Search

This is a draft edition of the 2014-15 Catalog; the final edition will be published in late summer 2014.

American Studies

Chair

  • Horace Porter

Faculty

Professors

  • Susan Birrell (American Studies/Gender, Women's, and Sexuality Studies), Kim Marra (American Studies/Theatre Arts), Horace A. Porter (F. Wendell Miller Professor; English/American Studies), Lauren Rabinovitz (American Studies/Cinematic Arts)

Associate professors

  • Lafayette Adams (English/American Studies), Catriona Parratt, Laura Rigal (English/American Studies), Deborah Whaley (American Studies/African American Studies), Nicholas Yablon

Assistant professors

  • Thomas Oates (American Studies/Journalism and Mass Communication), Travis Vogan (Journalism and Mass Communication/American Studies)

Lecturer

  • Nikolas Dickerson

Professors emeriti

  • Richard P. Horwitz, John Raeburn
Undergraduate majors: American studies (B.A.); sport studies (B.A.)
Undergraduate minors: American studies; sport studies
Graduate degrees: M.A. in American studies; Ph.D. in American Studies (optional sport studies subtrack)
Web site: http://clas.uiowa.edu/american-studies/

The Department of American Studies provides an interdisciplinary introduction to American culture, past and present. It helps students acquire a broad familiarity with the dynamics of cultural experience and explore aspects of life in the United States, such as sport, popular and fine arts, institutions, values, gender and ethnic relations, artifacts, and the everyday life of a diverse citizenry.

The department offers undergraduate programs of study in American studies and in sport studies as well as graduate programs of study in American studies, with a sport studies subtrack available in the Ph.D.

The department also is the administrative home of the American Indian and Native Studies Program, which offers an undergraduate certificate and minor and a graduate certificate; see American Indian and Native Studies in the Catalog.

Undergraduate Programs of Study

  • Major in American studies (Bachelor of Arts)
  • Major in sport studies (Bachelor of Arts)
  • Minor in American studies
  • Minor in sport studies

Bachelor of Arts: American Studies

The Bachelor of Arts with a major in American Studies requires a minimum of 120 s.h., including 36 s.h. of work for the major. Students must earn at least 24 s.h. for the major at The University of Iowa. All students must complete the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences General Education Program.

The major in American studies stresses broad training in cultural analysis and communication. Although it offers no explicit vocational training, the program provides preparation for careers in business, education, government, journalism, or social service; for advanced study in the humanities, the social sciences, theology, or business; or for professional study in law or medicine. American studies students may arrange internships through the University's Pomerantz Career Center.

A distinctive feature of the American studies major is the opportunity to develop broad training in cultural analysis as well as emphasis of particular interests within the study of American culture. With the help of their American studies advisors, students may elect to pursue one of five focus areas within American studies, or they may create an individual plan of study. Each focus area allows students to group courses in American studies and other departments around a specific interdisciplinary theme, topic, or set of social issues; see "American Studies Focus Areas" below.

Shortly after declaring the major, a student should meet with his or her faculty advisor to explore the range of course work available and to begin shaping an individual plan of study. By the student's second term in the major, the student and advisor should have agreed upon a plan of study and focus area for completing the requirements for the major.

The major in American Studies usually requires the following 12 courses.

AMST:1010 (045:001) Understanding American Cultures3 s.h.
AMST:2000 (045:020) Approaches to American Studies3 s.h.
AMST:2025 (045:025) Diversity and American Identities3 s.h.
AMST:3090 (045:090) Seminar in American Cultural Studies3 s.h.
Two additional American studies courses numbered 3000 or above6 s.h.
Two additional American studies core courses (any level)6 s.h.
Special interest focus area: four courses in American studies and/or other departments12 s.h.

American Studies Focus Areas

Students should consult regularly with the Department of American Studies about courses offered by American studies and other departments that count toward each focus area. A maximum of two courses from a single department outside American studies may be counted toward a single focus area.

ETHNIC STUDIES, DIVERSITY, AND DIFFERENCES

Students choose this focus to develop interdisciplinary understanding of an individual ethnic and/or racial group (e.g., Latino/a studies, Jewish-American studies) or to examine broadly gender, race, sexuality, social class, region, national origins, and age in the United States. Emphasis is on the historic emergence of categories of social difference, especially as revealed in cultural practices and artifacts, geography and cityscapes, leisure, and popular expression.

AMERICAN ARTS, LITERATURE, AND POPULAR CULTURE

Students who choose this focus examine artistic creations to discover how they are shaped by cultural preconceptions, norms, and standards, and how in turn these expressive forms affect ongoing developments in cultural life. Emphasis is on skills in the formal analysis of artistic artifacts, historical inquiry, and cultural contextualization.

AMERICAN SOCIETY, POLITICS, AND EVERYDAY LIFE

Students who choose this focus consider the dynamics of social change, the emergence and fate of political movements, and the forms and practice of everyday life in America. The area encompasses the tradition of revolution in America, the effects of technological and economic change, and the roles of the family, workplace, and community from the colonial era to the digital age.

THE POLITICS OF NATURE: ENVIRONMENT, SUSTAINABILITY, AND LANDSCAPE

Students who choose this focus explore how Americans from pre-Columbian times to the present have shaped and regarded the natural environment. Topics might include the perception of wilderness in early America; the relationship of Native American peoples to the land; the impact of industrialization and urban growth on the environment; the emergence of a cult of nature; the treatment and representation of animals; the mass production, distribution, and consumption of food; and the growing movement for sustainability in agriculture, architecture, urban planning, and individual lifestyles.

SPORT AND POPULAR AMUSEMENT

Students who choose this focus examine the various sports, recreational activities, and popular amusements enjoyed in the United States from colonial and early America to the present. They examine the relationship between work and play, the role of technology and the media, the commercialization of sport, and the politics of gender, race, class, sexuality, and disability.

INDIVIDUALLY DESIGNED FOCUS AREAS

Individually designed focus areas may concentrate on an interdisciplinary topic, theme, group of people, or time period. Students who wish to design their own interdisciplinary focus area should consult with their American studies advisor for appropriate courses.

Bachelor of Arts: Sport Studies

The Bachelor of Arts with a major in sport studies requires a minimum of 120 s.h., including 45 s.h. of work for the major (30 s.h. in sport studies and 15 s.h. in an outside specialization area or a minor). At least 24 s.h. of credit for the major must be earned at The University of Iowa. Students also must complete the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences General Education Program.

The sports studies major examines sport in its historical and contemporary cultural contexts. Course work provides students with the critical skills necessary to understand the cultural significance of sport as it relates to the media, the economy, the political system, and the educational system. A focus on the race, class, and gender differences in the sport experience is central to the major.

Many students use their experience in the program to prepare for graduate school. For others, the required second concentration area or minor serves as an introduction to careers in a number of fields, such as sport journalism, sport management, or coaching.

The major in sport studies requires the following course work.

SPORT STUDIES FOUNDATION

Students should complete the foundation courses as early as possible.

Both of these:

AMST:1010 (045:001) Understanding American Cultures3 s.h.
SPST:1074 (028:074) Inequality in American Sport3 s.h.
SPORT STUDIES CORE

Students must complete one course from each of the following four content areas (total of 12 s.h.).

Diversity in sport—one of these:

SPST:2078 (028:078) Women, Sport, and Culture3 s.h.
SPST:2079 (028:079) Race and Ethnicity in Sport3 s.h.

International dimensions—one of these:

SPST:3176 (028:176) Sport and Nationalism3 s.h.
SPST:3177 (028:177) Sport in the Western World3 s.h.

Contemporary sport in America—one of these:

SPST:3175 (028:175) Sport and the Media3 s.h.
SPST:3179 (028:188) American Sport Since 19003 s.h.

History of sport and leisure in America—one of these:

SPST:3174 (028:179) The American Vacation3 s.h.
SPST:3178 (028:178) American Sport to 19003 s.h.
ELECTIVES

Students must complete at least 12 s.h. of approved elective courses; the department suggests courses from the following list. Students also may include courses from the sport studies core (above) that they have not already taken.

AMST:1065 (045:065) Disney in America3 s.h.
AMST:2000 (045:020) Approaches to American Studies3 s.h.
AMST:2052 (045:052) Fairs and Amusement Parks3 s.h.
CLSA:1875 (20E:075) Ancient Sports and Leisure3 s.h.
ECON:3690 (06E:165) Sports Economics3 s.h.
ENTR:4450 (06T:151) Professional Sports Management3 s.h.
HHP:2150 (027:035) Stress Management3 s.h.
HHP:2500 (027:076) Psychological Aspects of Sport and Physical Activity3 s.h.
JMC:1200 (019:091) Media History and Culture3 s.h.
JMC:3125 (019:154) Media and Consumers3 s.h.
JMC:3160 (019:164) Images and Society3 s.h.
SOC:2810 (034:066) Social Inequality3 s.h.
SPST:2081 (028:180) Theory and Ethics of Coaching3 s.h.
SPST:2084 (028:084)/AMST:2084 (045:084) Sport and Film3 s.h.
SPST:3171 (028:171) Baseball in America3 s.h.
SPST:3193 (028:193) Independent Studyarr.
SPST:4900 (028:198) Topics in Sport Studies1-3 s.h.
SPST:4999 (028:194) Honors Project1-3 s.h.
OUTSIDE CONCENTRATION AREA OR MINOR

All sport studies students must complete 15 s.h. of course work in an allied field of concentration outside the major (e.g., American studies; journalism and mass communication; business; gender, women's, and sexuality studies). Work for the concentration must include 6 s.h. earned in courses numbered 3000 or above or in courses that are designated advanced by the department or program that offers them. Concentration area courses may not be taken pass/nonpass.

Students select their allied field of concentration in consultation with their advisor, and they must have their advisor's written approval for the area.

Students also may satisfy the concentration requirement by earning a second major or a minor in another discipline. Students who satisfy the requirement in this way are held responsible for ensuring that they have fulfilled the requirements for the second major or the minor.

B.A. with Coaching Authorization or Endorsement

Students may prepare for coaching by completing additional course work that also qualifies them for a coaching authorization from the State of Iowa. The following courses are recommended.

ATEP:2030 (027:057) Basic Athletic Training3 s.h.
HHP:1100 (027:053) Human Anatomy3 s.h.
HHP:3300 (027:117) Human Growth and Motor Development3 s.h.
SPST:2081 (028:180) Theory and Ethics of Coaching3 s.h.

Students who successfully complete the requirements for the coaching authorization must submit an application to the Iowa Board of Educational Examiners. For more information, visit Coaching Authorization FAQs on the board's web site.

Four-Year Graduation Plan

The following checkpoints list the minimum requirements students must complete by certain semesters in order to stay on the University's Four-Year Graduation Plan. (Courses in the major are those required to complete the major; they may be offered by departments other than the major department.)

B.A.: American Studies

Before the fifth semester begins: declaration of the major and discussion of a plan of study with an American studies advisor

Before the seventh semester begins: at least six courses from the plan of study and at least 90 s.h. earned toward the degree

Before the eighth semester begins: at least nine courses from the plan of study

During the eighth semester: enrollment in all remaining course work in the major, all remaining General Education courses, and a sufficient number of semester hours to graduate

B.A.: Sport Studies

Before the fifth semester begins: declaration of the major

Before the sixth semester begins: area of specialization determined

Before the seventh semester begins: at least six sport studies courses and at least 90 s.h. earned toward the degree

Before the eighth semester begins: at least eight sport studies courses

During the eighth semester: enrollment in all remaining course work in the major, all remaining General Education courses, and a sufficient number of semester hours to graduate

Honors in the Major

Students majoring in American studies or sport studies have the opportunity to graduate with honors in the major and to pursue special interests through individual, in-depth research.

Honors students carry out a research project. Working under the guidance of an undergraduate advisor, each student defines a research project and then makes a project proposal, ideally by the end of the junior year. The student completes the project under the guidance of a supervising faculty member. American studies honors students register for up to 6 s.h. in AMST:4999 (045:095) Honors Project. Sport studies honors students register for up to 3 s.h. in SPST:4999 (028:194) Honors Project.

Contact the American studies honors advisor for more information about honors in either major.

Honors students in either major must be members of the University's honors program, which requires students to maintain a cumulative University of Iowa g.p.a. of at least 3.33 and to fulfill other requirements; visit Honors at Iowa to learn about the University of Iowa Honors Program.

Minor: American Studies

The minor in American studies requires a minimum of 15 s.h. in American studies courses, including 12 s.h. in courses considered advanced for the minor taken at The University of Iowa (courses numbered above AMST:1010 (045:001) are considered advanced for the minor). Students must maintain a g.p.a. of at least 2.00 in all courses for the minor and in all UI courses for the minor. Course work in the minor may not be taken pass/nonpass. Students interested in earning the American studies minor should consult with one of the department's faculty members.

Minor: Sport Studies

The minor in sport studies requires a minimum of 15 s.h. in University of Iowa sport studies courses (prefix SPST), including at least 6 s.h. in courses numbered 3000 or above. Students must maintain a g.p.a. of at least 2.00 in all courses for the minor and in all UI courses for the minor. Course work in the minor may not be taken pass/nonpass. Students select courses for the minor according to their interests and the recommendation of the undergraduate coordinator.

Certificate in American Indian and Native Studies

The Department of American Studies administers the American Indian and Native Studies Program, which offers a certificate for undergraduate and graduate students and a minor for undergraduates; see American Indian and Native Studies in the Catalog.

Graduate Programs of Study

  • Master of Arts in American studies (with or without thesis)
  • Doctor of Philosophy in American studies (optional sport studies subtrack)

Applicants must meet the admission requirements of the Graduate College; see the Manual of Rules and Regulations of the Graduate College or the Graduate College section of the Catalog.

Master of Arts

The Master of Arts program in American studies requires a minimum of 36 s.h. of graduate credit. The degree generally is offered without thesis; students must petition the director of graduate studies for permission to pursue the thesis option.

Each M.A. student designs an interdisciplinary field of concentration in consultation with his or her American studies advisor.

The M.A. in American studies requires the following work.

AMST:5000 (045:200) Theory and Practice of American Studies I3 s.h.
AMST:5001 (045:201) Theory and Practice in American Studies II3 s.h.
Two graduate seminars in American studies6 s.h.
Five courses in the interdisciplinary field of concentration15 s.h.
Electives9 s.h.
M.A. portfolio

Each student must complete an M.A. portfolio, which includes a research paper, faculty evaluations for all courses taken during the student's first full year of graduate study, and a self-evaluation essay.

The research paper is a graduate seminar paper that demonstrates the student's skills as a research scholar and writer and represents his or her strongest work. The paper should be 25-30 pages, including a bibliography.

The self-evaluation essay summarizes the American studies methods and materials that have shaped the student's interdisciplinary work in the field and states how the master's degree work in American studies has contributed to, challenged, or complicated the student's goals and ambitions beyond the degree.

Students assemble the M.A. portfolio under the guidance of their advisors and should submit it no later than December 1 of their third semester in residency. The portfolio is evaluated on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory (S/U) basis by a three-person American studies faculty committee. Students whose portfolio receives a U may resubmit the portfolio during their fourth semester of residency.

For students who wish to continue their education with doctoral study, the M.A. portfolio serves as the application for admission to the Ph.D. program in American studies. The department informs applicants whether they have been accepted into the Ph.D. program by the end of the fall semester in which they submit their M.A. portfolio; admission is contingent upon successful completion of the M.A. during the student's fourth semester of residency.

Doctor of Philosophy

The Doctor of Philosophy program in American studies requires a minimum of 72 s.h. of graduate credit. Students may focus in American studies or choose the sport studies subtrack.

Each student works with his or her faculty advisor to map out a coherent plan of study that reflects the student's particular interests. Students are permitted considerable flexibility in constructing their study plan, but they must meet certain basic requirements, which include foundation courses, area foundation courses, two interdisciplinary fields of concentration, a research skills course, elective course work, and a dissertation.

The two fields of concentration may be defined to correspond with the student's strongest intellectual interests, but they must be interdisciplinary in concept and multidisciplinary in scope. Each must include course work from more than one of the University's departments and programs. The two concentration areas may, and usually should, have an intellectual relationship with each other.

Students are expected to address the cultural diversity of American life in their course work and reading.

The Doctor of Philosophy requires the following work. Some course requirements are different for American studies and sports studies.

COURSE WORK
Required Foundation Courses

All students complete the required foundation courses and should take them as early as possible.

AMST:5000 (045:200) Theory and Practice of American Studies I3 s.h.
AMST:5001 (045:201) Theory and Practice in American Studies II3 s.h.
Area Foundation Courses

American studies students:

Two American studies graduate seminars6 s.h.

Sport studies students:

SPST:5002 (028:202) Critical Theories for Sport3 s.h.
SPST:6074 (028:374) Seminar in Sport History3 s.h.
First Field of Concentration

American studies students:

Courses in an interdisciplinary field with a historical concentration, designed with the advisor and approved by the department's Plan of Study Committee18 s.h.

Sport studies students:

Courses on sport in cultural and historical contexts selected with the advisor and approved by the department's Plan of Study Committee18 s.h.
Second Field of Concentration

American studies students:

Courses in an interdisciplinary field designed with the advisor and approved by the department's Plan of Study Committee18 s.h.

Sport studies students:

Courses in an interdisciplinary field designed with the advisor and approved by the department's Plan of Study Committee; may be a second field in sport studies or a field outside sport studies18 s.h.
Research Skills

American studies students:

AMST:7085 (045:550) Dissertation Writing Workshop (taken three times)3 s.h.

Sport studies students:

SPST:7070 (028:295) Sport Studies Workshop (may be repeated)1 s.h.
Additional Requirements

American studies and sport studies students:

Dissertation work (AMST:7090 (045:600) Ph.D. Thesis) and electives21 s.h.
ADMISSION TO PH.D. CANDIDACY

Admission to Ph.D. candidacy signifies that the department judges the doctoral student qualified to take the comprehensive examination. Doctoral students advance to Ph.D. candidacy based on a review conducted during their second year in the Ph.D. program (typically during fall semester); the review assesses the student’s readiness to complete his or her studies through the comprehensive examination and the dissertation, which is an original work of scholarship. In addition to judging the student's readiness for Ph.D. candidacy, the review provides a progress report on the student's work and a tentative prognosis for future prospects in the field.

COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION

The comprehensive examination comprises three written exams and one oral exam.

The first exam is taken under the supervision of an American studies faculty member, who also chairs the comprehensive examination. The candidate takes a timed, take-home written exam of no less than four hours and no longer than two days; the exam details the candidate’s approach to American studies (methods and models), including his or her position and critical engagement with models of American studies scholarship.

The remaining two written exams explore the candidate's major fields; these are at least four hours long and may be given on a take-home basis at the examiner's discretion.

The oral exam covers material from the written exams.

DISSERTATION

The final requirement for the Ph.D. in American studies is the dissertation, a substantive book-length manuscript that involves interdisciplinary research and analysis and that represents an original contribution to knowledge. All Ph.D. dissertations must be approved by a committee of five faculty members, including at least two from the Department of American Studies.

Internships

Qualified graduate students in American studies can arrange internships with a number of local agencies, including the State Historical Society of Iowa, the Division of Historic Preservation, the University of Iowa Museum of Art, the Iowa Humanities Board, Brucemore, the Herbert Hoover Presidential Library and Museum, and the Putnam Museum. With special permission, candidates conducting research during such on-the-job training may receive academic credit through AMST:7994 (045:320) Independent Study. Other internships with social agencies, government, or business also may be arranged.

Courses

American Studies, Lower-Level Undergraduate

AMST:1010 (045:001) Understanding American Cultures3 s.h.
The United States in historical, contemporary, and transnational perspective; social and cultural diversity and conflict in American life; debates on concepts of America, the American Dream, national culture, citizenship. GE: Values, Society, and Diversity.
 
AMST:1030 (045:030) Introduction to African American Culture3 s.h.
Interdisciplinary look at Black culture in the United States through significant contributions of the humanities (music, art, literature, drama, philosophy) to development of Black culture. GE: Values, Society, and Diversity. Same as AFAM:1020 (129:061).
 
AMST:1049 (045:049) Introduction to American Indian and Native Studies3 s.h.
Themes and methodologies in the study of American Indians and other indigenous peoples; approaches from anthropology, history, law, literature, other disciplines. Offered fall semesters. GE: Values, Society, and Diversity. Same as AINS:1049 (149:049).
 
AMST:1050 (045:005) American Issues3 s.h.
Representative issues: radio and American culture; cultural history of the Civil War era; American history, literature, culture.
 
AMST:1060 (045:060) Sex and Popular Culture in the Postwar U.S.3 s.h.
Critical and historical introduction to representation of human sexuality in American popular culture from World War II to the present. GE: Values, Society, and Diversity. Same as GWSS:1060 (131:061), ENGL:1410 (008:003).
 
AMST:1065 (045:065) Disney in America3 s.h.
How Walt Disney Corporation has influenced American cultural values, ideals, and experiences through its evolution from an animation company in the 1920s, to a theme park company and television producer in the 1950s, to a media conglomerate today; the corporation's national importance, Hollywood's contributions to the Depression and World War II, postwar urban and community planning, America's changing leisure behavior, advertising and childhood, modern business history, and exportation of American culture. Same as CINE:1632 (048:062).
 
AMST:1074 (045:074) Inequality in American Sport3 s.h.
Cultural meanings of sport in contemporary U.S. culture; American dream as promoted, challenged in sport; sport experiences, inclusion, and exclusion as affected by gender and sexuality, race and ethnicity, social class, age, physical ability/disability, and nationalism. GE: Values, Society, and Diversity. Same as SPST:1074 (028:074), GWSS:1074 (131:074).
 
AMST:1075 (045:075) American Popular Music3 s.h.
 
AMST:1080 (045:080) American Political Humor3 s.h.
How political humor reflects and influences American attitudes regarding government institutions, elected officials, the democratic process; how humor works; examples from Revolutionary War present and from varied media, including cartoons, fiction, film, television, the Internet.
 
AMST:1154 (045:050) Food in America3 s.h.
Cultural significance of production, distribution, and consumption of food in the United States. GE: Values, Society, and Diversity.
 
AMST:2000 (045:020) Approaches to American Studies3 s.h.
Variety of historic and contemporary sources, such as literature, law, photography, painting, film, TV, music, fashions, environments, events of everyday life. Prerequisites: AMST:1010 (045:001).
 
AMST:2025 (045:025) Diversity and American Identities3 s.h.
History and variety of American identities, examined through citizenship, culture, social stratification; conflict and commonalities among groups according to race, ethnicity, gender, class, sexuality; how art, literature, music, film, photography, and other cultural artifacts represent diversity of identities.
 
AMST:2052 (045:052) Fairs and Amusement Parks3 s.h.
Nineteenth‑ and twentieth‑century international expositions, amusement parks, and theme parks as cultural events of U.S. self‑definition.
 
AMST:2084 (045:084) Sport and Film3 s.h.
Sport films as means of exploring contemporary ideas about sport in the U.S.; focus on narrative structure, characterization, historical, and political contexts; formal aspects of film analysis (e.g., editing, lighting, cinematography). Same as SPST:2084 (028:084).
 
AMST:2085 (045:085) Native American Material Culture3 s.h.
Overview of American collectors and collections of Indian objects, prehistoric to contemporary. Same as AINS:2085 (149:085).
 
AMST:2165 (045:105) Native Peoples of North America3 s.h.
History, culture of American Indian peoples; emphasis on North America. GE: Values, Society, and Diversity. Same as ANTH:2165 (113:110), AINS:2165 (149:110).
 
AMST:2500 (045:053) U.S. Cinema and Culture3 s.h.
Representation of race, ethnicity, class, gender, and sexuality in Hollywood movies. Same as CINE:2654 (048:054).
 

American Studies, Upper-Level Undergraduate and Graduate

AMST:3039 (045:139) Reading the West3 s.h.
How race, gender, and class shape cross‑cultural encounter and imperial expansion on regional frontiers; how frontiers are represented in literature, art, and film.
 
AMST:3045 (045:145) Immigration and American Culture3 s.h.
Immigrants and immigrant communities.
 
AMST:3047 (045:147) American Disasters3 s.h.
Fault lines of American society and culture as exposed during catastrophe; history of American disaster investigated through methods from cultural history, visual theory, sociology, and media studies; varied disasters 1800 to present, including those involving cities (Chicago fire, San Francisco earthquake, Chicago heat wave), transportation (Titanic, Challenger, Columbia), and environment (Union Carbide and Bhopal, Exxon Valdez); causes of catastrophes; how Americans react and are drawn to catastrophe (e.g., disaster films, jokes); related topics, including technology, urbanism, race, class, apocalyptic religion, journalism, popular culture.
 
AMST:3050 (045:150) Topics in American Cultural Studies3 s.h.
Special topics in American history, literature, culture.
 
AMST:3051 (045:151) American Business Cultures3 s.h.
Historical and contemporary records of business and corporate experiences as part of American life and thought, including representations of business in American novels, movies, history, autobiography; emphasis on questions of relationships between gender, ethnicity, class, and sexuality and corporate identities.
 
AMST:3053 (045:153) The Civil Rights Movement3 s.h.
History of the American civil rights movement. Same as AFAM:3053 (129:153).
 
AMST:3060 (045:160) American Cityscapes3 s.h.
Changing conventions in representation of American cities between the 1830s and 1930s; fiction and nonfiction, visual and audiovisual culture.
 
AMST:3063 (045:163) American Ruins3 s.h.
Emergence and development of American fascination with ruins, from indigenous to urban‑industrial remains; actual ruins and depiction of imagined ruins in art, literature, cinema.
 
AMST:3065 (045:165) The Culture of Nature3 s.h.
How ideas of "the natural" and "the cultural" underpin beliefs, laws, and social practices; relationship between these two concepts; construction of notions of a natural world; idea of landscape and nature as a resource to be used, appreciated, articulated, or enjoyed; focus on analysis of relationships to animals.
 
AMST:3067 (045:167) Reading and Writing the History of the Environment3 s.h.
Culture and society bind human communities to the natural world that supports them; local landforms and waterways in Iowa have shapen, and been shaped by, human uses and meanings; the past inheres in present‑day struggles over land and water use, see local landscapes historically; deploy skills of environmental history to understand the historical and cultural roots of present‑day conflicts over land use and appreciate how beliefs, rituals, recreational practices, and technologies attach human beings to places in which they live.
 
AMST:3090 (045:090) Seminar in American Cultural Studies3 s.h.
Interdisciplinary perspectives on a single theme or period. Prerequisites: AMST:1010 (045:001).
 
AMST:3130 (045:126) Black American Cinema3 s.h.
Major historical and cultural movements in Black cinema; independent and early Hollywood films, animation, Blaxploitation, the Black Renaissance, Black auteurs (e.g., Spike Lee, Julie Dash), hip‑hop cinema, womanist films, 21st‑century developments in film (e.g., theatre to film adaptions of Tyler Perry), new media's effect on film and cinema; particular attention given to gender, sexualities, region, ethnicity, and class. Same as AFAM:3130 (129:126).
 
AMST:3135 (045:135) The Social Construction of Whiteness3 s.h.
Whiteness as a socially constructed racial category with material effects in everyday life; race as a category with salience in determining public policy, forming identities, and shaping people's actions; interdisciplinary approach using social history, philosophy, science, law, literature, autobiography, film, and the expressive arts.
 
AMST:3148 (045:148) American Monuments3 s.h.
How Americans enshrine certain memories in form of public monuments; why Americans began building large‑scale monuments in 19th century (Bunker Hill, Washington Monument); subsequent monuments to wars, Indian massacres, the Confederacy, the civil rights movements; recent trends, including counter‑monuments (9/11 memorial), spontaneous and temporary monuments, and online memorials; roles monuments play in American society, why they attract so much controversy, how some become sites for popular protests or for depositing artifacts, and how they compare with those in other countries (Holocaust memorials in Germany).
 
AMST:3162 (045:162) Production and Consumption of Alcohol and Drugs in the United States from Pre-Columbian to Present3 s.h.
History of alcohol and other drugs in the United States from pre‑Columbian times to present; production and distribution of alcohol and drugs; efforts by the state to regulate or prohibit them; rise of temperance movement; social history of alcohol and drug consumption within various (sub)cultures and periods; role in constructing racial, ethnic, class, gender, and sexual identities; exploration of these themes in novels, film, songs, and other cultural texts.
 
AMST:3171 (045:171) Baseball in America3 s.h.
Forces that influenced political, economic, and social development of professional baseball in the United States; rise of major league baseball, its relationship to the minor leagues, and development of organized baseball industry. Same as SPST:3171 (028:171).
 
AMST:3174 (045:174) The American Vacation3 s.h.
Development of the Idea of vacation from upper‑class origins to acceptance as part of middle‑ and working‑class life; Niagara Falls, Saratoga Springs, the Catskills, Atlantic City, Idlewild, Coney Island, national parks of the American West, Chicago World's Fair, Gettysburg, Disneyland; how vacation experiences and meanings are shaped by social class, race, gender, age; growth of leisure time, labor legislation, proper use of leisure time, tourism, vacations as social rituals, golden age of family vacations. Same as SPST:3174 (028:179).
 
AMST:3178 (045:178) American Sport to 19003 s.h.
Growth and institutionalization of sport from colonial times to 1900. Same as SPST:3178 (028:178).
 
AMST:3179 (045:188) American Sport Since 19003 s.h.
Historic development of sport in the United States since 1900; economic forces, professionalization, growth of media. Same as SPST:3179 (028:188).
 
AMST:3195 (045:195) American Cultures and American Photography3 s.h.
Introduction to visual, cultural, and historical frameworks to view and interpret photographs as material artifacts.
 
AMST:3198 (045:187) New Media and the Future of Sport3 s.h.
Emergence and significance of Internet blogs, social media, convergence journalism, video games, and fantasy sports; economic, regulatory, and cultural forces that shape new media sport journalism and entertainment. Same as SPST:3198 (028:187), JMC:3135 (019:143).
 
AMST:3400 (045:102) Black Popular Music3 s.h.
History and expressive culture of people of African descent living in America through popular music forms; historical time span between the 17th and 21st centuries; poetry, music, cultural analysis, film, and art as sources for the study of Black music; genres covered include spirituals and gospel, blues, jazz, rock, rhythm and blues, Afropunk, alternative and neo soul, and hip‑hop. Recommendations: AFAM:1020 (129:061) and AMST:1030 (045:030). Same as AFAM:3400 (129:102).
 
AMST:3480 (045:123) American Literature and History3 s.h.
Examination of fictional histories (novels about history), their relationship to historical interpretation. English majors may apply this course to the following area and/or period requirement. AREA: American Literature and Culture. PERIOD: 18th/19th‑Century Literature, or 20th/21st‑Century Literature. Same as ENGL:3480 (008:123).
 
AMST:3994 (045:100) Independent Studyarr.
 
AMST:4283 (045:173) U.S. Women's History as the History of Human Rights3-4 s.h.
History of human rights in the United States traced through the perspective of women; aspects of women's experience (social, political, intellectual) related to fundamental human rights—right to a nationality, right to life, liberty and personal security, right to freedom of movement, right to take part in the government of their country, right to own property; these and other rights specified by the United Nations in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, 1948; different history of men and women enjoying these rights; how human rights have been constructed and experienced in the United States from the era of colonial settlement to present. Same as HIST:4283 (16A:173), GWSS:4283 (131:173), HRTS:4283 (216:173).
 
AMST:4401 (045:118) American Women Playwrights: 1776-Present3 s.h.
How women in the United States have expressed themselves in theatre since 1776; diversity of voices in works by African American, Asian American, Latina, Native American, European American, lesbian playwrights; female‑authored drama and production in relation to concurrent male‑authored traditions and socioeconomic, political, cultural phenomena. Same as THTR:4401 (049:118).
 
AMST:4999 (045:095) Honors Projectarr.
Independent interdisciplinary research, writing.
 

American Studies, Graduate

AMST:5000 (045:200) Theory and Practice of American Studies I3 s.h.
Theories, methods, cases in culture studies; emphasis on social science approaches. Requirements: American studies graduate standing.
 
AMST:5001 (045:201) Theory and Practice in American Studies II3 s.h.
Requirements: American studies graduate standing.
 
AMST:5002 (045:202) Critical Theories for Sport3 s.h.
Exploration and application of critical theories to contemporary sport; feminism, Marxism, critical race theory, whiteness studies, queer theory, postcolonial theory, postmodernism, and poststructuralism. Same as SPST:5002 (028:202).
 
AMST:6030 (045:230) Seminar: Performing Arts in American Culture3 s.h.
American theater, dance, music, and performance.
 
AMST:6050 (045:250) Seminar: Topics in American Studies3 s.h.
American cultural history; urbanization, mass media, pluralism, assimilation.
 
AMST:6058 (045:258) Seminar: Technology and American Culture3 s.h.
 
AMST:6070 (045:298) Seminar: Topics in Sport Studies1-3 s.h.
Special topics on sport in historical or contemporary contexts. Same as SPST:6070 (028:298).
 
AMST:6078 (045:278) Seminar: Women in Sport3 s.h.
Women's sport involvement in historical and/or contemporary contexts; focus on social class, religion, race, ethnicity, sexuality, medical opinion, economic considerations, political events, and educational philosophies that have influenced women's participation. Same as GWSS:6710 (131:254), SPST:6078 (028:278).
 
AMST:6080 (045:300) American Film and American Culture3 s.h.
Relationships between film and culture as developed in a particular approach, period, subject. Same as CINE:6080 (048:300).
 
AMST:6099 (045:299) American Studies Proseminar1-2 s.h.
Intensive reading on American cultural analysis topics; may include screenings, field trips, guest speakers, special events.
 
AMST:6276 (045:276) Sport in U.S. Culture3 s.h.
Sport as a significant cultural form in the United States; focus on role of sport in cultural reproduction; institutional relationships between sport and politics, economy, education, and media. Same as SPST:6276 (028:276).
 
AMST:7077 (045:296) Sport Studies Workshop1 s.h.
Development of individual research projects for group discussion. Requirements: graduate standing in American studies or sport studies. Same as SPST:7070 (028:295).
 
AMST:7080 (045:450) M.A. Thesis0-6 s.h.
 
AMST:7085 (045:550) Dissertation Writing Workshop1 s.h.
Dissertation preparatory work with peer and faculty critiques, including preparation of a prospectus, research activities, and chapter writing. Requirements: American studies graduate standing with postcomprehensive examination status.
 
AMST:7090 (045:600) Ph.D. Thesisarr.
 
AMST:7994 (045:320) Independent Studyarr.
 

Sport Studies, Lower-Level Undergraduate

SPST:1000 (028:029) First-Year Seminar1-2 s.h.
Small discussion class taught by a faculty member; topics chosen by instructor; may include outside activities (e.g., films, lectures, performances, readings, visits to research facilities). Requirements: first‑ or second‑semester standing.
 
SPST:1074 (028:074) Inequality in American Sport3 s.h.
Cultural meanings of sport in contemporary U.S. culture; American dream as promoted, challenged in sport; sport experiences, inclusion, and exclusion as affected by gender and sexuality, race and ethnicity, social class, age, physical ability/disability, and nationalism. GE: Values, Society, and Diversity. Same as AMST:1074 (045:074), GWSS:1074 (131:074).
 
SPST:2077 (028:073) Sport and Religion in America3 s.h.
Sport as a religion; religiosity in sports; examination of religion and sport as connected in important ways in American society. Same as RELS:2877 (032:077).
 
SPST:2078 (028:078) Women, Sport, and Culture3 s.h.
Feminist analysis of girls' and women's sports experiences, including reproduction of gender through sport, recent changes in women's intercollegiate athletics, media representations of women's sport, feminist critiques, alternatives to sport. Same as GWSS:2078 (131:078).
 
SPST:2079 (028:079) Race and Ethnicity in Sport3 s.h.
Structural and ideological barriers to racial and ethnic equality in sport, with focus on African American sport experiences; historical and contemporary issues, media representations. Same as AFAM:2079 (129:079).
 
SPST:2081 (028:180) Theory and Ethics of Coaching3 s.h.
Philosophical bases, ethical issues; theoretical, practical applications.
 
SPST:2084 (028:084) Sport and Film3 s.h.
Sport films as means of exploring contemporary ideas about sport in the U.S.; focus on narrative structure, characterization, historical, and political contexts; formal aspects of film analysis (e.g., editing, lighting, cinematography). Same as AMST:2084 (045:084).
 

Sport Studies, Upper-Level Undergraduate and Graduate

SPST:3171 (028:171) Baseball in America3 s.h.
Forces that influenced political, economic, and social development of professional baseball in the United States; rise of major league baseball, its relationship to the minor leagues, and development of organized baseball industry. Same as AMST:3171 (045:171).
 
SPST:3172 (028:184) Football in America3 s.h.
Forces that influenced political, economic, and cultural development of college and professional football in the United States; rise of the National Football League and its relationship to college football and commercial media interests.
 
SPST:3174 (028:179) The American Vacation3 s.h.
Development of the Idea of vacation from upper‑class origins to acceptance as part of middle‑ and working‑class life; Niagara Falls, Saratoga Springs, the Catskills, Atlantic City, Idlewild, Coney Island, national parks of the American West, Chicago World's Fair, Gettysburg, Disneyland; how vacation experiences and meanings are shaped by social class, race, gender, age; growth of leisure time, labor legislation, proper use of leisure time, tourism, vacations as social rituals, golden age of family vacations. Same as AMST:3174 (045:174).
 
SPST:3175 (028:175) Sport and the Media3 s.h.
Examination of sport and media's intimate relationship; aesthetic, cultural, political, economic, and industrial factors that shape it.
 
SPST:3176 (028:176) Sport and Nationalism3 s.h.
Role of sport in the phenomenon of nationalism; selected theories; case studies on Ireland, Australia, British West Indies, Cold War U.S., fascist Europe.
 
SPST:3177 (028:177) Sport in the Western World3 s.h.
Development of Western sport; relation to social, political, economic, intellectual factors.
 
SPST:3178 (028:178) American Sport to 19003 s.h.
Growth and institutionalization of sport from colonial times to 1900. Same as AMST:3178 (045:178).
 
SPST:3179 (028:188) American Sport Since 19003 s.h.
Historic development of sport in the United States since 1900; economic forces, professionalization, growth of media. Same as AMST:3179 (045:188).
 
SPST:3180 (028:183) Classics of Sports Journalism: From Jack London to Grantland3 s.h.
Historical examples of celebrated works of sports journalism; focus on long‑form texts. Same as JMC:3190 (019:144).
 
SPST:3181 (028:123) The Business of Sport Communication3 s.h.
Critical and practical approach to understanding contemporary sports media and business practices that mark it; focus on sports media industries and institutions; branding, marketing, demographic, public relations, and promotional factors that shape content. Same as JMC:3181 (019:145).
 
SPST:3193 (028:193) Independent Studyarr.
Problem in a specific area.
 
SPST:3198 (028:187) New Media and the Future of Sport3 s.h.
Emergence and significance of Internet blogs, social media, convergence journalism, video games, and fantasy sports; economic, regulatory, and cultural forces that shape new media sport journalism and entertainment. Same as AMST:3198 (045:187), JMC:3135 (019:143).
 
SPST:4900 (028:198) Topics in Sport Studies1-3 s.h.
Special topics on sport in historical or contemporary contexts.
 
SPST:4950 (028:191) Sport Studies Internship3 s.h.
Application of classroom concepts in practical settings; individualized experience arranged by student in consultation with advisor. Requirements: minimum g.p.a. of 2.50 and completion of 85 s.h.
 
SPST:4999 (028:194) Honors Project1-3 s.h.
 

Sport Studies, Graduate

SPST:5002 (028:202) Critical Theories for Sport3 s.h.
Exploration and application of critical theories to contemporary sport; feminism, Marxism, critical race theory, whiteness studies, queer theory, postcolonial theory, postmodernism, and poststructuralism. Same as AMST:5002 (045:202).
 
SPST:6010 (028:257) Nonprofit Organizational Effectiveness I3 s.h.
Operational and financing aspects of nonprofit management; mission and governance of organization; strategic planning for effective management, including finance, budget, income generation, fund‑raising. Same as SLIS:6430 (021:263), MGMT:9150 (06J:247), LAW:8751 (091:320), HMP:6360 (174:247), SSW:6247 (042:247), URP:6278 (102:278), MUSM:6010 (024:247), RELS:6070 (032:227).
 
SPST:6020 (028:258) Nonprofit Organizational Effectiveness II3 s.h.
Qualities for leadership of nonprofit organizations, including relationships with staff and volunteers; relationship of nonprofit and outside world; marketing, public relations, advocacy strategies for nonprofits. Requirements: for LAW:8752 (091:322)LAW:8751 (091:320); for HMP:6365 (174:248)HMP:6360 (174:247) or MGMT:9150 (06J:247) or MUSM:6010 (024:247). Same as MGMT:9160 (06J:248), LAW:8752 (091:322), SLIS:6435 (021:265), SSW:6248 (042:248), HMP:6365 (174:248), URP:6279 (102:279), MUSM:6020 (024:248), RELS:6075 (032:228).
 
SPST:6070 (028:298) Seminar: Topics in Sport Studies1-3 s.h.
Special topics on sport in historical or contemporary contexts. Same as AMST:6070 (045:298).
 
SPST:6072 (028:378) Seminar in Cultural Studies of Sport3 s.h.
Current theoretical debates in sport studies; applications of critical cultural studies theories to critical analysis of sport.
 
SPST:6074 (028:374) Seminar in Sport History3 s.h.
Topics in sport history; theoretical and methodological issues.
 
SPST:6078 (028:278) Seminar: Women in Sport3 s.h.
Women's sport involvement in historical and/or contemporary contexts; focus on social class, religion, race, ethnicity, sexuality, medical opinion, economic considerations, political events, and educational philosophies that have influenced women's participation. Same as GWSS:6710 (131:254), AMST:6078 (045:278).
 
SPST:6276 (028:276) Sport in U.S. Culture3 s.h.
Sport as a significant cultural form in the United States; focus on role of sport in cultural reproduction; institutional relationships between sport and politics, economy, education, and media. Same as AMST:6276 (045:276).
 
SPST:7070 (028:295) Sport Studies Workshop1 s.h.
Development of individual research projects for group discussion. Requirements: graduate standing in American studies or sport studies. Same as AMST:7077 (045:296).
 
SPST:7080 (028:398) Thesis: M.A.1-6 s.h.
 
SPST:7090 (028:399) Thesis: Ph.D.arr.
 
SPST:7940 (028:299) Independent Studyarr.