facebook; forms of virtual identity, how virtual life affects language.
 
ANTH:1008 (113:067) Anthropology of Immigration3 s.h.
Anthropological study of movements of people, goods, ideas around the world, drawing upon recent theory and ethnographic examples; topics include citizenship, family/parenting, gender, labor, economy, religion.
 
ANTH:1009 (113:068) Anthropology of Childhood: The Production of Human Beings in the Contemporary World3 s.h.
Examination of biological, social, historic, economic, and political aspects of childhood in the contemporary world from an anthropological perspective. Recommendations: introductory anthropology course.
 
ANTH:1040 (113:045) Language Rights3 s.h.
Language minorities and linguistic human rights in the United States and worldwide; language and identity, culture, power; case studies of language rights deprivation. GE: International and Global Issues. Same as LING:1040 (103:045).
 
ANTH:1046 (113:046) People and the Environment: Technology, Culture, and Social Justice3 s.h.
How resources, commodities, people, and ideas cross borders; examination of globalization through issues of technology, social justice, environment; perspectives from anthropology, gender studies, geography, energy science, and development. GE: International and Global Issues. Same as GWSS:1046 (131:046), GEOG:1046 (044:046).
 
ANTH:1061 (113:041) Origins of Life in the Universe (Part 2)4 s.h.
Fundamental questions (How old is the universe? What is the nature of life? How has life evolved on Earth? What are our human origins? Are there other habitable planets in the universe?) that revolve around understanding origins from different perspectives (i.e., astronomy, physics, geoscience, biology, chemistry, anthropology); work with faculty from several departments to investigate these questions; inquiry‑based activities to build success in critical thinking, teamwork, and effective written and oral communication; second of a two‑part sequence. Prerequisites: ASTR:1060 (029:040) or BIOL:1060 (002:050) or EES:1060 (012:045). Recommendations: first‑year or sophomore standing. GE: Natural Sciences with Lab. Same as ASTR:1061 (029:041), BIOL:1061 (002:051), EES:1061 (012:046).
 
ANTH:1101 (113:003) Cultural Anthropology3 s.h.
Comparative study of culture, social organization. GE: Social Sciences; Values, Society, and Diversity. Same as IS:1101 (187:008).
 
ANTH:1201 (113:012) Introduction to Prehistory3 s.h.
Data, theories of evolution of human cultures from end of Pleistocene to emergence of complex societies; emphasis on prehistoric cultural information from world areas from which relatively complete sequences are available. GE: Historical Perspectives.
 
ANTH:1301 (113:013) Human Origins3 s.h.
Processes, products of human evolution from perspectives of heredity and genetics, evolutionary theory, human biological characteristics, fossil record, artifactual evidence, biocultural behaviors. GE: Natural Sciences without Lab.
 
ANTH:1305 (113:060) Forensic Anthropology and CSI3 s.h.
Role and range of techniques used in forensic anthropology; how analysis of skeletal and nonskeletal remains is used in crime scene investigation; case studies.
 
ANTH:1310 (113:081) Human Genetics in the Twenty-First Century3 s.h.
Analysis of human genes and genomes; genetic basis of simple and complex traits; genetic aspects of cancer; paleogenomics and tracing human migrations with DNA. GE: Natural Sciences without Lab. Same as BIOL:1311 (002:081).
 
ANTH:1401 (113:014) Language, Culture, and Communication3 s.h.
Human language in context of animal communication; development, acquisition of language; biological base; language as a linguistic system in cultural social context. GE: Social Sciences.
 
ANTH:2009 (113:075) Individual Study1-3 s.h.
Readings in area or subdivision of anthropology in which student has had basic course work.
 
ANTH:2100 (113:010) Anthropology and Contemporary World Problems3 s.h.
Selected world problems from an anthropological perspective; current dilemmas and those faced by diverse human groups in recent times and distant past. GE: International and Global Issues; Social Sciences.
 
ANTH:2164 (113:091) Culture and Healing for Future Health Professionals3 s.h.
Health professions increasingly focused on how to best provide health care to culturally diverse populations; introduction to key cultural and social influences on sickness and healing; worldwide examples. Same as GHS:2164 (152:091).
 
ANTH:2320 (213:090) Anthropological Perspectives on Human Infectious Disease: Origins and Evolution3 s.h.
Origin and evolution of important infectious diseases in human history; biological evolution of infectious agents and biocultural responses to emerging infectious diseases; primary focus on viruses and bacteria; selected world problems from an anthropological perspective; current dilemmas and those faced by diverse human groups in recent times and distant past. Same as GHS:2320 (152:090).
 

General Anthropology, Upper-Level Undergraduate and Graduate

ANTH:3001 (113:103) Introduction to Museum Studies3 s.h.
Overview of museum history, function, philosophy, collection, and curatorial practices; governance and funding issues; exhibition evaluation and audience studies; examples from Museum of Art, Museum of Natural History, Old Capitol Museum, and Medical Museum. GE: Social Sciences. Same as EDTL:3001 (07S:112), SIED:3001 (097:115), MUSM:3001 (024:102).
 
ANTH:3005 (113:148) Special Topics in Anthropology2-3 s.h.
Problems, concepts involved in comparing and contrasting behavior and ideas of different cultures.
 
ANTH:3010 (113:149) Special Topics in Anthropology2-3 s.h.
Problems, concepts involved in comparing and contrasting behavior and ideas of different cultures.
 
ANTH:3123 (113:120) Economic Anthropology3 s.h.
Overview of classic and contemporary research in subfield of economic anthropology; historical approach to key debates in economic anthropology; contemporary ethnographic examples. Prerequisites: ANTH:1101 (113:003).
 
ANTH:3221 (113:190) Beyond the Map: Introduction to Geographic Information Systems (GIS) in Anthropology3 s.h.
Software environment for managing, visualizing, and analyzing spatial relationships in anthropology; mapmaking tool; spatial organization of material culture.
 

General Anthropology, Graduate

ANTH:5001 (113:235) Graduate Teaching Pro-Seminar1 s.h.
Graduate student teaching skills: developing course guidelines, leading discussion, grading, review sessions, dealing with problem students and complaints; development of syllabi and teaching portfolios; mentoring of less‑experienced teaching assistants.
 
ANTH:5005 (113:236) Responsible Conduct of Research in Anthropology1 s.h.
Up‑to‑date documents in all subfields of anthropology regarding ethical research; CITI certification (which also qualifies as part of IRB application); key debates and current problems faced by anthropology in area of ethical and responsible research.
 
ANTH:5110 (113:210) Anthropological Data Analysis3 s.h.
Quantitative procedures for analyzing field data, library materials; elementary statistics, introduction to computers.
 
ANTH:7109 (113:209) Research Design and Proposal Writing3 s.h.
Anthropological research design; preparation of proposals for fieldwork or laboratory analysis.
 
ANTH:7501 (113:382) Dissertation Writing Seminar2 s.h.
Organization of dissertation, setting and meeting deadlines, writing a chapter, and workshopping drafts; seminar group work and consultation with advisors; completion and revision of at least one dissertation chapter; for anthropology graduate students who are beginning, or about to begin, their dissertation writing process. Requirements: anthropology graduate student who passed comprehensive exams (prospectus and essays).
 

Area Studies, Lower-Level Undergraduate

ANTH:2108 (113:107) Gendering India3 s.h.
Aspects of Indian culture, including nation, family, sexuality, work, and religion, through the lens of gender; Hindu India, differences in region, caste, and class. Same as GWSS:2108 (131:107).
 
ANTH:2110 (113:131) Latin American Economy and Society3 s.h.
Development, present structure of Latin American economy and society; emphasis on rural regions in context of national development; focus on area as a whole. GE: International and Global Issues.
 
ANTH:2165 (113:110) Native Peoples of North America3 s.h.
History, culture of American Indian peoples; emphasis on North America. GE: Values, Society, and Diversity. Same as AINS:2165 (149:110), AMST:2165 (045:105).
 
ANTH:2175 (113:125) Japanese Society and Culture3 s.h.
Cultural anthropology of Japan, including historical tradition, religious ethos, social organization, human ecology, educational and political institutions; emphasis on how these aspects relate to and influence one another. GE: Values, Society, and Diversity. Same as JPNS:2175 (39J:125).
 
ANTH:2182 (113:092) African Peoples and Cultures3 s.h.
How African people have navigated a changing world in their everyday lives, from slave trade in West Africa to HIV/AIDS epidemic in Southern Africa; focus on precolonial, colonial, and postcolonial Africa with emphasis on how particular groups of people have adapted to changing social, political, and economic influences; historical overview of recent and current peoples and cultures in Africa.
 
ANTH:2183 (113:093) Asia and Globalization: Anthropological Approach3 s.h.
Asia as a melting pot of diverse cultures, where flow of goods, ideas, and humans is very intense; ethnographic studies on diverse cultures in Asia.
 

Area Studies, Upper-Level Undergraduate and Graduate

ANTH:3108 (113:118) North Korea and Totalitarianism3 s.h.
North Korea viewed as a human society, rather than a global security threat, through examination of the nation's culture and politics.
 
ANTH:3111 (113:119) Health in Mexico3 s.h.
Use of anthropological perspectives to examine disease, healing systems, and ideas about health and the body in Mexico and its diaspora; relationships between structural conditions and historical and political transformations; ideas about gender and race; chronic and acute disease in Mexico; conquest and disease; racialized bodies; sexual health; biomedicine; shamanism; immigration and health; pollution and narcoviolence; readings in English. Same as GHS:3040 (152:119).
 
ANTH:3121 (113:127) Love and Kinship in South Asia3 s.h.
Anthropological understandings of love in India and the region of South Asia more broadly; emphasis on contemporary society; filial and motherly love, arranged marriage and romantic love, devotional and artistic expressions, love between siblings. Prerequisites: ANTH:1101 (113:003) or ANTH:2100 (113:010) or GWSS:1001 (131:010) or GWSS:1002 (131:055). Same as GWSS:3121 (131:127).
 
ANTH:3142 (113:128) American Cultures3 s.h.
How anthropology has understood the diversity of non‑indigenous cultures in the United States; history of anthropological engagement with the United States; racial/ethnic formations, immigration, class variations, health, sexuality, and gender. Prerequisites: ANTH:1101 (113:003).
 
ANTH:4700 (113:132) Latin American Studies Seminar3 s.h.
Interdisciplinary approach. Taught in English. Recommendations: Spanish or Portuguese sufficient for background readings. Same as SPAN:4900 (035:176), PORT:4700 (038:176), LAS:4700 (130:176), HIST:4504 (16W:109), CL:4700 (218:153).
 

Sociocultural Anthropology, Lower-Level Undergraduate

ANTH:2101 (113:137) The Anthropology of Love3 s.h.
The culturally diverse concept and practice of love as seen through cross‑cultural and interdisciplinary texts on romantic and other forms of love.
 
ANTH:2102 (113:108) Anthropology of Marriage and Family3 s.h.
Classic anthropological theories of kinship and marriage, including topics such as cousin marriage and incest; recent work on new reproductive technologies and transnational marriage. Same as GWSS:2102 (131:108).
 
ANTH:2136 (113:116) Urban Anthropology3 s.h.
Cross‑cultural approach to urban anthropology; urbanizing processes, migration and adaptation, aspects of class and ethnicity in urban settings, urban economic relations. GE: International and Global Issues; Social Sciences.
 
ANTH:2150 (113:115) Transnational Feminism3 s.h.
Introduction to feminist perspectives from U.S. and non‑U.S. contexts; how geopolitics shapes understanding of familiar feminist issues (e.g., reproduction, cultural practices, sexualities, poverty); emphasis on global south regions. Same as GWSS:2150 (131:149).
 
ANTH:2181 (113:147) The Anthropology of Aging3 s.h.
Comparative anthropological perspective on aging; ethnographies from diverse contexts used to examine intersections of kinship, religion, health, and medicine in later life. Same as ASP:2181 (153:181), GHS:2181 (152:147).
 

Sociocultural Anthropology, Upper-Level Undergraduate and Graduate

ANTH:3101 (113:112) Anthropology of Sexuality3 s.h.
Practice, definition, and regulation of sex in different cultures and times; use of anthropological tools, including cross‑cultural comparison and social constructionist analysis; how social and historical forces shape sex; how a range of topics relate to sexuality, including science, love, work, globalization, ethnicity, health, aging, pornography, and deviance; focus on ways that dynamics (i.e., class, race, gender norms) shape people's culturally‑ and historically‑specific ways of having and thinking about sex. Same as GWSS:3101 (131:112).
 
ANTH:3102 (113:185) Medical Anthropology3 s.h.
Major theoretical, methodological approaches; international health and development; biomedicine as a cultural system; ethnomedicine; anthropology and AIDS, human reproduction, epidemiology, ethnopsychiatry. Prerequisites: ANTH:1101 (113:003) or ANTH:2100 (113:010). Same as GHS:3102 (152:185), CBH:5125 (172:173).
 
ANTH:3103 (113:143) Environment and Culture3 s.h.
Individual and group responses to scarcities of natural resources such as land, water, food. Requirements: ANTH:1101 (113:003) or ANTH:2100 (113:010) or graduate standing.
 
ANTH:3107 (113:109) Literature and Anthropology3 s.h.
Topics vary. Same as ENGL:3107 (008:151), CL:3107 (218:151).
 
ANTH:3109 (113:135) Psychological Anthropology3 s.h.
Cultural diversity in constructions of self, mind, and emotion; religious experience, altered states of consciousness, behavioral disorders. Prerequisites: ANTH:1101 (113:003).
 
ANTH:3110 (113:121) Health of Indigenous Peoples3 s.h.
Health problems and services for indigenous populations worldwide, from perspective of Fourth World postcolonial politics. Prerequisites: ANTH:1101 (113:003). Same as AINS:3110 (149:121), GHS:3110 (152:121).
 
ANTH:3112 (113:114) Environmentalisms3 s.h.
Alternative ways of conceptualizing the environment drawn from the ethnographic record worldwide; culturally constructed images of nature and their expression through daily activity and communicative media; inspiration for environmental activism; why such movements emerge, techniques they employ, factors that contribute to their success or failure. Prerequisites: ANTH:1101 (113:003).
 
ANTH:3113 (113:145) Religion and Healing3 s.h.
Historical evidence of religious healing in Christian, Hindu, Buddhist, Native American, and Shaman traditions. Same as RELS:3580 (032:180), GHS:3113 (152:145).
 
ANTH:3114 (113:142) Anthropology of Religion3 s.h.
Approaches; religious roles; shamanism, witchcraft, curing; mythology; place of religion in social and cultural change. Same as RELS:3714 (032:165).
 
ANTH:3116 (113:156) Fictionalized Ethnography in Literature and Film3 s.h.
Evaluation of fictional narratives as sources of ethnographic information, instructive and revealing depictions of other societies and cultures; culturally specific themes through storylines, creative works as cultural artifacts in presentations of differing perspectives and concerns from the authors' personal experiences.
 
ANTH:3117 (113:136) Using Ethnographic Methods3 s.h.
Ethnography, holistic, qualitative research in cultural context for anthropological and related research and careers involving interpersonal interaction; multiple ethnographic methods and their rationales. Recommendations: desire to interact with others, and prior course work in fields that employ ethnographic or qualitative research (social sciences, social work, nursing, public health).
 
ANTH:3118 (113:140) Politics of Reproduction3 s.h.
Debates over women's reproductive experience, including its medicalization. Same as GWSS:3118 (131:144).
 
ANTH:3119 (113:154) Anthropology of Sexual Minorities3 s.h.
Ethnographic studies of sexual minorities and anthropological approaches to lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgendered persons and communities; behavior, identity, performativity, kinship, globalization, the HIV/AIDS pandemic. Requirements: junior, senior, or graduate standing. Same as GWSS:3119 (131:154).
 
ANTH:3127 (113:146) Anthropology of Death3 s.h.
How anthropologists and archaeologists study death, dying, mortuary rituals, and notions of the afterlife in contemporary North America and in different places and times. Requirements: ANTH:1101 (113:003) or ANTH:1201 (113:012) or graduate standing.
 
ANTH:3130 (113:104) Cultural Politics3 s.h.
Cultural politics involved in cultural representation; varied forms of cultural performance and display; social and power relationships between producers, consumers, represented subjects. Prerequisites: ANTH:1101 (113:003) or ANTH:2100 (113:010).
 
ANTH:3131 (113:117) Anthropology and Human Rights3 s.h.
Complex history and evolving relationship of anthropology and international human rights discourses; concept deployment of culture and rights in human rights ideas, practice, discourse, and as a form of global law. Prerequisites: ANTH:1101 (113:003) or ANTH:1201 (113:012) or ANTH:1301 (113:013) or ANTH:1401 (113:014).
 
ANTH:3133 (113:122) Anthropology of Race3 s.h.
Anthropological perspectives on race: history of race in anthropology; social, cultural, and political dimensions of race; intersections with gender; biology of human diversity. Recommendations: introductory course in social sciences.
 
ANTH:3135 (113:155) Key Debates in Sociocultural Anthropology3 s.h.
Historical overview of sociocultural anthropological theories, exploration of key moments of critical reflections, and e‑assessment of discipline; highly recommended for anthropology majors with sociocultural emphasis. Prerequisites: ANTH:1101 (113:003) or ANTH:2100 (113:010). Recommendations: anthropology major.
 
ANTH:3140 (113:141) Feminist Anthropology3 s.h.
Development and evolution of feminist critiques in cultural anthropology; readings from early studies by women ethnographers, classic writings that sought to give women cross‑cultural visibility, recent experimental texts. Same as GWSS:3140 (131:141).
 
ANTH:3141 (113:182) Women, Health, and Healing3 s.h.
Women's experience as recipients and providers of health care; intersection of race, class, cultural variation, and women's health; reproductive and nonreproductive health concerns. Same as GWSS:3141 (131:143).
 
ANTH:3151 (113:151) The Anthropology of the Beginnings and Ends of Life3 s.h.
Examination of diverse understandings of birth and death, drawing on anthropological analysis of personhood, kinship, ritual, and medicine; how social inequality and new technologies shape human experience at life's margins. Prerequisites: ANTH:1101 (113:003) or ANTH:2100 (113:010). Same as ASP:3151 (153:151), GHS:3151 (152:156).
 
ANTH:3152 (113:152) Anthropology of Caregiving and Health3 s.h.
Diverse understandings and practices of care around the world; focus on relationships between caregiving practices and health across the life course. Same as ASP:3152 (153:152), GHS:3152 (152:149).
 
ANTH:3300 (113:105) Mothers and Motherhood3 s.h.
Treatment of motherhood; role of motherhood and devaluation of social status. Same as GWSS:3300 (131:142).
 
ANTH:4130 (113:139) Religion and Environmental Ethics3 s.h.
How humans conceptualize the biophysical environment through religious beliefs and practices; how images of the environment influence people's activities, how they are used by grassroots environmental movements. Requirements: junior or senior standing. Same as RELS:4730 (032:130).
 
ANTH:4140 (113:133) The Anthropology of Women's Health3 s.h.
How female gender intersects with culture, environment, and political economy to shape health and illness; reproductive health, violence, drug use, cancer; readings in anthropology, public health. Prerequisites: ANTH:1101 (113:003). Same as CBH:5140 (172:133), GWSS:4140 (131:133).
 

Sociocultural Anthropology, Graduate

ANTH:5101 (113:240) Seminar Sociocultural Anthropology3 s.h.
Social institutions in the world's societies; problems in theory, method, interpretation. Requirements: graduate standing or undergraduate anthropology honors standing.
 
ANTH:5120 (113:222) Reading Transnational Feminist Theory3 s.h.
Issues in transnational feminist scholarship, including colonialism, globalization, the nation‑state, religion, cultural traditions, and human rights, in global and U.S. domestic contexts; interdisciplinary readings with focus on anthropology, other social sciences. Same as GWSS:5120 (131:222).
 
ANTH:5130 (113:242) Food, Culture, and Social Theory3 s.h.
Comparative and ethnographic approach to study of food and eating; intersections between social roles and meanings of food, political economies of food, and impact of food on bodies and well‑being.
 
ANTH:6107 (113:250) Seminar: Ritual and Performance3 s.h.
Approaches to comparative study of ritual in religious and secular contexts.
 
ANTH:6115 (113:202) Ethnographic Field Methods3 s.h.
Basic data‑gathering techniques for field research in sociocultural anthropology. Same as CBH:6115 (172:202).
 
ANTH:6117 (113:251) Seminar: Resistance in Theory and Practice3 s.h.
Various forms of political resistance, some bold and dramatic (peasant rebellions), others more subtle and mundane (dissimulation, false compliance, pilfering); some resistance is symbolic (millenarian movements, rituals of conflict, status reversal); learning to recognize and attend to more subtle forms.
 
ANTH:6125 (113:221) Seminar: Feminist Ethnography3 s.h.
Feminist critiques of traditional ethnographies; informed by contemporary feminisms. Same as GWSS:6125 (131:245).
 
ANTH:6141 (113:274) Medical Anthropology and Social Theory3 s.h.
How medical anthropology has both responded and contributed to key theoretical developments in recent decades, such as discourse/narrative analysis, practice theory, feminist theory, postcolonial theory, science and technology studies.
 
ANTH:6310 (113:290) Anthropology of Science, Technology, and Gender3 s.h.
Science and technology done in particular social and structural contexts; theoretical approaches for understanding cultures of science and social uses of technology; focus on gender‑related aspects of real world cases. Recommendations: graduate standing in any discipline with interest in understanding cultural context of scientific practice. Same as GWSS:6310 (131:290).
 
ANTH:6632 (113:248) Crossing Borders Proseminararr.
Same as HIST:6632 (016:244), POLI:6632 (030:243), GEOG:6632 (044:287), GRMN:6632 (013:260), SPAN:6903 (035:271), CINE:6632 (048:244).
 
ANTH:6635 (113:247) Crossing Borders Seminar2-3 s.h.
Same as HIST:6635 (016:247), ENGL:6635 (008:231), POLI:6635 (030:242), GEOG:6635 (044:286), AFAM:6635 (129:231), GRMN:6635 (013:262), SPAN:6904 (035:273), PORO:6635 (160:247), IWP:6635 (181:247), FREN:6142 (009:262), CINE:6635 (048:247), COMM:6635 (036:247).
 

Archaeology, Lower-Level Undergraduate

ANTH:2205 (113:168) Archaeological Methods3 s.h.
Current theoretical approaches, methods used to investigate the past; site formation processes, taphonomy, sampling and research design, typology and seriation, subsistence‑settlement reconstruction, cultural evolution. Prerequisites: ANTH:1201 (113:012).
 
ANTH:2216 (113:157) Foodways and Cuisine in the Past3 s.h.
Anthropological and archaeological perspective on cuisine; present‑day links between food and culture; past cuisines viewed through written documents and archaeological data; histories of different foods.
 
ANTH:2220 (113:163) Archaeology of Mesoamerica3 s.h.
Archaeological data related to the evolution of civilization in Mesoamerica; sequence from hunter‑gatherers to A.D. 1519; emphasis on Central Mexico, Maya area, Oaxaca.
 
ANTH:2261 (113:113) Human Impacts on the Environment3 s.h.
Long‑term patterns of human‑environment interactions surveyed through archaeological case studies; varied scales of human impacts, including animal extinction, habitat destruction, agricultural practices, urban growth, state‑level societies. GE: International and Global Issues; Social Sciences.
 
ANTH:2290 (113:162) Practicum in Archaeologyarr.
Intensive, hands‑on examination of a wide range of materials recently recovered from archaeological sites; pottery, lithics (stone tools and related items), plant remains, animal bones; for students with strong archaeological interests or archaeological field experience.
 

Archaeology, Upper-Level Undergraduate and Graduate

ANTH:3205 (113:161) Prehistoric People of the Ice Age3 s.h.
Hominid occupation of Old World during Pleistocene; hominid fossils, artifacts, settlement patterns, climatic reconstruction, evolutionary processes; survey and evaluation. Prerequisites: ANTH:1201 (113:012) and ANTH:2205 (113:168).
 
ANTH:3206 (113:174) Seminar: Taphonomy3 s.h.
Taphonomy (study of fossil record in paleontology and archaeology); processes for accumulation, modification, and deposition of remains in prehistory; instruction by archaeologist and paleontologist. Requirements: graduate standing. Same as EES:3206 (012:174).
 
ANTH:3207 (113:158) Animal Bones in Archaeology3 s.h.
Use of faunal material in interpretation of archaeological remains, including skeletal anatomy, identification, taphonomy, determination of age and sex, seasonality, quantification, sampling, breakage and cutmarks, interpretations; laboratory sessions. Prerequisites: ANTH:1201 (113:012).
 
ANTH:3235 (113:197) The Stuff of Lives: Archaeology of the Material World3 s.h.
Ways that archaeologists and anthropologists have approached their studies of the material world and the relationship between material culture and economics, social structure, and symbolism. Prerequisites: ANTH:1101 (113:003) or ANTH:1201 (113:012).
 
ANTH:3237 (113:124) Politics of the Archaeological Past3 s.h.
How control over management of material remains of the ancient past, and representations of that past, intersect with the identity of diverse groups, including archaeologists, indigenous peoples, national governments, collectors, ethnic minorities and majorities, museum curators; struggles for control of the archaeological past at different scales (artifacts, skeletal remains, sites, imagery, narratives) and in different regions of the world. Same as MUSM:3237 (024:124).
 
ANTH:3238 (113:130) Archaeology of the Iberian Peninsula3 s.h.
Introduction to archaeology of the Iberian Peninsula, from earliest human occupation through period of Romanization.
 
ANTH:3239 (113:150) Tribes and Chiefdoms of Ancient Europe3 s.h.
Archaeology of European societies between the Mesolithic and Iron Age; how ideas about Europe's prehistoric past have been used for political purposes. Requirements: ANTH:1201 (113:012) or graduate standing.
 
ANTH:3240 (113:170) Cultural Resources Management Archaeology: Practice and Practicalities3 s.h.
Cultural Resources Management (CRM) archaeology as the largest sector of archaeological research in the United States in terms of employment, funding, and field‑ and lab‑related activity; investigate the past, navigate the complexities of compliance requirements from federal, state, and local regulations concerning historic preservation; introduction to the legal, procedural, and practical foundations of CRM archaeology; prepare students for employment by acquisition of skills from project planning through dissemination of results. Prerequisites: ANTH:1201 (113:012). Recommendations: completion of other anthropology, geography, history, or Native American studies courses.
 
ANTH:3241 (113:169) Lithic Analysis in Archaeology3 s.h.
Archaeological issues examined and addressed with lithic data; use of lithic data to study the past, specific techniques applied. Requirements: ANTH:1201 (113:012) or graduate standing.
 
ANTH:3242 (113:188) Archaeology of the Middle East—Prehistory and Early History3 s.h.
Overview of prehistoric and early historic archaeology of the Middle East; questions that underpin archaeological narrative for the region from its initial peopling through city‑states and imperial formations. Recommendations: introduction to archaeology.
 
ANTH:3243 (113:195) Midwestern Archaeology3 s.h.
Comparison of cultural adaptations utilizing regional archaeological data to develop an understanding of Midwestern lifeways through time; how prehistoric peoples relate to their modern descendants in the Midwest. Recommendations: introduction to prehistory.
 
ANTH:3255 (113:160) Introduction to Archaeological Ceramics3 s.h.
Basic analytical techniques for archaeological ceramics, applied primarily to ceramics from midwestern and western North America; raw materials, manufacture, decoration and style, craft specialization, use, and discard. Prerequisites: ANTH:1201 (113:012).
 
ANTH:3256 (113:173) Household Archaeology and Anthropology3 s.h.
Structure and activities of households today and in the past; what households tell us about the larger culture; how intangible aspects of households are studied through material remains. Prerequisites: ANTH:1101 (113:003) or ANTH:1201 (113:012) or ANTH:1301 (113:013) or ANTH:1401 (113:014) or ANTH:2100 (113:010).
 
ANTH:3257 (113:167) North American Archaeology3 s.h.
Prehistoric cultural development north of Mexico from initial occupation to European contact and conquest; emphasis on dynamics of culture change. Same as AINS:3257 (149:167).
 
ANTH:3258 (113:159) Southwestern Archaeology3 s.h.
Anthropological overview of prehistoric cultures of the American Southwest; emphasis on understanding archaeological arguments concerning major processes in the past. Same as AINS:3258 (149:159).
 
ANTH:3260 (113:179) Pleistocene Peopling of the Americas3 s.h.
Major themes in earliest human settlement of the Americas, including human mobility, subsistence, technology, human impacts on the environment.
 
ANTH:3261 (113:111) Our Life With Dogs: The Anthropological Study of Animals in Human Societies3 s.h.
Intricate connections between dogs and our social, economic, political, and spiritual lives; human relationships with dogs that extend back at least 16,000 years; process of dog domestication; roles dogs play in human ideology and past economies; modern interactions with dogs.
 
ANTH:3265 (113:181) Archaeology of the Great Plains3 s.h.
Contrasting lifeways, diets, and technologies that humans used to survive on North America's Great Plains, from Ice Age hunter‑gatherers to Euroamerican homesteaders.
 
ANTH:3275 (113:196) The Archaeology of Ancient Egypt3 s.h.
Introduction to the archaeology of ancient Egypt from predynastic times to Roman Egypt, including monumental architecture; patterns of everyday life; social, economic, and demographic considerations; history of archaeology in Egypt. Same as CLSA:3596 (20E:196).
 
ANTH:3276 (113:192) Greek Archaeology and Ethnohistory3 s.h.
Archaeology and ethnology of the Greek world, from end of Bronze Age to late Roman Empire; sociocultural processes that influence development and persistence of Greek civilization. Same as CLSA:3235 (20E:118).
 
ANTH:3277 (113:194) Roman Archaeology3 s.h.
Archaeology and ethnology of Roman civilization from Iron Age eighth‑century occupation of the Palatine Hill to the end of the Roman empire in the West, A.D. 476. Prerequisites: ANTH:1201 (113:012) or ANTH:1301 (113:013). Same as CLSA:3240 (20E:119).
 
ANTH:3282 (113:126) Animals, Culture, and Food3 s.h.
The varied roles animals have played in human society through time; impact of humans on animal populations, ethical aspects of animals' roles in modern societies.
 
ANTH:3283 (113:187) Cultures in Collision3 s.h.
Survey of archaeological evidence for differences in human interactions between two or more cultural groups; issues such as ethnicity, war, economy, repression, multiethnic communities.
 
ANTH:3290 (113:193) Special Topics in Archaeology3 s.h.
 
ANTH:3295 (113:199) Field Research in Archaeologyarr.
Beginning skills in site surveying and excavation, lab work, record keeping at nearby prehistoric sites.
 
ANTH:4205 (113:164) Rise of Ancient Civilization3 s.h.
Cultural evolution in Old World, New World; emphasis on developments from pre‑agricultural societies to appearance of urban civilizations; focus on Mesoamerica, Central Andes, Near East, Egypt, Indus Valley, China.
 
ANTH:4620 (113:189) Approaches to Geoarchaeology3 s.h.
Geoarchaeology as multidisciplinary contextual framework for human paleoecology; natural processes that create the archaeological record, approaches to reconstructing landscapes of the past as a context for archaeological deposits; weekend field trip. Prerequisites: EES:3360 (012:136) or EES:4720 (012:172) or ANTH:3205 (113:161) or ANTH:4205 (113:164). Same as EES:4620 (012:185).
 

Archaeology, Graduate

ANTH:5201 (113:268) Seminar: Archaeological Theory and Method3 s.h.
Development, current status of theory, method in Americanist archaeology. Requirements: graduate standing or undergraduate anthropology honors standing.
 
ANTH:6205 (113:178) Hunter-Gatherer Ethnoarchaeology3 s.h.
Variability in adaptations of hunter‑gatherers on a global scale; emphasis on subsistence, mobility, social organization; archaeological record of prehistoric hunter‑gatherers interpreted through study of modern societies. Requirements: graduate standing.
 
ANTH:6230 (113:258) Seminar: Zooarchaeology3 s.h.
Interpretation of faunal material in archaeology; intensive survey of classic and recent literature on taphonomy, skeletal anatomy, population parameters, seasonality, quantification and sampling, butchering patterns, ethnoarchaeology, social and economic inferences. Prerequisites: ANTH:3207 (113:158).
 

Biological Anthropology, Lower-Level Undergraduate

ANTH:2390 (213:195) Laboratory Methods in Biological Anthropologyarr.
Specimen preparation, cataloging, moulding and casting, photography, computer analyses, library research.
 

Biological Anthropology, Upper-Level Undergraduate and Graduate

ANTH:3305 (213:190) Human Osteology3 s.h.
The human skeletal system; normal and pathologic variation; skeletal measurement and analysis with application to paleoanthropology, forensic, and archaeological investigations.
 
ANTH:3306 (213:115) The Neanderthal Enigma3 s.h.
Survey of Neanderthals as the most widely known, yet enigmatic, fossil human lineage; history of discoveries; current interpretations of Neanderthal's origins, anatomy and behavior, relationship to today's people, extinction.
 
ANTH:3307 (213:116) Modern Human Origins3 s.h.
Current data and theories regarding the emergence of Homo sapiens; how human anatomical modernity is defined and recognized in the fossil record; competing models for modern humans' emergence—multiregional evolution, out of Africa, the assimilation model; interpretation of recent developments and discoveries in the human fossil record; contemporary contributions from genetics, developmental biology, evolutionary ecology, paleodemography.
 
ANTH:3308 (213:165) Human Variation3 s.h.
Range and patterning of biological diversity in contemporary human populations; past and present attempts to organize and explain human genetic, morphological variation in light of recent data, theory.
 
ANTH:3310 (213:188) Primate Behavior and Ecology3 s.h.
Systematics, anatomy, behavior, and ecology of living non‑human primates; emphasis on adaptations and interactions of free‑ranging primates as related to ecological constraints and conservation strategies.
 
ANTH:3322 (213:170) Primate Evolutionary Biology3 s.h.
Principles of evolution, systematics, and biogeography; application to origin and diversification of primate order; emphasis on fossil evidence and biomolecular studies for phylogenetic interpretations.
 
ANTH:3325 (213:151) Human Evolutionary Genetics3 s.h.
Application of molecular methods and theory to biological anthropology; how recent advances in genetics have provided insight into the evolution of human and nonhuman primates. Prerequisites: ANTH:1301 (113:013).
 
ANTH:3326 (213:153) Infectious Disease and Human Evolution3 s.h.
Infectious disease as a central and important role in evolution of modern humans; impact of important infectious diseases on human history through primary literature. Recommendations: evolutionary theory background or interest. Same as GHS:3326 (152:157).
 
ANTH:3327 (213:154) Genes, Culture, and Human Diversity3 s.h.
New perspectives in evolutionary theory on the origin of human biology and cultural diversity; principles borrowed from evolutionary thinking that provide insight into how cultures change, basis of human institutions, and gene‑culture coevolution.
 
ANTH:3328 (213:155) Molecular Genetics of Human Disease3 s.h.
Disease as an unfortunate, but unavoidable, aspect of human condition; genetic nature of disease that reveals origins of inherited disease; variation of disease across the globe. Recommendations: biology or genetics course to provide substantial background knowledge.
 
ANTH:3330 (213:187) Human Evolution in Africa and Eurasia3 s.h.
Examination of human evolutionary past from early fossil apes to origin and diversification of hominin family and appearance of modern humans; emphasis on human evolution in Africa and dispersal through Eurasia.
 
ANTH:4315 (213:169) Human Evolutionary Anatomy3 s.h.
Interpretation of skeletal remains as the basis for reconstructing forms, adaptations, lifestyles of prehistoric humans; body size, musculature, stance, activity patterns, brain size, and sexual dimorphism. Prerequisites: ANTH:3305 (213:190).
 

Biological Anthropology, Graduate

ANTH:5301 (213:285) Seminar: Biological Anthropology3 s.h.
Physical anthropology, including heredity and genetics, evolutionary theory, human biological characteristics, primate and human fossil record, primate behavior and ecology, human adaptations. Requirements: graduate standing or undergraduate anthropology honors standing.
 
ANTH:6505 (213:288) Seminar: Paleoanthropology3 s.h.
Current understandings of biocultural processes and events underlying Pleistocene human evolution; cross‑disciplinary approach combining human paleontology and Paleolithic archaeology. Requirements: graduate standing or undergraduate honors standing or advanced undergraduate standing.
 

Linguistic Anthropology, Upper-Level Undergraduate and Graduate

ANTH:3415 (113:171) Multi-Media Ethnography3 s.h.
Skills and tools for using multimedia technologies in ethnographic research and presentations; students conduct research projects using audio and video recording equipment and develop media‑based presentations; ethnographic emphasis on contextually situated social interaction. Prerequisites: ANTH:1101 (113:003) or ANTH:2100 (113:010).
 

Linguistic Anthropology, Graduate

ANTH:5401 (113:271) Seminar: Linguistic Anthropology3 s.h.
Fundamental concepts and methods employed in the anthropological study of language; principal areas of current research. Requirements: graduate standing or undergraduate anthropology honors standing.
 
ANTH:6410 (113:244) Seminar: Semiotics3 s.h.
Piercian semiotic and Saussurean semiological conceptual frameworks; focus on anthropological, linguistic issues.
 
ANTH:6415 (113:273) Seminar: Language, Gender, and Sexuality3 s.h.
Role of language and discourse in cultural constructions of gender identities and relations, including domination and subordination; theoretical perspective and methodological approaches that have shaped thought on the language/gender nexus. Same as GWSS:6415 (131:273), LING:6415 (103:221).
 

Individual Reading and Research, Upper-Level Undergraduate and Graduate

ANTH:3015 (113:183) Independent Studyarr.
 
ANTH:4995 (113:186) Honors Research Seminar2-4 s.h.
Preparation for writing honors thesis, including project conception and research, proposal writing, oral and written presentations of student research. Corequisites: ANTH:4996 (113:176) if not taken as a prerequisite. Requirements: honors standing in anthropology.
 
ANTH:4996 (113:176) Honors Research2-4 s.h.
Project chosen in consultation with honors advisor.
 

Individual Reading and Research, Graduate

ANTH:6005 (113:383) Independent Study: Anthropologyarr.
 
ANTH:6010 (113:384) Research: Anthropologyarr.
 
ANTH:6015 (113:385) Thesisarr.