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Graduate College

Dean

  • John C. Keller

Senior associate dean

  • Dale Eric Wurster

Associate deans

  • Daniel Berkowitz, Minnetta Gardinier

Assistant dean

Web site: http://www.grad.uiowa.edu/

The University of Iowa has been a leading center of advanced study for more than a century. Presently, the Graduate College accounts for nearly one-fifth of the University's total enrollment. This high ratio reflects the breadth of the University's graduate programs and resources, the strength of a graduate faculty with a long tradition of personal and professional concern for students, and the opportunities afforded graduate students for involvement, recognition, and support.

The Graduate College is responsible for the review and approval of proposals for new graduate programs and for the periodic survey and evaluation of existing programs. Through its administration of scholarship, fellowship, and research assistantship funds, the college encourages research and strengthening of departments. In cooperation with the Office of the Vice President for Research, it offers assistance to individual faculty members in finding the resources necessary for research projects, and it works with the other colleges and departments of the University to formulate policies concerning selection, supervision, and support of graduate students.

The faculty of the Graduate College is made up of all University tenure-track faculty members at the ranks of assistant professor, associate professor, and professor. A 17-member Graduate Council, elected from and by the graduate faculty and the Graduate Student Senate, is the executive committee of the graduate faculty and is advisory to the dean of the Graduate College.

Degrees Offered

The Graduate College confers the Master of Arts (M.A.), Master of Science (M.S.), Master of Accountancy (M.Ac.), Master of Arts in Teaching (M.A.T.), Master of Computer Science (M.C.S.), Master of Fine Arts (M.F.A.), Master of Health Administration (M.H.A.), Master of Physical Therapy (M.P.T.), Master of Public Health (M.P.H.), Educational Specialist (Ed.S.), Master of Science in Nursing (M.S.N.), Master of Social Work (M.S.W.), Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), Doctor of Musical Arts (D.M.A.), Doctor of Nursing Practice (D.N.P.), Doctor of Physical Therapy (D.P.T.), and Doctor of Audiology (Au.D.) degrees.

The college currently confers degrees in the following major fields.

Accounting: M.Ac.**
African American World Studies: M.A.*
American Studies: M.A.*, Ph.D.
Anatomy and Cell Biology: M.S., Ph.D.
Anthropology: M.A.*, Ph.D.
Applied Mathematical and Computational Sciences: Ph.D.
Art: M.A.*, M.F.A.
Art History: M.A.*, Ph.D.
Asian Civilizations: M.A.*
Astronomy: M.S.*
Biochemistry: M.S., Ph.D.
Biology: M.S.***, Ph.D.*** (see Integrated Biology)
Biomedical Engineering: M.S.*, Ph.D.
Biostatistics: M.S.*, Ph.D.
Book Arts: M.F.A.
Business Administration: M.A.*, Ph.D.
Chemical and Biochemical Engineering: M.S.*, Ph.D.
Chemistry: M.S.*, Ph.D.
Civil and Environmental Engineering: M.S.*, Ph.D.
Classics: M.A.*, Ph.D.
Clinical Investigation: M.S.*
Communication Studies: M.A.*, Ph.D.
Community and Behavioral Health: M.S., Ph.D.
Comparative Literature: Ph.D.
Comparative Literature--Translation: M.F.A.
Computer Science: M.S.*, M.C.S.**, Ph.D.
Dance: M.F.A.
Dental Public Health: M.S.
Economics: M.A.*, Ph.D.
Education: M.A.*, M.A.T.**, Ed.S.**, Ph.D.
Educational Policy and Leadership Studies: M.A.*, Ed.S.**, Ph.D.
Electrical and Computer Engineering: M.S.*, Ph.D.
English: M.A.*, M.F.A., Ph.D.
Epidemiology: M.S.*, Ph.D.
Exercise Science: M.S.***
Film and Video Production: M.A.*, M.F.A.
Film Studies: M.A.*, Ph.D.
Free Radical and Radiation Biology: M.S.*, Ph.D.
French and Francophone World Studies: M.A.*, Ph.D.
Genetics: Ph.D.
Geography: M.A.*, Ph.D.
Geoscience: M.S.*, Ph.D.
German: M.A.*, Ph.D.***
Greek: M.A.*
Health and Human Physiology: M.S.*, Ph.D.
Health and Sport Studies: M.A.***, Ph.D.***
Health Management and Policy: M.H.A.**, Ph.D.
Health Services and Policy: Ph.D.
History: M.A.*, Ph.D.
Human Toxicology: M.S., Ph.D.
Immunology: Ph.D.
Industrial Engineering: M.S.*, Ph.D.
Informatics: M.S.*, Ph.D.
Integrated Biology: M.S.*, Ph.D.
Integrative Physiology: Ph.D.
International Studies: M.A.***
Journalism: M.A.*
Latin: M.A.*
Leisure Studies: M.A.*
Library and Information Science: M.A.*
Linguistics: M.A.*, Ph.D.
Mass Communications: Ph.D.
Mathematics: M.S.*, Ph.D.
Mechanical Engineering: M.S.*, Ph.D.
Microbiology: M.S., Ph.D.
Molecular and Cellular Biology: Ph.D.
Molecular Biology: Ph.D.
Molecular Physiology and Biophysics: M.S.*, Ph.D.
Music: M.A.*, M.F.A., D.M.A., Ph.D.
Neuroscience: Ph.D.
Nursing: M.S.N.*, D.N.P., Ph.D.
Occupational and Environmental Health: M.S.*, Ph.D.
Operative Dentistry: M.S.
Oral Science: M.S., Ph.D.
Orthodontics: M.S.
Pathology: M.S.
Pharmacology: M.S., Ph.D.
Pharmacy: M.S.*, Ph.D.
Philosophy: M.A.*, Ph.D.
Physical Rehabilitation Science: Ph.D.
Physical Therapy: M.A.*, D.P.T.
Physics: M.S.*, Ph.D.
Political Science: M.A.*, Ph.D.
Psychological and Quantitative Foundations: M.A.*, Ed.S.**, Ph.D.
Psychology: M.A.*, Ph.D.
Public Health: M.P.H.** 
Rehabilitation and Counselor Education: M.A.*, Ph.D. 
Religious Studies: M.A.*, Ph.D.
Science Education: M.S.*, M.A.T.**, Ph.D.
Second Language Acquisition: Ph.D.
Social Work: M.S.W.*, Ph.D.
Sociology: M.A.*, Ph.D.
Spanish: M.A.*, Ph.D.
Spanish Creative Writing: M.F.A.
Speech and Hearing Science: Ph.D.
Speech Pathology and Audiology: M.A.*, Au.D.
Statistical Genetics: Ph.D.***
Statistics: M.S.*, Ph.D.
Stomatology: M.S.***
Strategic Communication: MA**
Teaching and Learning: M.A.*, M.A.T.**, Ph.D.
Theatre Arts: M.F.A.
Translational Biomedicine: M.S.**, Ph.D.
Urban and Regional Planning: M.A.*, M.S.*
Women's Studies: Ph.D.***

*Degree offered with or without thesis
**Nonthesis degree
***Student entry suspended

Interdisciplinary Degree Programs

The Graduate College participates in a number of University of Iowa interdisciplinary degree programs. Detailed information about the following master's and doctoral degree programs is provided later in these Graduate College sections of the Catalog: Applied Mathematical and Computational Sciences, Genetics, Human Toxicology, Immunology, Informatics, International Studies, Molecular and Cellular Biology, Neuroscience, and Translational Biomedicine.

In addition to the degree programs listed above, the graduate faculty has authorized the awarding of interdisciplinary master's and doctoral degrees. Students seeking approval for interdisciplinary master's and doctoral programs must previously have been admitted to and enrolled in a departmental program in the Graduate College. See sections X.A. and XII.D. in the Manual of Rules and Regulations of the Graduate College on the college's web site or in this section of the Catalog.

Joint Programs

Joint Programs Offered Through the Graduate College

Various joint programs have been developed whereby students work simultaneously toward two degrees. Consult the appropriate Catalog sections for more information. Established joint programs include business administration/library and information science; health management and policy/business administration; health management and policy/urban and regional planning; occupational and environmental health/urban and regional planning; public health/law; public health/medicine; public health/pharmacy; public health/veterinary medicine; and social work/urban and regional planning.

Joint B.S./Ph.D.: Biochemistry

The joint B.S./Ph.D. program in biochemistry enables Bachelor of Science students majoring in biochemistry to begin work toward the Ph.D. while completing the bachelor's degree. Students admitted to the program may count 12 s.h. of credit toward both the B.S. and Ph.D. degree requirements. Offered by the Graduate College, the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, and the Carver College of Medicine; see Biochemistry in the Catalog.

Joint B.A.: Biology/M.P.H. with Epidemiology Subtrack or M.S.: Epidemiology

The joint B.A. in biology/M.P.H. with epidemiology subtrack and the joint B.A. in biology/M.S. in epidemiology enable Bachelor of Arts students majoring in biology to begin work toward the M.P.H. or M.S. while completing the bachelor's degree. Students admitted to either program may count 12 s.h. of credit toward both the B.A. and the M.P.H. or M.S. degree requirements; they also may maximize their selection of upper-level classes for advanced training in epidemiology. Offered by the Graduate College, the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, and the College of Public Health; see Biology, Master of Public Health Program, and Epidemiology in the Catalog. 

Joint B.S.E./M.S.: Biomedical Engineering

The joint B.S.E./M.S. program in biomedical engineering enables undergraduate students majoring in biomedical engineering to begin work toward the M.S. while completing the bachelor's degree. Students admitted to the program may count a limited amount of credit toward both the B.S.E. and M.S. degree requirements. They also may attend and participate in the departmental graduate seminar and work on a master's thesis or research project before they have been awarded the B.S.E. degree. Offered by the Graduate College and the College of Engineering; see Biomedical Engineering in the Catalog.

Joint B.S.E.: Biomedical Engineering/M.S.: Occupational and Environmental Health

The joint B.S.E. in biomedical engineering/M.S. in occupational and environmental health enables undergraduate students majoring in biomedical engineering to begin work toward the M.S. in occupational and environmental health while completing the bachelor's degree. Students admitted to the program may count a limited amount of credit toward both the B.S.E. and M.S. degree requirements. Offered by the Graduate College, the College of Engineering, and the College of Public Health; see Biomedical Engineering and Occupational and Environmental Health in the Catalog.

Joint B.S.E./M.S.: Chemical and Biochemical Engineering

The joint B.S.E./M.S. program in chemical and biochemical engineering enables undergraduate students majoring in chemical engineering to begin work toward the M.S. while completing the bachelor's degree. Students admitted to the program may count 12 s.h. of course work, typically advanced chemistry sequences and electives, toward both the B.S.E. and M.S. degree requirements. Offered by the Graduate College and the College of Engineering; see Chemical and Biochemical Engineering in the Catalog.

Joint B.S.E.: Chemical Engineering/M.S.: Civil and Environmental Engineering

The joint B.S.E. in chemical engineering/M.S. in civil and environmental engineering enables undergraduate students majoring in chemical engineering to begin work toward the M.S. in civil and environmental engineering while completing the bachelor's degree. Students admitted to the program may count 12 s.h. of course work toward both the B.S.E. and M.S. degree requirements. Offered by the Graduate College and the College of Engineering; see Chemical and Biochemical Engineering and Civil and Environmental Engineering in the Catalog. 

Joint B.S.E./M.S.: Civil and Environmental Engineering

The joint B.S.E./M.S. program in civil and environmental engineering enables undergraduate students majoring in civil engineering to begin work toward the M.S. while completing the bachelor's degree. Students admitted to the program may count a limited amount of credit toward both the B.S.E. and M.S. degree requirements. They also may attend and participate in the departmental graduate seminar and work on a master's thesis or research project before they have been awarded the B.S.E. degree. Offered by the Graduate College and the College of Engineering; see Civil and Environmental Engineering in the Catalog.

Joint B.A. or B.S.: Computer Science/M.C.S.

The joint B.A. or B.S. in computer science/M.C.S. program enables undergraduate students majoring in computer science to begin work toward the M.C.S. while completing the bachelor's degree. Students admitted to the program may count 12 s.h. of course work, typically advanced technical courses and electives, toward both the bachelor's and the M.C.S. degree requirements. Offered by the Graduate College and the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences; see Computer Science (College of Liberal Arts and Sciences) in the Catalog.

Joint B.S.E./M.S.: Electrical and Computer Engineering

The joint B.S.E./M.S. program in electrical and computer engineering enables undergraduate students majoring in electrical engineering to begin work toward the M.S. while completing the bachelor's degree. Students admitted to the program may count 9 s.h. toward both the B.S.E. and M.S. degree requirements. They also may count an additional 3 s.h. toward the M.S. degree requirements and engage in thesis-level research before they have been awarded the B.S.E. degree. Offered by the Graduate College and the College of Engineering; see Electrical and Computer Engineering in the Catalog.

Joint B.A./M.A.: German

The joint B.A./M.A. program in German enables undergraduate students majoring in German to begin work toward the M.S. while completing the bachelor's degree. Students admitted to the program may count 12 s.h. of credit toward both the B.A. and M.A. degree requirements. They also have the opportunity for early entrance into advanced courses in German. Offered by the Graduate College and the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences; see German (College of Liberal Arts and Sciences) in the Catalog.

Joint B.S.E./M.S.: Industrial Engineering

The joint B.S.E./M.S. program in industrial engineering enables undergraduate students majoring in industrial engineering to begin work toward the M.S. while completing the bachelor's degree. Students admitted to the program may count 6 s.h. toward both the B.S.E. and M.S. degree requirements. They also may count an additional 6 s.h. toward the M.S. degree requirements, attend one of the department's graduate seminars, and work on master's thesis research before they have been awarded the B.S.E. degree. Offered by the Graduate College and the College of Engineering; see Mechanical and Industrial Engineering in the Catalog.

Joint Law and Graduate Degrees

The College of Law and several Graduate College programs and schools have developed joint programs in which students pursue the Juris Doctor (J.D.) degree and a graduate degree concurrently. Offered by the Graduate College and the College of Law; see College of Law in the Catalog.

Joint M.A.: Library and Information Science/Certificate in Book Studies

The joint M.A. in library and information science and Certificate in Book Studies/Book Arts and Technologies prepares students for careers in special collections librarianship. Students admitted to the program receive training in the management of varied types of special collections, such as rare books, manuscripts, archives, graphics, music, and ephemera. Offered by the Graduate College; see Library and Information Science and Center for the Book (both Graduate College) in the Catalog.

Joint B.A./M.A.: Linguistics with TESL Focus

The joint B.A./M.A. program in linguistics with TESL (Teaching English as a Second Language) focus enables students majoring in linguistics to begin work toward the M.A. while completing the bachelor's degree. Students admitted to the program may count 12 s.h. of advanced course work toward both the B.A. and M.A. degree requirements and may take selected graduate-level courses before they have been awarded the B.A. degree. They also may gain experience teaching ESL at the college level early in their graduate careers. Offered by the Graduate College and the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences; see Linguistics (College of Liberal Arts and Sciences) in the Catalog.

Joint B.S.E./M.S.: Mechanical Engineering

The joint B.S.E./M.S. program in mechanical engineering enables undergraduates majoring in mechanical engineering to begin work toward the M.S. while completing the bachelor's degree. Students admitted to the program may count 6 s.h. toward both the B.S.E. and M.S. degree requirements. They also may count an additional 6 s.h. toward the M.S. degree requirements, attend a graduate seminar, and participate in master's thesis research before they have been awarded the B.S.E. degree. Offered by the Graduate College and the College of Engineering; see Mechanical and Industrial Engineering in the Catalog.

Joint B.S.E.: Mechanical Engineering/M.S.: Civil and Environmental Engineering

The joint B.S.E. in mechanical engineering/M.S. in civil and environmental engineering enables undergraduate students majoring in mechanical engineering to begin work toward the M.S. in civil and environmental engineering while completing the bachelor's degree. Students admitted to the program may count 9 s.h. of course work toward both the B.S.E. and M.S. degree requirements. They also may count an additional 3 s.h. toward the M.S. degree requirements before they have been awarded the B.S.E. degree. Offered by the Graduate College and the College of Engineering; see Mechanical and Industrial Engineering and Civil and Environmental Engineering in the Catalog.

Joint M.D./Ph.D. (Medical Scientist Training Program)

The joint Doctor of Medicine/Doctor of Philosophy program prepares students for careers in academic medicine, with emphasis on basic and clinical research. Offered by the Graduate College and the Carver College of Medicine; see Medical Scientist Training Program (Carver College of Medicine) in the Catalog.

Joint B.S./Ph.D.: Microbiology

The joint B.S./Ph.D. program in microbiology enables undergraduate students majoring in microbiology to begin work toward the Ph.D. while completing the bachelor's degree. Students admitted to the program may count 12 s.h. of credit toward both the B.S. and Ph.D. degree requirements. Offered by the Graduate College, the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, and the Carver College of Medicine; see Microbiology in the Catalog.

Joint B.A.: Psychology/M.P.H. with Community and Behavioral Health Subtrack

The joint B.A. in psychology/M.P.H. program with community and behavioral health subtrack enables Bachelor of Arts students majoring in psychology to begin work toward the M.P.H. while completing the bachelor's degree. Students admitted to the joint program may count 12 s.h. of credit toward both the B.A. and M.P.H. degree requirements. Offered by the Graduate College, the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, and the College of Public Health; see Psychology and Master of Public Health Program in the Catalog.

Joint B.A./M.A.T. with Science Education Subtrack

The joint B.A./M.A.T. program with science education subtrack enables Bachelor of Arts students majoring in biology, chemistry, environmental sciences, or physics to begin work toward the M.A.T. while completing the bachelor's degree. Students admitted to the program may count 18 s.h. of credit toward both the B.A. and M.A.T. degree requirements. Offered by the Graduate College, the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, and the College of Education; see Biology, Chemistry, Environmental Sciences, or Physics and Astronomy (College of Liberal Arts and Sciences) and Teaching and Learning (College of Education) in the Catalog.

Joint Au.D./Ph.D.: Speech and Hearing Science

The joint Au.D./Ph.D. program in speech and hearing science is designed for students who would like to practice audiology and hold a faculty position at a university. Students admitted to the program work concurrently toward the Doctor of Audiology and the Doctor of Philosophy; they may count 30 s.h. toward the requirements of both degrees. Offered by the Graduate College and the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences; see Communication Sciences and Disorders (College of Liberal Arts and Sciences) in the Catalog.

Certificate Programs

Several Graduate College programs offer certificates. For detailed information about each one, see Center for the BookCognitive Science of Language, Informatics, Rhetorics of Inquiry, and Transportation Studies.

The Graduate College also participates with other University of Iowa colleges in offering the following graduate certificates.

Advanced Practice Nursing

The Certificate in Advanced Practice Nursing is a program for Doctor of Nursing Practice (D.N.P.) students that offers advanced clinical training in five specialty areas: adult/gerontology nurse practitioner, family nurse practitioner, neonatal nurse practitioner, pediatric nurse practitioner, and psychiatric/mental health nursing. Students who complete the D.N.P. program and the certificate requirements are qualified to sit for a professional certification exam. Completion of the certificate program is noted on the student's transcript. See College of Nursing in the Catalog.

Aging Studies

The Aging Studies Program is a multidisciplinary certificate program administered by the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences in cooperation with other University of Iowa colleges. The program is designed to complement graduate degree programs or to serve as a stand-alone nondegree program for students with academic, professional, research, or service career interests in aging. Completion of the certificate program is noted on the student's transcript. See Aging Studies (College of Liberal Arts and Sciences) in the Catalog.

Agricultural Safety and Health

The Certificate in Agricultural Safety and Health is a postbaccalaureate program for practicing health care professionals serving rural areas and for health professions students who intend to practice in rural areas. The program is designed to help rural health professionals address safety and health issues in farm settings. Completion of the certificate program is noted on the student's transcript. See Agricultural Safety and Health (College of Public Health) in the Catalog.

American Indian and Native Studies

The American Indian and Native Studies Program (AINSP) offers an interdisciplinary certificate program focusing on the histories, cultures, languages, arts, religious traditions, political and social organizations, economies, geographies, literatures, and contemporary legal and political concerns of Native Americans of the United States as well as other indigenous peoples of the Western Hemisphere. Completion of the certificate program is noted on the student's transcript. See American Indian and Native Studies (College of Liberal Arts and Sciences) in the Catalog.

Biostatistics

The Certificate in Biostatistics is open to students in University of Iowa graduate degree programs outside biostatistics and to individuals admitted to the Graduate College as nondegree students. The certificate program enables students to add a formal biostatistics emphasis to their degree programs. Students who complete the certificate in conjunction with a graduate degree may count a maximum of 6 s.h. of certificate credit toward their graduate degree. See Biostatistics (College of Public Health) in the Catalog.

College Teaching

The Certificate in College Teaching complements discipline-oriented graduate programs and prepares students for careers in postsecondary education. The program is open to graduate students working toward a Ph.D. or other terminal graduate degree. Completion of the certificate program is noted on the student's transcript. See College of Education in the Catalog.

Emerging Infectious Disease Epidemiology

The Certificate in Emerging Infectious Disease Epidemiology is a postbaccalaureate program designed to meet the training needs in emerging infectious disease of international public health professionals as well as University of Iowa graduate students. Applicants to the program must hold a bachelor's degree. Completion of the certificate program is noted on the student's transcript. See Emerging Infectious Disease Epidemiology (College of Public Health) in the Catalog.

Gender, Women's, and Sexuality Studies

The Certificate in Gender, Women's, and Sexuality Studies is open to students enrolled in graduate degree programs. Completion of the certificate program is noted on the student's transcript. See Gender, Women's, and Sexuality Studies (College of Liberal Arts and Sciences) in the Catalog.

Global Health Studies

The Global Health Studies Program emphasizes international health problems and solutions in the developing and developed worlds, including the United States. The interdisciplinary certificate program is open to both graduate and undergraduate students. Admission is competitive but does not require previous academic study in the health sciences. Completion of the certificate program is noted on the student's transcript. See Global Health Studies (College of Liberal Arts and Sciences) in the Catalog.

Multicultural Education and Culturally Competent Practice

The Certificate in Multicultural Education and Culturally Competent Practice is open to graduate students enrolled in graduate degree programs and to postbaccalaureate nondegree graduate students. The curriculum, which consists of five courses (15 s.h.), begins with an introductory course and ends with a capstone course. Contact the Office of Graduate Inclusion to learn more about the certificate program.

Sacred Music

The Certificate in Sacred Music is an interdisciplinary program with courses in sacred music, choral conducting and literature, keyboard, voice, religion, and art and art history. The program is open to students enrolled in a graduate degree program and to nondegree students who have been admitted to the Graduate College and who have consent of the certificate's faculty advisor. Completion of the certificate program is noted on the student's transcript. See Music (College of Liberal Arts and Sciences) in the Catalog.

Translational and Clinical Investigation

The Certificate in Translational and Clinical Investigation is designed for clinicians who seek advanced training in clinical methodology and applied patient-oriented research skills. Students in the certificate program must be practicing academic clinicians who have completed doctoral training. Completion of the program is noted on the student's transcript. See Epidemiology (College of Public Health) in the Catalog.

Affiliated Program

The Office of Graduate Inclusion (OGI) is dedicated to providing academic assistance to graduate students from underrepresented populations across graduate programs; to helping build a sustainable practice of inclusion that nourishes and attracts underrepresented graduate students campuswide; and to helping build community through individual and group activities focused on successful academic progress.

OGI's specific goals are to increase numbers of underrepresented minorities in graduate programs; increase the number of doctoral students among U.S. minorities in graduate programs at Iowa; create a department-centered effort of graduate inclusion; offer support to University of Iowa departments and programs that are interested in building, extending, or sustaining their practices of inclusion; support faculty-based efforts for recruiting top graduate scholars who are members of underrepresented minorities; provide mentoring and support for students throughout their degree programs; and provide information on grant opportunities for departments and programs that are pursuing graduate inclusion.

Research Resources

Many of the University's diverse research activities are centrally administered by the Office of the Vice President for Research, which has a cooperative relationship with the Graduate College.

Financial Support

Approximately half of the University's graduate students receive some form of University-administered financial assistance. For eligibility requirements and application procedures, see "Section VII. Graduate Appointments" in the Manual of Rules and Regulations of the Graduate College The following are the primary sources of assistance.

Teaching and Research Assistantships

Teaching and research assistantships are available in most departments. Assistantship stipends typically range between $17,330 for a half-time academic-year appointment and $21,180 for a half-time fiscal-year appointment; assistants also are eligible for tuition scholarships. Assistants (one-quarter-time or more) are classified as residents for fee purposes.

Iowa Arts Fellowships

Iowa Arts Fellowships are for University of Iowa graduate students entering M.F.A. programs. Typical stipends are $18,500 for the academic year, with all tuition (excluding mandatory fees) paid, plus a health insurance allowance, for a maximum of two years (the second year being contingent on demonstrated exceptional progress toward completion of the M.F.A.). There are no departmental service obligations.

Iowa Performance Fellowships

Iowa Performance Fellowships are for first-year D.M.A. candidates in a performance area of music. Recipients are nominated by the School of Music. Awards include academic-year fellowships ($17,500 for year one, $8,665 for years two and three), summer fellowships ($2,000 for years one and two), and tuition (excluding mandatory fees). The School of Music provides a one-quarter-time research assistantship in years two and three.

Dean's Graduate Research Fellowships

Dean's Graduate Research Fellowships are awarded to first-year graduate students who are members of minority groups underrepresented in the nominating department's discipline area. Doctoral students receive an annual stipend of $22,000 ($18,000 for the academic year and $4,000 for summer session) plus tuition (excluding mandatory fees) for the first year and final dissertation year. They also receive a half-time research or teaching assistantship stipend, tuition (excluding mandatory fees), and a summer stipend ($4,000 if they register) during years two and three. Students earning a terminal master's degree (e.g., M.F.A.) receive fellowship support equivalent to one academic year ($17,000) and are eligible to receive two summer session stipends ($3,000 each if they register) and tuition (excluding mandatory fees) for two years. The master's fellowship support may be distributed over two academic years ($8,500 per year), if requested. Both doctoral and master's degree fellows are expected to conduct mentored research and/or scholarly activities while on fellowship support during the academic year and summer sessions.

Presidential Graduate Fellowships

Presidential Graduate Fellowships provide five-year awards for doctoral students on a year-round basis. Fellows receive an annual stipend of $24,000 ($18,500 for the academic year and a $5,500 summer stipend), plus full tuition (excluding mandatory fees) for years one and four; a research assistant or teaching assistant stipend during the academic year and a $5,500 summer stipend and full tuition (excluding mandatory fees) for years two and three. Recipients have no duties during their fellowship years and are eligible for up to four summers of support. In their final year, awardees are eligible to apply for a Ballard and Seashore Dissertation-Year Fellowship; those who do not receive the fellowship are awarded a research assistantship, a teaching assistantship, or a fellowship from their department. 

Graduate College Summer Fellowships

Graduate College Summer Fellowships are for advanced doctoral students who have completed their comprehensive exams, are working to complete their dissertations, and so do not otherwise have funding for the summer session. Awards provide a summer stipend of $3,000 plus tuition for 1-2 s.h. at the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences tuition rate. Awardees must enroll for the six-week or eight-week summer session; students enrolled in the three-week summer session are not eligible to receive the fellowship.

T. Anne Cleary International Research Fellowships

The T. Anne Cleary International Research Fellowships are for doctoral students who have completed all predissertation requirements, including the comprehensive examination, and who will use the fellowship for dissertation research outside North America. The awards may vary from $1,500 to $5,000 and are meant to supplement other research funds. Doctoral students in any discipline may apply. Past recipients of the Cleary fellowship and Doctor of Musical Arts students who choose the D.M.A. essay option are not eligible.

Ballard and Seashore Dissertation-Year Fellowships

Ballard and Seashore Dissertation-Year Fellowships are final-year fellowships for doctoral students in the humanities and social sciences who have completed all doctoral degree requirements except their dissertation. Recipients are nominated by their departments. Fellowships provide $18,000 for the academic year plus tuition (excluding mandatory fees) for up to 2 s.h. and a health insurance allowance.

Scholarships

Scholarships provide up to full tuition.

GRADUATE STUDENT TRAVEL AWARDS

Graduate student travel awards provide reimbursement for travel by students who present research and scholarship results to professional conferences. Awards are competitive across disciplines and vary from $200 to $400. Funds are administered by the Graduate Student Senate and the Graduate College.

Other Sources

For other sources of financial support, contact the Office of Student Financial Aid.

Many departments offer additional support through traineeships, part-time employment in research, or part-time teaching appointments. The Office of the Vice President for Research maintains a library of information on public and private agencies that provide funds for research and graduate study. Much material has been collected concerning awards for overseas study.

Graduate Student Senate

The Graduate Student Senate is the University graduate student body representative organization. Representatives are elected annually from each University department that has a graduate degree program. The senate's primary purpose is to serve the interests of the graduate student body in matters affecting its welfare. The senate advises the dean of the Graduate College on matters pertaining to the college.

Manual of Rules and Regulations of the Graduate College

The following text is from the Manual of Rules and Regulations of the Graduate College. The most up-to-date version of this manual is available online; see "For Students" on the Graduate College web site.

The Academic Program

Section I. Admission to the Graduate College

A. APPLICATION PROCEDURE

All students seeking to register for the first time in the Graduate College of The University of Iowa must secure formal admission from the director of Admissions. Applicants may obtain the proper forms from the Office of Admissions. Prospective students may also download the application or apply online from the admissions web site.

In addition to these forms, official transcripts, test scores, and other supporting material must be submitted by the designated deadline prior to the session in which admission is expected. Specific deadline dates will be established by the dean of the Graduate College and the director of Admissions and printed in the Catalog and elsewhere.

B. ADVANCED MEASUREMENT TESTS

Each graduate program will determine which, if any, advanced measurement test(s) will be required of the applicants to the program. Examples of such examinations include the General (Aptitude) Test of the Graduate Record Examination (GRE), the GRE Subject (Advanced) Tests, and the Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT). For those departments or programs that choose to require an examination, the examination must be required for all students; there cannot be exempt categories. Additionally, a final admission decision will not be made by the Office of Graduate Admissions until the student's scores have been received. The judgment of acceptable levels of performance on these tests, and the weight of such scores in the overall decision-making process, is left to the department or program.

C. ENGLISH FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS

Prior to consideration for admission, international student applicants whose native language is other than English must take and pass either the TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) or the IELTS (International English Language Testing System), unless they have received a degree from an accredited college or university in the United States, the United Kingdom, Canada (except Quebec), Australia, or New Zealand. These examinations are given at various times of the year and in many centers throughout the world.

International students transferring from unfinished degree programs of other universities in the United States who have not taken either of these examinations, or who have received a score lower than the minimum established by the Graduate College dean, must take the TOEFL or IELTS examination and receive a passing score prior to consideration for admission.

Students who barely pass the established minimum on the TOEFL, as well as all IELTS submitters, will be required to sit for an English evaluation upon arrival in Iowa City. The Graduate College will require these students to take and pass recommended course work in English usage at The University of Iowa designed especially for international students.

D. EARLY ADMISSION

A student who is within 6 s.h. of having satisfied all the requirements for the bachelor's degree at The University of Iowa or any other accredited college may be given provisional admission.

E. CANDIDACY

Admission to the Graduate College is not the equivalent of acceptance as a candidate for an advanced degree, which must be earned through work successfully completed at The University of Iowa. (See "Section X. Master's Degrees" and "Section XII. Doctor's Degrees.")

F. DECLARATION OF MAJOR AND DEGREE

Every applicant for admission must indicate on the application form the department or program of major interest and the degree, certificate, or professional objective he or she intends to pursue. The only exceptions to this regulation are the limited number of applicants registered as nondegree ("special") students. (See definition of nondegree status in next section.) Changes in the major or degree status may be made in the course of a student's graduate study with the approval of the department to which the transfer is proposed. To initiate such action, the student must file a change of major or degree status in the Office of Admissions.

G. ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS AND STATUS

Graduates of any college or university accredited by regional accrediting associations may be admitted to the Graduate College if their academic records meet the required standards. Upon admission, all students fall into one of the following three categories:

1. Regular--For students who have met the minimum requirements for admission and who have been accepted by a department, or interdepartmental degree program, for work leading to a graduate degree or certificate or for professional improvement. The minimum g.p.a. for admission as a regular student to all graduate programs is 3.00.

Departments or programs may petition the Graduate College dean for admission of a student whose g.p.a. is lower than 3.00, if there is sufficient evidence of the student's academic and/or professional achievement indicating his/her potential for success in a graduate program.

Departments, or committees in charge of interdepartmental degree programs, may, and often do, set higher minimum admission requirements than those set forth above for the Graduate College as a whole. Information concerning departmental or program requirements may be obtained directly from the executive of the department concerned.

2. Conditional--Students who are interested in working toward a graduate degree or certificate but who are required by a department to demonstrate their ability to do satisfactory graduate work before being admitted to regular status. To be admitted on a conditional basis, the student must be recommended by a department, which will assume responsibility for advising him or her. The student on conditional status must achieve regular status within two sessions of registration in the Graduate College by attaining a g.p.a. of at least 3.00 and acceptance by the major department, or be dismissed.

3. Nondegree (Special)--Students with a valid bachelor's degree and at least a 2.50 g.p.a. are eligible to register for a total of no more than two courses per semester. In addition, a nondegree student may not accumulate more than two courses within a given department/program under this classification. These students must be approved for admission by the Graduate College and the Office of Admissions. Nondegree graduate students are not eligible for a graduate degree.

H. ADMISSION OF FACULTY MEMBERS TO GRADUATE STUDY

Persons who hold faculty rank of assistant professor (including clinical assistant professor) or above at The University of Iowa may be admitted as nondegree students. (See "Section G" above.) A person holding faculty rank as specified above may petition the Graduate College dean for permission to enter a departmental program for work leading to an advanced degree, certificate, or professional improvement except in the department of his or her appointment or a closely related department. Such petitions must have prior approval of the department of appointment, dean of the college of appointment, the department in which study is to be pursued, and the Graduate College.

I. READMISSION

If a student's enrollment is interrupted for any reason so that she or he is not enrolled for three consecutive academic sessions (including the spring, summer, and fall sessions but excluding the winter session), the student must apply for readmission. The readmission application form must be used. The Graduate College will not require new letters of recommendation, a new Personal Statement section, a written explanation of the reasons for the absence, or a plan for degree completion. However, departments and programs may choose to require any or all of the foregoing.

Section II. Registration

A. STANDARD SCHEDULE

Students registered in the Graduate College may register for no more than 15 semester hours in all courses eligible for graduate credit 100 (3000)-level or above. A maximum, graduate semester-hour registration will include all courses numbered 100 (legacy numbering) or 3000 (new renumbering) and above, whether they are offered as on-campus, extension, or workshop classes. In a schedule of mixed graduate and undergraduate courses, 2 hours of undergraduate credit may be substituted for 1 hour of graduate credit, with registration limited to a total of 18 semester hours. This equivalency applies to the calculation of academic load only. Graduate credit is not given for courses numbered under 100 (3000). In 2014 the summer session will expand to 12 weeks. The maximum registration for the twelve-week summer session is 12 semester hours. Corresponding maximums for the eight-week, six-week and four-week summer sessions and the three-week winter session are 8, 6, 4, and 3 semester hours, respectively. The maximum semester-hour registration for work scheduled outside of a regular summer session will be arranged on a basis proportionate to that stated above with the approval of the Graduate College dean.

Nine semester hours in the regular semester constitute full-time registration. (Fellows are required to carry at least 9 semester hours during a semester as a condition of their appointments.) One-quarter-time and one-third-time appointees are permitted to register for the maximum 15 semester hours per semester and 12 semester hours during the twelve-week summer session.

B. COURSES NOT INCLUDED IN FULL REGISTRATION

In addition to a full schedule, a graduate student may register for offered courses carrying 0 s.h. of credit.

C. CHANGES IN ANNOUNCED CREDIT

Graduate students may not register for more credit than that offered for any course, but may register for less credit, or no credit, by permission of the instructor. The number of courses a graduate student may take for limited or no credit is subject to the consent of the advisor and the approval of the dean of the Graduate College.

D. REDUCED SCHEDULES FOR TEACHING AND RESEARCH ASSISTANTS AND OTHER APPOINTEES*

1. One-half-time appointees may register for not more than 12 s.h. during a semester or 6 s.h. during the eight-week summer session.

2. Five-eighths-time appointees may register for not more than 10 s.h. during a semester or 5 s.h. during the eight-week summer session.

3. Two-thirds- and three-quarter-time appointees may register for not more than 9 s.h. during a semester or 5 s.h. during the eight-week summer session.

*See Section VII.F. for information regarding graduate assistant overload appointments (those more than one-half-time/20 hours per week).

E. RETROACTIVE REGISTRATION

No form of retroactive registration is permitted.

F. REGISTRATION FOR PART OF A SESSION

A graduate student may register at any time during the semester or the eight-week summer session for not more than 1 s.h. of credit for each of the remaining weeks of classes (not including the examination period) in the term. The total registration may not exceed the 15 s.h. permitted for a semester and the 8 s.h. permitted for the eight-week summer session. Registration after the last day of the second week of a semester or the third day of the second week of a summer session is permitted only in courses involving special projects, readings, individual study, thesis, or research, with the signed approval of the instructor concerned and the Graduate College dean. Proportional credit limitations and deadlines for the three-week and six-week summer sessions will be established on a prorated basis.

G. EXTRAMURAL REGISTRATION

After admission to a departmental program in the Graduate College, registration for work done off campus may be accepted for residence credit under the following circumstances:

1. Traveling Scholar Program of the Committee on Institutional Cooperation (see "Section III").

2. Research at approved locations under the direction of members of the graduate faculty of The University of Iowa.

3. Fieldwork as part of a regularly scheduled course or research program.

4. Courses taught off campus by members of the graduate faculty (see "Section X.D" and "Section XII.C" for minimum semester hours required on campus for the master's and doctor's degrees).

5. Residence graduate credit from another Iowa Regents' university (see "Section V.B").

6. As many as 9 s.h. of graduate work taken at the Quad Cities Graduate Center from faculty other than faculty of the Iowa Regents' universities, provided the work is acceptable to the student's major department for the specified degree.

Extramural registration does not count toward residence credit in the following circumstance:

Course work transferred from another institution.

H. SYSTEM OF COURSE NUMBERS

Courses primarily for graduate students are numbered 200 or above in each department. Courses open to and carrying credit for both graduate and undergraduate students are numbered from 100 to 199. A student must be enrolled in the Graduate College in order to earn graduate credit for course work numbered 100 or above. Courses below 100 are not accepted for graduate credit irrespective of a student's classification. Graduate credit may not be earned for taking courses numbered below 100 by registering in such courses as readings, special projects, or independent study having course numbers of 100 or above.

I. AUDITING OF COURSES

Upon approval of the instructor and the advisor, graduate students may audit courses for zero credit. Fee assessment for auditing courses is based on the number of hours for which the course is offered, with a minimum of 1 s.h. Auditing is permitted only for a student who is currently registered. See "Section VI.C" for the marking system.

J. DROPPING OF COURSES

All graduate students who drop courses after the deadline date established by the dean of the Graduate College for each session and published by the registrar shall receive the grade of F unless the entire registration is withdrawn. This regulation may be waived by the Graduate College dean only on the recommendation of the Student Health director or the Counseling Service. If a student withdraws registration after the deadline date, the student must obtain permission from the dean of the Graduate College before being permitted to reregister.

Section III. Traveling Scholar Program

A. PURPOSE

The program, under the auspices of the Committee on Institutional Cooperation representing 13 universities in the Midwest, enables a doctoral student to take advantage of special resources available on another campus but not available on his or her own campus: special course offerings, research opportunities, unique laboratories, and library collections.

B. PROCEDURE

1. A CIC Traveling Scholar first must be recommended by his or her own graduate advisor, who will approach an appropriate faculty member at the possible host institution in regard to a visiting arrangement.

2. After agreement by the student's advisor and the faculty member at the host institution, graduate deans at both institutions will be fully informed by the advisor and have the power to approve or disapprove.

3. A CIC Traveling Scholar will be registered at the home university, and fees will be collected and kept by that institution.

4. Credit for the work taken will be recorded at the home university.

5. Those desiring additional information should inquire at the office of the Graduate College.

C. CONDITIONS

CIC Traveling Scholars will normally be limited to two semesters or three quarters on another campus. Each university retains its full right to accept or reject any student who wishes to study under its auspices.

Section IV. Academic Standing, Probation, and Dismissal

A. NONDOCTORAL STUDENTS

A nondoctoral departmental (master's, professional improvement, certificate) student, except one on conditional status, shall be placed on probation if, after completing 8 s.h. of graduate work, the student's cumulative grade-point average on graduate work done at The University of Iowa falls below 2.75. If, after completing 8 more s.h. of graduate work at this University, the student's cumulative grade-point average remains below 2.75, the student shall be denied permission to reregister within any departmental program; otherwise the student shall be restored to good standing.*

Nondoctoral, nondepartmental (nondegree, extension, workshop) students shall be evaluated for probation and dismissal purposes based on the same semester-hour sequence as stated above, at a minimum cumulative grade-point average of 2.50.

*This requirement shall apply to students entering nondoctoral departmental programs beginning with the fall 2001 semester. A minimum cumulative grade-point average of 2.50 is required of nondoctoral departmental students admitted prior to that session.

B. DOCTORAL STUDENTS

A doctoral student on regular status shall be placed on probation if, after completing 8 s.h. of graduate work, the student's cumulative grade-point average on graduate work done at The University of Iowa falls below 3.00. If, after completing 8 more s.h. of graduate work at this University, the student's cumulative grade-point average remains below the required level, the student shall be dropped from the program and denied permission to reregister unless the student applies and is accepted for a nondoctoral degree or certificate program. If, after completing the second 8 s.h., the cumulative grade-point average is at least 3.00, the student is returned to good standing.*

*This requirement shall apply to students entering doctoral programs beginning with the fall 1979 semester. A minimum cumulative grade-point average of 2.70 is required of students admitted to doctoral programs prior to that session.

C. RESTRICTION ON STUDENTS ON PROBATION

A student on probation shall not be permitted to take comprehensive or final examinations leading to any degree or certificate, nor may the student receive any graduate degree or certificate.

D. DEPARTMENTAL REGULATIONS AND DISSEMINATION OF INFORMATION

In addition to the above University-wide requirements, departments may establish further requirements which then determine the individual student's standing with regard to probation and dismissal. To this end, each department or program shall compile a written list of standards and procedures for work in that area. These documents shall be on file in each departmental office and the office of the Graduate College dean. Copies are to be available for students in the departmental office, and departments shall make all reasonable efforts to inform students. Subsequent changes in standards or procedures shall be communicated by the department to each student and the Graduate College dean. Whenever departments revise standards for a given program, the new regulations will not apply retroactively to the disadvantage of those already in the program. In addition to notifying students that they are subject to the rules of the Graduate College as set forth in the Manual of Rules and Regulations, any standards established by the department more stringent than the general Graduate College requirements shall be stated. Information shall be provided outlining required courses applicable to the various departmental programs of study, examination procedures and other formal evaluations, departmental policies with regard to awarding and renewing assistantships, time limits on programs of study, departmental registration policies, departmental grade-point requirements, requirements for changing from one degree program to another within the department--especially from the master's to the doctor's--departmental probation and dismissal policies and procedures (see "E" following), and other matters as are appropriate. The nature of the departmental advisory system shall be explained to incoming students.

E. ACADEMIC PROGRESS, DEPARTMENTAL PROBATION, AND DISMISSAL PROCEDURES

If a student is failing to meet departmental standards, the department shall warn the student of this fact in writing. The notification shall specify in what way(s) the student is failing to meet the standards. The student shall be provided a reasonable amount of time to meet the standards prior to departmental dismissal. If conditions such as conditional admission or probation are imposed, the department shall give, at the time of its imposition, written explanation of this status and its time limits.

A student who will not be permitted to reregister for failure to meet standards shall be notified of this fact in writing with reasons for the action provided. Such dismissal may follow failure to meet conditions of admission, conditions of probation, pre-announced departmental grade-point requirements or other standards, or failure of a regularly scheduled examination or formal evaluation. If a student judges the dismissal decision improper, the student has a right to review. Each department shall establish procedures for handling such reviews. The procedures are to be approved by the Graduate College dean and shall afford a fair and expeditious review. A description of these procedures shall be included in the departmental regulations described above. (See "Section IV.D.")

F. PLAGIARISM BY GRADUATE STUDENTS

The Online Oxford English Dictionary (http://oed.com/view/Entry/144941?redirectedFrom=plagiarize#eid) defines "plagiarize" as follows, "to take and use as one's own (the thoughts, writings, or inventions of another person); to copy (literary work or ideas) improperly or without acknowledgement; (occas.) to pass off as one's own the thoughts or work of (another)." In practice, the exact definition of "plagiarize" or "plagiarism" is dependent upon the unique attributes of the creative work of a particular discipline. Thus, it is understood that different academic disciplines and cultures may have different interpretations as to the actual actions which constitute plagiarism. With this in mind, the Graduate College will operate in the following manner when a program or department discovers an act or acts of plagiarism on the part of a graduate student.

1) If the faculty members of a program or department determine that the transgression is not major, or else feel that there is a misunderstanding of the acts which constitute plagiarism, the program or department may wish to work with the student so as to prevent future occurrences of plagiarism on the part of that student. Written notification of the offense and the remediation for the offense must be sent to the Graduate College for inclusion in the student's file.

2) If the faculty members of a program or department discover an act (or acts) of plagiarism that is (are) sufficiently egregious that expulsion from the program is warranted, the student will be terminated from his or her graduate program for reasons of plagiarism. In this case, the student will be simultaneously terminated from the Graduate College of The University of Iowa. The program or department must notify the student of his or her termination in writing. All relevant facts, as well as the process for appealing the decision, must be contained in the termination letter. The Graduate College must receive a copy of the termination letter. If the graduate student resigns from the program to avoid being terminated for reasons of plagiarism, the student will be considered to have simultaneously resigned from the Graduate College. 

The appeal process for students accused of academic misconduct is specified in The University of Iowa document, "Policies and Regulations Affecting Students, C. Academic Misconduct," which states: "Questions of academic dishonesty arising within the colleges of Medicine, Law, Pharmacy, and Dentistry, and the Graduate College are treated on an individual basis." "In the Graduate College, the questions [of academic dishonesty] are handled at the departmental level. If the departmental decision is appealed, the dean may appoint an appeals committee of faculty and students from a slate of nominees prepared by the Graduate Council and the Graduate Student Senate to recommend an appropriate course of action."

The appeal process must be initiated by the student. If the student wishes to appeal the department's or program's action, that appeal must be lodged with the Senior Associate Dean for Academic Affairs of the Graduate College within 30 days of program or departmental dismissal.

G. GRADUATE COLLEGE REVIEW OF DEPARTMENTAL DISMISSAL

Questions involving judgment of performance will not be reviewed beyond the department level. If, however, the student feels there has been unfairness or some procedural irregularity concerning dismissal, the student may pursue a grievance according to the Academic Grievance Procedure (AGP) established by the Graduate College. The AGP is available in the Graduate College. The student should consult with the Graduate College prior to initiating an academic grievance.

Section V. Credits

A. TRANSFER OF GRADUATE CREDIT

Graduate work at other institutions will be entered on the student's permanent record by the Office of Admissions and a report of this action will be sent to the student and to his or her major department. Credit for these courses toward an advanced degree at Iowa must have the approval of the major department and the dean of the Graduate College. (See "Section X.E." and "Section XII.E.", Reduction of Old Credits.)

B. RESIDENCE TRANSFER CREDIT

After admission to a departmental program in the Graduate College, residence graduate credit from another Iowa Regents' university may be counted as residence credit at this institution, provided such work is acceptable to the student's major department on the basis of the department's determination of its applicability toward the degree. (See "Sections X.D." and "XII.C" for minimum semester hours required on campus for the master's and doctor's degrees, and "Sections X.E. and XII.E.", Reduction of Old Credits.)

C. GRADUATE CREDIT FOR VETERANS

Credit may be granted for studies pursued in war and military situations under such regulations as may be formulated by the national educational agencies and under such adaptation of standing rules as the Graduate Council may authorize from time to time to meet group or individual situations. The value of such credit in satisfying requirements for a degree will be determined by the major department with the approval of the dean.

D. WITHDRAWAL OF REGISTRATION AND PROPORTIONAL CREDIT FOR STUDENTS ENTERING MILITARY SERVICE

1. Students who leave within the first six weeks of the semester receive no credit.

2. Students who leave within the period of seven to nine weeks receive one-half credit.

3. Students who leave within the period of 10 to 12 weeks receive two-thirds credit.

4. Grade reports for the one-half and two-thirds credit periods: (a) Instructors report grades only as satisfactory or unsatisfactory. (b) Credit is to be assigned on the basis of total registration minus thesis and seminar. (c) Courses are to be counted toward specific degree requirements only after the student returns and then only with the department's approval.

5. Students who complete the twelfth week receive full credit.

6. Grade reports for the full-credit period: (a) Grades are to be reported only at the end of the semester. (b) Credit is to be reported in specific courses.

7. In each instance, the instructor reports the student's credit, grade, and date of withdrawal. No credit is granted unless the student's work is satisfactory at the time of leaving.

8. The amount of credit in thesis and research registration is to be reported to the registrar by individual instructors on the above basis except that less or zero credit may be assigned.

Section VI. Marking System

A. MARKS CARRYING GRADUATE CREDIT

These are A+, A, A-, B+, B, B-, C+, C, C-, and S--satisfactory.

B. MARKS CARRYING NO GRADUATE CREDIT

These are D+, D, D-, F, I--incomplete, W--withdrawn without discredit, R--registered, U--unsatisfactory, AUS--audit successful, and AUU--audit unsuccessful.

C. AUDIT

AUS is assigned when a student registered for zero credit attends as an auditor throughout the course; if the student fails to meet the instructor's auditing requirements, AUU is assigned.

D. INCOMPLETE

The grade of I is to be used only when a student's work during a session cannot be completed because of illness, accident, or other circumstances beyond the student's control. In registrations for thesis, research, or independent study, the satisfactory/unsatisfactory grades may be applied. (See next paragraph, "E".) An incomplete will automatically be converted to an F at the end of the next full semester (summer and winter sessions excluded), even if the student does not enroll after the session the I was posted.

Courses may not be repeated to remove incompletes; removal of an I is accomplished only through completion of the specific work for which the mark is given.

E. THESIS, RESEARCH, READINGS, INDEPENDENT STUDY, AND SPECIAL PROJECTS

Grades of S and U may be used for registrations in thesis, research, readings, independent study, and special projects. S--satisfactory means that the student receives credit for the work; U--unsatisfactory means that he or she receives no credit. Neither S nor U is used in computing grade-point averages. At a later date, the instructor may change the S to a letter grade. In addition, departments may ask the Graduate College dean for permission to use grades of S and U as described above for courses which, because of their special or experimental nature, are judged to be more appropriate for such grading. The type of grading system to be used in the above cases should always be mutually understood by the instructor and student.

F. GRADES OF S AND U

S and U may be used for courses taken by a graduate student outside the major department or interdepartmental degree program provided that the instructor of the course and the student's departmental advisor approve the registration. Arrangements for satisfactory/unsatisfactory grading in these courses are accomplished by filing a card with appropriate signatures in the Registrar's Office at the time of registration, or no later than the last day of the second week of a semester or the third day of the second week of a summer session. No changes from letter grades to satisfactory/unsatisfactory grades or vice versa will be allowed after these dates.

It is not the policy of the Graduate College to abandon the traditional letter grades described in this section; however, in certain exceptional instances, departments having several areas of concentration involving widely differing types of effort may request the permission of the Graduate Council to allow students majoring in one area to register in courses in another area within the same department or program on a satisfactory/unsatisfactory basis. In these instances, satisfactory/unsatisfactory cards will be used as described in the preceding paragraph.

G. COMPUTED GRADE-POINT AVERAGE

This is based only upon graduate work graded A+=4.33, A=4.00, A-=3.67, B+=3.33, B=3.00, B-=2.67, C+=2.33, C=2.00, C-=1.67, D+=1.33, D=1.00, D-=0.67, and F=0. Although a grade of A+ has a value of 4.33 in computing a student's g.p.a., the cumulative average is truncated so as not to exceed 4.00.

Section VII. Graduate Appointments

A. SCHOLARSHIPS

Scholarships are competitive and are awarded on merit.

1. Eligibility for graduate scholarships and fellowships will include but will not be exclusive to: (a) registration in the Graduate College; (b) cumulative g.p.a. of at least 3.00; (c) a satisfactory rate of progress in completing the program for the degree.

2. Preference will be given to candidates for the doctoral degree.

3. Recommendations for graduate scholarships may be made to the Graduate College by the appropriate department executive, director, or dean. A graduate scholarship may be awarded whether or not a student holds an assistantship. The amount of scholarship for the academic year may vary, but in no case exceed the comprehensive fee assessed. Scholarships will be credited to the student's University account.

B. GRADUATE COLLEGE FELLOWSHIPS

Fellowships are awarded by the Graduate College upon recommendation by departments to students with outstanding academic records. Fellows must be registered as full-time students. The primary purpose of the awards is to permit an advanced student to complete his or her dissertation or creative project and take the degree. Other terms of the award will be established by the Graduate College dean in consultation with the Graduate Council.

C. FACULTY RESEARCH ASSISTANTSHIPS

Faculty research assistantships are awarded to qualified graduate students and serve two purposes: to provide research service to professorial members of the academic staff and to provide apprenticeship experience for graduate students who are in training in research. Not more than 20 hours of service per week are required of a half-time assistant. Other part-time service is scaled in proportion, and a limited academic schedule is permitted (see "Section II.D"). Appointments ordinarily are made for the nine-month academic year, but appointments may be made for other periods of time by special arrangement. Stipends vary with the qualifications of the appointee and the amount of service rendered.

D. GRADUATE TEACHING ASSISTANTSHIPS

These assistantships serve two purposes: assistance in the instructional program of the University and the preparation of future college teachers. In order to achieve both aims, scholastically superior graduate students who show exceptional promise as teachers are selected for graduate teaching assistantships. All appointments are made by the dean of the appropriate college on recommendation of the department.

E. ELIGIBILITY FOR SCHOLARSHIPS, FELLOWSHIPS, AND RESEARCH ASSISTANTSHIPS

Scholars, fellows, and faculty research assistants on the Graduate College budget must be registered as regular students in good standing in order to hold such appointments. Appointments will be terminated when registration and/or student status is terminated. In no instance may a student be promised or tendered an appointment until after approval for admission to the Graduate College by the director of Admissions.

F. GRADUATE ASSISTANT OVERLOAD APPOINTMENTS

Overload graduate assistantship appointments (those more than 20 hours/week) will be granted only when there is a clear case to be made beyond the student's monetary gain or the benefit to the department.

Before making a graduate assistantship appointment that brings a student's total appointment beyond 50%, the DEO or DGS of the program in which the student is enrolled (in consultation with the student's advisor) must receive permission from the Associate Dean for Student and Administrative Affairs.  All overload requests must address:  (1) the potential academic benefit to the student from the additional appointment; (2) the student's current progress towards degree completion; and (3) the effect of the additional appointment on the student's future progress.

A total appointment of more than 62.5% should be seen as an exceptional situation and will be granted to a maximum of 75% only for one semester during the entire time of a student's graduate studies.

Before submitting an overload appointment request, the DEO or DGS must confirm that course registration for the semester does not exceed limits specified in "Section II.D." of this manual for the specific level of appointment.

Upon approval, international students must contact OISS and gain permission for Curricular Practical Training (CPT).

This policy applies only to teaching assistantships and research assistantships during the regular academic year.  The DEO or DGS should make their graduate students aware of this policy during the department/program's fall orientation.

G. LOANS

Graduate students requiring financial assistance may apply for loans at the Office of Student Financial Aid.

H. OTHER FORMS OF SUPPORT

Many departments offer financial assistance in the form of traineeships, part-time employment on research programs, or part-time teaching. Inquiries should be addressed directly to the major department.

Section VIII. Advanced Programs Offered in the Graduate College

The major areas in which the Graduate College offers degree programs are listed under "Degree Programs" at the beginning of this section of the Catalog.

Section IX. General Requirements for Advanced Degrees

A. APPLICATION FOR DEGREE

The student must file an application for an anticipated degree with the registrar by the deadline date printed in the Graduate College academic calendar for the session in which the degree will be conferred. The student must have the application signed by his or her advisor. Failure to file the application by the deadline date established by the Graduate College dean will result in postponement of graduation to a subsequent session.

B. ENROLLMENT IN FINAL SESSION

The student must be enrolled during the session in which the degree is to be conferred. Students who are away from the University campus during that session may meet this requirement by registering for independent study, research, or thesis hours according to the practice in the various departments. Doctoral candidates who have completed all work except the final examination may register for Doctoral Final Registration described in "Section XII.L" if such registration is appropriate. Master's candidates who have completed all work except the final examination may register for Master's Final Registration if such registration is appropriate. Both the Doctoral Final Registration and Master's Final Registration require a 2 s.h. tuition/fee payment, and may be repeated if the degree requirements are not completed in this session. Registration in a course for which tuition/fees are not assessed (Cooperative Education Internship, for example) will not satisfy this requirement.

Section X. Master's Degrees

A. KINDS OF DEGREES

The University of Iowa offers programs leading to the Master of Arts (M.A.) degree, Master of Science (M.S.) degree, and several professional master's degrees.

M.A. and M.S. degrees require mastery of methodologies and practices of research and scholarship of the discipline. A thesis describing original scholarship or research may be required. M.A./M.S. degrees may be designed either as preparation for entry into doctoral degree programs or to provide advanced study and accomplishment that serves a variety of career and other purposes. Degrees are awarded in many fields of study, or majors, consistent with conventions of the discipline (e.g., M.A. in Art, English, Psychology; M.S. in Chemistry, Mathematics, Microbiology). (For complete list, see Section VIII.) M.A. and M.S. degrees require a minimum of 30 s.h., a final examination and, in some fields, a thesis.

Professional master's degrees provide knowledge, perspectives, and skills required for professional practice. Some programs may include introduction to research or scholarship sufficient to allow application of current literature to practice. Professional master's degrees generally are indicated by a three- or four-letter designation; examples include the Master of Fine Arts (M.F.A.), Master of Social Work (M.S.W.), Master of Public Health (M.P.H.), Master of Science in Nursing (M.S.N.), Master of Accountancy (M.Ac.). (For complete list, see Section VIII.) Professional master's degrees require a minimum of 30 s.h. Some may require a final examination as well as a thesis, papers, projects, colloquia, internships, or other experiential-based activity typical of preparation for practice in the field.

A student may prepare a proposal for an interdisciplinary course of study, including the plan of study defining course work, examination requirements, a research plan, and a committee of at least three faculty members, with either the department most directly concerned or the Graduate College designated as the sponsor. Final approval of such individual programs is granted by the Graduate College dean, who may add members to the student's supervising committee from other closely related departmental faculties or from the Graduate Council. The degree will be awarded in interdisciplinary studies (master's) stipulated in the approved graduate program and, parenthetically, the name of the sponsoring department.

B. PLAN OF STUDY

The applicant for a master's degree must file a plan of study approved by the advisor and the departmental executive with the Graduate College within the session in which the degree is to be granted and by the deadline date printed in the Graduate College academic calendar. If the session in which a student takes his or her final exam is earlier than the session in which the degree is to be granted, the Plan of Study must be filed prior to the administration of the student's final examination. The plan shall meet the requirements for the degree approved by the graduate faculty. (See also "Section IV.D. Departmental Regulations and Dissemination of Information.")

C. MAJOR AND RELATED FIELDS

The plan of study should provide for reasonable concentration in the major field of interest and, subject to the approval of the major department, may include related subjects from other departments.

D. ACADEMIC RESIDENCE REQUIREMENT

Of the minimum of 30 s.h. required for the degree, at least 24 s.h. must be completed under the auspices of The University of Iowa after admission to a graduate department/program. Various forms of extramural registration may qualify toward fulfillment of the aforementioned 24-hour residence requirement (see "Section II.G. Extramural Registration") in addition to regular on-campus registration. Students who have elected or who are required to write a thesis for conferral of their master's degrees, must complete at least 8 semester hours of the 24-hour, academic residence requirement on campus. At the discretion of the department, the 8-semester hour, on-campus requirement may be waived for nonthesis master's programs. Election of the waiver option is to be applied programmatically, and not on a student-by-student basis, and must be formally conveyed to the Graduate College.

E. REDUCTION OF OLD CREDITS

Courses taken ten or more years prior to the session in which the master's degree is to be conferred must be evaluated by the major department in order to determine the possible use of these credit hours within a student's plan of study. The department, in turn, must send a letter of petition to the Graduate College, requesting the use of any or all of these credits toward the fulfillment of degree requirements.

F. LIMIT ON PROFESSIONAL COURSES

Work taken by a student in the Colleges of Dentistry, Law, or Medicine while enrolled for a professional degree may be credited to a graduate program leading to a master's degree if it is taken after the student has earned a bachelor's degree or has completed work equivalent to that required for a bachelor's degree at The University of Iowa. The work accepted from the professional college must be directly related to the student's major field of study in the Graduate College and be approved as a part of the plan of study by the student's advisor and the major department. Work completed while registered for a professional degree in law, medicine, or dentistry will be counted as part of the residence requirement for nondoctoral degrees in the Graduate College only when the student is registered in an appropriate joint degree program.

G. TWO MASTER'S DEGREES

The granting by this university of two master's degrees simultaneously or in succession requires that all of the requirements for each degree be satisfied separately. That is, the student must pass two final examinations, write two theses (if each program requires a thesis), and satisfy the Graduate College residency requirement for each degree separately. A minimum combined total of 60 s.h. of graduate credit must be achieved at the time that the second degree is conferred.

Some credit can be shared when one master's degree requires, or both master's degrees require, more than 30 s.h. of graduate credit. No more than one-fourth of the credit necessary for one degree may be composed of course work taken for the other degree, and there must still be a minimum combined total of 60 s.h. of graduate credit.

The directors of graduate study for the two programs, or the department heads of the departments housing the programs, must exchange letters in which they convey each program's approval of the student pursuing the two degrees. Copies of these letters must be sent to the Graduate College. 

H. MASTER'S DEGREE WITH THESIS

Not more than 9 s.h. of credit for thesis research and writing shall be counted in satisfying the 30 s.h. minimum requirement. The thesis may be a scholarly study or an artistic production.

Beginning with the Fall 2009 Semester all master's theses, excluding MFA theses, must be submitted to the Graduate College in electronic format.  MFA students will have the option of submitting hard-copy or electronic theses.

The first deposit of a thesis (an ETD or one hard copy of the MFA thesis), complete and in final typed form, must be presented to the Graduate College for a check of formal characteristics by the first-deposit deadline date in the session in which the degree is to be conferred.  After approval by the Graduate College and by the thesis committee, the final deposit of the thesis (an ETD or two, identical hard copies of the MFA thesis) must be deposited with the Graduate College by the final deposit deadline date in the student's graduation session.  Failure to submit the first and final deposits of the thesis by the deadline dates established by the Graduate College will result in the postponement of graduation to a future session. [For detailed submission and formatting requirements, see Theses & Dissertations under Policies & Deadlines on the Graduate College web site.]

Nonrefundable fees are charged each thesis candidate to cover processing and publication costs of the thesis.

The thesis committee shall consist of at least three members of the graduate faculty and may or may not be identical to the final examination committee. (The final examination committee for the master's degree shall consist of at least three members of the graduate faculty, at least two of whom are from the major department or program, and are members of The University of Iowa tenure-track faculty. See "X.K. Examining Committee.")

I. MASTER'S DEGREE WITHOUT THESIS

A master's degree without thesis, consisting of at least 30 s.h. of graduate work, may be awarded upon the completion of a curriculum prescribed by a department and approved by the Graduate Council.

J. FINAL EXAMINATION

The requirements for master's degrees may include a final examination which, at the discretion of the major department, may be written or oral or both. Such an examination will not duplicate course examinations. It will be evaluated by the examining committee as satisfactory or unsatisfactory, with two unsatisfactory votes making the committee report unsatisfactory. The report of the final examination is due in the Graduate College not later than 48 hours after the examination, and by the deadline date established by the Graduate College.

If the department so recommends, a candidate who fails the examination may present himself or herself for reexamination, but not sooner than the next regularly scheduled examination period in the following session.

The examination may be repeated only once.

A student must graduate within one calendar year after passing the final examination for a master's degree; failure to meet this deadline will require reexamination of the student.

Upon recommendation of a department, the comprehensive examination for a doctoral degree may be substituted for the master's examination.

Some master's programs do not require a final exam. Students are responsible for checking the specific requirements of their individual degree programs.

K. EXAMINING COMMITTEE

The examining committee for the master's degree consists of at least three members of the Graduate Faculty appointed by the dean upon recommendation of the major department or program.  These committees are composed as follows:

At least two of the faculty members must be members of The University of Iowa tenure-track faculty.

At least two of the faculty members are from the major department or program (defined as faculty members who hold any appointment in the major department or program), and are members of The University of Iowa tenure-track faculty. 

A department or program may impose additional structure on the composition of its examining committees.

Departments and programs may request the dean's permission to replace one of the three members of the Graduate Faculty by a recognized scholar of professorial rank from another academic institution. Also, a voting member may be added at the discretion of the Graduate College Dean.

Section XI. Graduate Certificate Programs

Graduate certificate programs reflect specialization, either within a field or in an area of study, research, or training. Some graduate certificate programs may be open only to students seeking degrees in related fields; others may be offered as independent programs. Graduate certificate programs are designed to enhance skills, to provide professional development and career advancement opportunities, to broaden career options, and for other purposes, both for traditional, full-time students and for those with full-time employment.

Graduate certificate programs usually require a minimum of 15 s.h. of specified course work and may, in addition, require papers, projects, or experiential learning components designed for specific cohorts. Certificate programs generally require two to three semesters to complete.

Examples include the graduate certificates in aging studies, American Indian and native studies, informatics, and advanced nurse practitioner. Requirements for each graduate certificate are included in The University of Iowa General Catalog.

Section XII. Doctor's Degrees

A. CHARACTER OF DEGREE

The Graduate College offers doctoral programs leading to the Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.), the highest degree awarded by the university; the Doctor of Musical Arts (D.M.A.); the professional Doctor of Physical Therapy (D.P.T.); the professional Doctor of Audiology (Au.D.); and the professional Doctor of Nursing Practice (D.N.P.). The Doctor of Philosophy degree indicates marked excellence in original research or other creative work, and superior comprehension in the discipline. The Doctor of Musical Arts degree indicates marked excellence in performance and pedagogy. The Doctor of Physical Therapy degree indicates marked excellence in physical therapy differential diagnosis and clinical integration. The Doctor of Audiology degree indicates marked excellence in theoretical and advanced clinical skills. The Doctor of Nursing Practice degree indicates marked excellence in clinical practice and the application of clinical theory in the classroom and administrative venues.

B. PREREQUISITES

The candidate must present evidence of having completed a satisfactory amount of undergraduate work in the subject proposed for investigation or, in the case of deficiency, must register for prerequisite courses.

C. RESIDENCE REQUIREMENT

The Ph.D. is granted primarily on the basis of achievement rather than on the accumulation of semester hours of credit; however, the candidate is expected to have completed at least three years of residence in a graduate college. At least part of this residence must be spent in full-time involvement in one's discipline, at this university, beyond the first 24 s.h. of graduate work; this requirement can be met either by: (1) enrollment as a full-time student (9 s.h. minimum) in each of two semesters; or (2) enrollment for a minimum of 6 s.h. in each of three semesters during which the student holds at least a one-quarter-time assistantship certified by the department as contributing to the student's doctoral program. (For purposes of record and assessment of fees, student registration should reflect accurately the amount and kind of work undertaken in the Graduate College. All doctoral programs, including acceptable transfer credit, will contain a minimum of 72 s.h. of graduate work.)

D. INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES PROGRAMS

A student may prepare a proposal for an interdisciplinary course of study, including the plan of study defining course work, examination requirements, research plan, and a committee of at least five faculty members with either the department most directly concerned or the Graduate College, designated as the sponsor. Final approval of such individual programs is granted by the Graduate College dean, who may add members to the student's supervising committee from other closely related departmental faculties or from the Graduate Council. The degree will be awarded in interdisciplinary studies (doctorate) stipulated in the approved graduate program and, parenthetically, the name of the sponsoring department.

E. REDUCTION OF OLD CREDITS

Courses taken 10 or more years prior to the doctoral comprehensive examination must be evaluated by the major department in order to determine the possible use of these credit hours within a student's plan of study. The department, in turn, must send a letter of petition to the Graduate College, requesting the use of any or all of these credits toward the fulfillment of degree requirements.

F. LIMIT ON PROFESSIONAL COURSES

Work taken by a student in the Colleges of Dentistry, Law, or Medicine while enrolled for a professional degree may be credited to a graduate program leading to a doctoral degree if it is taken after the student has earned a bachelor's degree or has completed work equivalent to that required for a bachelor's degree at The University of Iowa. The work accepted from the professional colleges must be directly related to the student's major field of study in the Graduate College, and the plan of study must be approved by the student's advisor and the major department. Work completed while registered for a professional degree in law, medicine, or dentistry will be counted as part of the one academic year which must be spent in residence as a doctoral student only when the student is registered in a formally established joint degree program.

G. JOINT PROGRAM FOR MASTER'S AND DOCTORAL DEGREES

Those students who expect to continue their training through the doctoral degree may pursue a joint program for the master's and doctor's degrees. The master's examination may be combined with the comprehensive examination for the doctorate for these candidates. The examining committee will file separate reports of its actions on the final examination for the master's degree and for the comprehensive examination. Upon recommendation of the department and approval of the Graduate College dean, students who are well qualified by previous training may submit a plan of study that leads directly to the doctoral degree without earning the master's degree as an intervening part.

H. REQUIREMENT IN FOREIGN LANGUAGES

There is no general Graduate College requirement in foreign languages. Those departments that do require competence in one or more foreign languages establish standards as to the extent and level of competence, as well as methods of testing. Specific requirements will be found in the departmental statements of standards and procedures (see "Section IV.D.").

Specifications of departmental requirements in foreign languages are filed in the Graduate College office and may be changed upon the initiative of the departments.

I. REQUIREMENTS FOR THE DOCTOR OF PHYSICAL THERAPY (D.P.T.), THE DOCTOR OF AUDIOLOGY (AU.D.), AND THE DOCTOR OF NURSING PRACTICE (D.N.P.)

Students enrolled in professional D.P.T., D.N.P., and Au.D. programs do not take comprehensive and final examinations and do not deposit a thesis with the Graduate College. The departments will be required to submit a doctoral plan of study to the Graduate College during the session of degree conferral. The plan will provide a listing of all graduate courses taken that apply toward the degree and a listing of courses in progress. The plan is to be filed no later than the deadline date printed in the Graduate College academic calendar.

J. PLAN OF STUDY

The development of a plan of study at the doctoral level is the responsibility of the student working together with his or her advisor. A formal plan of study must accompany the departmental request to the Graduate College for permission to conduct the comprehensive examination. The plan will provide a listing of all graduate courses taken that apply toward the degree and a listing of courses in progress or to be completed after the comprehensive examination.

K. COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION

The candidate must satisfactorily complete a comprehensive examination, consisting of written or oral parts or both at the discretion of the major department. Admission to the comprehensive examination is granted upon the recommendation of the major department, the filing of the plan of study, and the approval of the dean of the Graduate College. A student must be registered in the Graduate College at the time of the comprehensive examination, which must be satisfactorily completed not later than the session prior to the session of graduation. This examination, administered only on campus, is intended to be an inclusive evaluation of the candidate's mastery of the major and related fields of study, including the tools of research in which competence has been certified.

The comprehensive examination is not a deferred qualifying examination. It is intended to evaluate the candidate's mastery of the subject at or near the end of his or her formal preparation and prior to the completion of the dissertation. The comprehensive examination and the final examination, which is concerned chiefly with defense of the thesis and related subjects, are the two principal examinations for the Ph.D. and D.M.A. doctoral degrees.

The comprehensive examination will be evaluated by a convened meeting of the committee. Each committee member will sign the examination report as satisfactory, reservations, or unsatisfactory. The completed exam warrant will be submitted to the Graduate College office within 14 days after the completion of the examination. Two "unsatisfactory" votes will make the committee report unsatisfactory.

A vote of "reservations" should only be used when a faculty member feels that the deficiencies displayed by the student were modest, and can be readily rectified. In the event of a report with two or more votes of "reservations," the actions required of the student, by the committee, that are necessary to correct the deficiencies must be recorded and submitted to the Graduate College with the examination report form. Copies of the written statement of necessary actions should be kept by: the appropriate departmental executive, the chair of the examination committee, and the student. The statement must specify the time allowed for completion of the aforementioned actions. The language describing the actions must be specific. For instance, if additional course work is required, a list of suitable courses must be presented. If the candidate needs to rewrite his or her research prospectus, the deficient areas must be identified, etc. If the candidate satisfies the required actions in the specified period of time, the appropriate departmental executive will send a written report to the Graduate College indicating the date for which the examining committee considers the actions to have been satisfied. Upon approval of the dean of the Graduate College, the comprehensive exam will be recorded as "satisfactory" as of that date. If the actions are not satisfied on time, or if the actions are not of sufficient quality, the appropriate departmental executive will send a written report to the Graduate College indicating that fact. Upon approval of the dean of the Graduate College, the comprehensive exam will be recorded as "unsatisfactory" as of that date. The candidate will not be admitted to the final oral examination of the dissertation until a grade of "satisfactory" has been recorded for the comprehensive exam.

In case of a report of unsatisfactory on a comprehensive examination, the committee may grant the candidate permission to present himself or herself for reexamination not sooner than four months after the first examination. The examination may be repeated only once, at the option of the department.

L. CONTINUOUS REGISTRATION AFTER COMPLETION OF THE COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION

The student is required to register each fall and spring semester after satisfactorily completing the comprehensive examination until the degree is awarded. If a student fails to register, the student may not be readmitted to candidacy until the student has submitted an application that has been approved by the student's advisor, the departmental executive, and the Graduate College dean.

In order to maintain continuous registration, doctoral students may register (1) for required and/or elective courses, research, and thesis hours to complete the plan of study, or (2) for Doctoral Continuous Registration (DCR). DCR requires a 2 s.h. tuition/fee payment. If a temporary lapse in a student's academic program is required due to military service, medical leave, maternity leave, or personal/family leave, a student may petition the Graduate College to be allowed to register for Ph.D. Postcomprehensive Registration (PCR), which allows for the assessment of a special minimum fee. If a petition is granted, it is to be understood that a student will not make significant use of university resources, or engage in significant consultation with the faculty. In the final semester, doctoral students may register for Doctoral Final Registration (DFR), which requires a 2 s.h. tuition/fee payment, or appropriate course work. The DFR may be repeated if the degree requirements are not completed in this session.

Under no circumstances may courses for which tuition/fees are not assessed (Cooperative Education Internship, for example), be used to satisfy the continuous registration or final registration requirement of the Graduate College.

No registration for the summer or winter sessions is required. The exceptions are when the student is taking a degree at the end of the summer session, or when enrollment is required by the student's department.

M. DISSERTATION FOR THE DOCTORAL DEGREE

Beginning with the Fall 2009 Semester all doctoral theses must be submitted to the Graduate College in electronic format.

The student's dissertation, complete and in final form, must be presented in ETD (electronic thesis/dissertation) format at the office of the Graduate College by the first-deposit deadline date in the session in which the degree is to be conferred. The final deposit of the approved ETD must be deposited at the office by the appropriate deadline date in the student's graduation semester.  The final deposit can be no later than the end of the semester (summers excluded) following the session in which the final examination is passed; failure to meet this deadline will require reexamination of the student.  Failure to submit the first and final deposits of the dissertation by the deadline dates established by the Graduate College will result in the postponement of graduation to a future session.  [For detailed submission and formatting requirements, see Theses & Dissertations under Policies & Deadlines on the Graduate College web site.]

Regulations regarding preparation of the dissertation shall be promulgated by the dean of the Graduate College. An external abstract of the dissertation, not to exceed two, double-spaced pages (text and approval lines), is to be deposited with the dissertation. The abstract must be approved and signed by the dissertation advisor. Approved ETDs will be forwarded to ProQuest for microfilming and digital archiving; the doctoral abstracts will be published in Dissertation Abstracts International. The PDF format of all electronic submissions will be forwarded by ProQuest to The University of Iowa Libraries, where they will be catalogued and made available for public use.

Dissertations shall be made available to all members of the examining committee not later than two weeks before the date of the examination.

N. DISSERTATION FEES

Nonrefundable fees are charged each doctoral candidate to cover processing and publication costs of the dissertation and abstract.

O. FINAL EXAMINATION

The work for the degree culminates in a final oral examination administered on campus. This examination should include: a critical inquiry into the purposes, methods, and results of the investigation--not a mere recapitulation of the procedures followed--and intensive questioning on areas of knowledge constituting the immediate context of the investigation.

The final examination may not be held until the next session after the student satisfactorily completes the comprehensive examination; however, a student must pass the final examination no later than five years after satisfactorily completing the comprehensive examination. Failure to meet this deadline will result in a reexamination of the student to determine his or her qualifications for taking the final examination. The procedures to be followed are the same as those for the comprehensive examination. (See "XII.K. Comprehensive Examination.")

Final examinations for the doctorate are open to the public. Members of the faculty of the Graduate College are especially invited to attend and, subject to the approval of the chair, to participate in the examination.

The report of the final examination is due in the Graduate College office not later than 48 hours after the examination. The final examination will be evaluated as satisfactory or unsatisfactory. Two unsatisfactory votes will make the committee report unsatisfactory. In case of a report of unsatisfactory in the final examination, the candidate may not present himself or herself for reexamination until the next session. The examination may be repeated only once, at the option of the major department.

P. EXAMINING COMMITTEES

The Graduate College encourages departments and programs to construct Ph.D. examining committees which are comprised of faculty members with varying, but related, areas of expertise. 

The comprehensive and final examinations are conducted by committees of no fewer than five members of the Graduate Faculty appointed by the dean upon recommendation of the major department or program. These committees are composed as follows:

At least four of the faculty members must be members of The University of Iowa tenure-track faculty.

At least two of the faculty members are from the major department or program (defined as faculty members who hold any appointment in the major department or program), and are members of The University of Iowa tenure-track faculty. 

A department or program may impose additional structure on the composition of its examining committees.

Departments and programs may request the dean’s permission to replace one of the five members of the Graduate Faculty by a recognized scholar of professorial rank from another academic institution. Also, a voting member may be added at the discretion of the Graduate College Dean.

Section XIII. Exceptions

Petitions to waive these regulations may be made for appropriate and justifiable reasons on behalf of any graduate student through the departmental executive to the dean and the Graduate Council.

Nondepartmental Courses

Most Graduate College courses are offered by the college's programs and schools. They are listed and described in the corresponding General Catalog sections; see the links under "Index: Academic Programs" toward the top of this page.

The college also offers the following nondepartmental courses.

000:000 (GRAD:6000) Ph.D. Postcomprehensive Registration0 s.h.
 
000:001 (GRAD:6001) Master's Final Registration0 s.h.
Requirements: master's degree candidate.
 
000:002 (GRAD:6002) Doctoral Continuous Registration0 s.h.
Requirements: doctoral degree candidate who has passed comprehensive examinations.
 
000:003 (GRAD:6003) Doctoral Final Registration0 s.h.
Requirements: doctoral degree candidate in final session of enrollment.
 
000:008 (GRAD:0008) CIC Scholar Nongraduate Levelarr.
 
000:800 (GRAD:6800) CIC Scholararr.
 
000:801 (GRAD:6801) Regents Exchange Programarr.
 
000:997 (GRAD:6997) Graduate/Professional Transferarr.
 
000:998 (GRAD:6998) Undergraduate Transferarr.
 
000:999 (GRAD:6999) Resident/Fellow/Post-Doctoral0 s.h.
 
650:006 (GRAD:0006) SROP/McNair Scholars Program0 s.h.
 
650:030 (GRAD:3030) SROP/McNair Scholars Academic Development for Juniors0-1 s.h.
Training and mentorship opportunities to enhance academic and professional success; academic preparation (including the GRE) and exploration of doctoral graduate training programs; seminars, interactive workshops, readings, written assignments. Requirements: UI SROP/McNair Scholar and junior standing.
 
650:040 (GRAD:3040) SROP/McNair Scholars Academic Development for Seniors0-1 s.h.
Training and mentorship opportunities to enhance academic and professional success; academic preparation and professional development to navigate the graduate admissions process (including preparation of personal statements, selection of referees, mock interviews); seminars, interactive workshops, readings, written assignments. Requirements: UI SROP/McNair Scholar and senior standing.
 
650:217 (GRAD:6217) Seminar in College Teaching1-3 s.h.
Preparation for college teaching; for graduate students planning to teach. Same as 07P:217 (PSQF:6217).
 
650:270 (GRAD:7270) Principles of Scholarly Integrity0-1 s.h.
Training in the responsible conduct of research and scholarly activities; discussion of case studies—student/mentor responsibilities in the pursuit of scholarly work (ownership, authorship, plagiarism/falsification/fabrication of data); student/mentor relationships and intellectual dialogues (communication, collaboration, grievance management); student responsibilities to the institution/scholarly community/society (intellectual property, conflict of interest, fiscal responsibilities, human/animal subjects). Requirements: enrollment in Graduate College degree‑seeking program. Recommendations: first‑year graduate standing (Ph.D., M.S./M.A.) and involvement in conducting NSF/NIH‑funded research.
 
650:275 (GRAD:7275) OGEI Topical Seminar: Professional Sustainability in Graduate School1 s.h.
Skill development and sustainability plan; professional literature, guest speakers.
 
650:280 (GRAD:7280) Obermann Center for Advanced Studies Special Topics Seminars1-3 s.h.
Active participation and engagement in a major program, such as the annual Humanities Symposium; readings on interdisciplinary histories, contexts, and theoretical perspectives that frame featured events; work of artists, scholars, and researchers participating in the program. Requirements: admission to Graduate College.
 
650:285 (GRAD:7285) Obermann Center Professional Development Seminar1 s.h.
Active participation and engagement in a series of classes dedicated to connecting public engagement, research, and teaching; readings and media viewings that frame course topics; production of a short film, marketing materials, grant, and syllabi relevant to public engagement project. Requirements: admission to Graduate College and completion of Obermann Graduate Institute on Engagement and the Academy.
 
650:300 (GRAD:6300) Writing for Learned Journals1-4 s.h.
Help for graduate students in bringing written work to publishable form; analysis of target journals' audiences and interests; submission, response to criticism. Same as 160:300 (PORO:6300).
 
650:313 (GRAD:6313) Digital Rhetorics3 s.h.
Current discourse (utopic, dystopic, other strands) about the Internet as it shapes and is shaped by competing forces. Same as 160:313 (PORO:6313).
 
650:380 (GRAD:7400) Practicum in College Teachingarr.
Supervised college teaching experience; teaching in collaboration with faculty, observation and critiques of teaching, participation in course planning and evaluation procedures; ethical and multicultural considerations. Requirements: admission to the graduate certificate in college teaching program.
 
650:385 (GRAD:7385) Teaching and Learning in Higher Education3 s.h.
Current theoretical and empirical literature on teaching and learning in higher education; focus on development of effective teaching practice. Same as 07P:385 (PSQF:7385), 07B:385 (EPLS:7385), 07S:384 (EDTL:7385), 07C:385 (RCE:7385).
 
650:601 (GRAD:7601) Postdoctoral Research Scholar0 s.h.
Requirements: postdoctoral standing.
 
650:602 (GRAD:7602) Postdoctoral Research Fellow0 s.h.
Requirements: postdoctoral standing.
 
650:604 (GRAD:7604) Principles of Scholarly Integrity0 s.h.
Training in the responsible conduct of research and scholarly activities; discussion of case studies—student/mentor responsibilities for the pursuit of scholarly work (ownership, authorship, plagiarism/falsification/fabrication of data); student/mentor relationships and intellectual dialogues (communication, collaboration, grievance management); student responsibilities to the institution/scholarly community/society (intellectual property, conflict of interest, fiscal responsibilities, human/animal subjects). Requirements: postdoctoral standing. Recommendations: first‑year postdoctoral scholar/fellow (FP01/FP02) conducting NSF/NIH‑funded research.
 
650:605 (GRAD:7605) Writing for Learned Journals0 s.h.
Help for graduate students in bringing written work to publishable form; analysis of target journals' rhetoric; submission, response to criticism. Requirements: postdoctoral standing.
 
650:614 (GRAD:7614) Principles of Scholarly Integrity0 s.h.
Training in the responsible conduct of research (RCR) and scholarly activities; discussion of case studies—student/mentor responsibilities in the pursuit of scholarly work (ownership; authorship; plagiarism/falsification/fabrication of data); student/mentor relationships and intellectual dialogues (communication, collaboration, grievance management); student responsibilities to the institution/scholarly community/society (intellectual property, conflict of interest, fiscal responsibilities, human/animal subjects); may meet the RCR training obligation of the K award. Requirements: junior faculty member holding a federally‑funded NIH individual K award.