Search

Rehabilitation and Counselor Education

Chair

  • Vilia Tarvydas
Undergraduate minor: human relations
Graduate degrees: M.A.in rehabilitation and counselor education; Ph.D. in rehabilitation and counselor education
Faculty: http://www.education.uiowa.edu/rce/people
Web site: http://www.education.uiowa.edu/rce

The Department of Rehabilitation and Counselor Education prepares students to facilitate human development across the life span, to advocate for clients and students, and to serve local, national, and international communities through the delivery and creation of state-of-the-art counseling services. The department achieves these goals by advancing knowledge, skills, and attitudes appropriate for effective and ethical professional counseling practice and by conducting and disseminating related research.

The department prepares practitioners and scholars primarily at the graduate level, through degree programs in counselor education and supervision, couple and family counseling, rehabilitation and mental health counseling, rehabilitation counselor education, and school counseling. It also offers basic courses in interviewing and interpersonal skills for students in other professional and graduate programs. In addition, it offers an undergraduate minor in human relations.

Undergraduate Program of Study

  • Minor in human relations

Minor

The minor in human relations is open to all University of Iowa students enrolled in undergraduate degree programs.

The minor in human relations requires a minimum of 15 s.h. of credit, including 12 s.h. earned at the University of Iowa and 12 s.h. earned in courses numbered 3000 or above. Students must maintain a g.p.a. of at least 2.50 in all courses for the minor and in all UI courses for the minor. Course work in the minor may not be taken pass/nonpass, but may count toward the minor if offered as S/U or S/F. Transfer credit must be approved by the chair of the Department of Rehabilitation and Counselor Education in order to count toward the minor.

The minor in human relations requires the following course work.

This course:

RCE:4199 Counseling for Related Professions3 s.h.

At least 12 s.h. chosen from these:

RCE:2081 Making a Vocational-Educational Choice2-3 s.h.
RCE:4110 Psychology of Food and Mood3 s.h.
RCE:4111 Relationships and Workplace Dynamics: Keys to a Successful Career3 s.h.
RCE:4130 Human Sexuality3 s.h.
RCE:4131 Loss, Death, and Bereavement3 s.h.
RCE:4132 Introduction to Addictions and Impulse Control Disorders3 s.h.
RCE:4137 Introduction to Educating Gifted Students3 s.h.
RCE:4140 Foundations of Leadership for Community Agencies3 s.h.
RCE:4145 Marriage and Family Interaction3 s.h.
RCE:4162 Introduction to Couple and Family Therapy3 s.h.
RCE:4173 Trauma Across the Lifespan3 s.h.
RCE:4174 Positive Psychology3 s.h.
RCE:4175 Motivational Interviewing3 s.h.
RCE:4176 Child Abuse: Assessment, Intervention, and Advocacy3 s.h.
RCE:4177 Life After Service: Veterans in College3 s.h.
RCE:4178 Microcounseling1-3 s.h.
RCE:4179 Sexuality Within the Helping Professions3 s.h.
RCE:4180 Topical Seminar for Helping Professionals3 s.h.
RCE:4185 Introduction to Substance Abuse3 s.h.
RCE:4187 Introduction to Assistive Technology3 s.h.
RCE:4190 Group Processes for Related Professions3 s.h.
RCE:4191 Advocacy: Awareness, Assertiveness, and Activismarr.
RCE:4192 Group Leadership in Human Sexuality0-3 s.h.
RCE:4193 Individual Instruction—Undergraduatearr.
RCE:4194 Interpersonal Effectiveness3 s.h.
RCE:4195 Ethics in Human Relations and Counseling3 s.h.
RCE:4197 Citizenship in a Multicultural Society3 s.h.
EALL:4130 Introduction to Grant Writing3 s.h.
EPLS:4150 Leadership and Public Service I3 s.h.
EPLS:4151 Leadership and Public Service II2 s.h.
EPLS:4180 Human Relations for the Classroom Teacher (requires special permission for students not enrolled in TEP)3 s.h.
PSQF:1027 Mindfulness Foundations in the Helping Professions3 s.h.
PSQF:2115 Introduction to Counseling Psychology3 s.h.
PSQF:2116 Applied Child and Adolescent Psychology3 s.h.

Contact the Department of Rehabilitation and Counselor Education for more information about the minor.

Graduate Programs of Study

  • Master of Arts in rehabilitation and counselor education
  • Doctor of Philosophy in rehabilitation and counselor education

The department offers graduate degree programs in five major areas within rehabilitation and counselor education:

Counselor education and supervision (offered in the Ph.D.);
Couple and family therapy (offered in the Ph.D.);
Rehabilitation and mental health counseling (offered in the M.A.);
Rehabilitation counselor education (offered in the Ph.D.); and
School counseling (offered in the M.A.).

Each degree program is described below.

Upon completing a degree in the department, students are evaluated and are expected to have awareness, knowledge, and skills in the following areas:

  • current definitions, professional standards, and appropriate professional practices regarding multiculturalism;
  • what it means to be a multiculturally competent helping professional;
  • integration of feedback into practice and professionalism in interpersonal interactions;
  • personal limitations and strengths that could ultimately support or harm a client or student;
  • a personal plan for future practice in the field regarding multicultural relationships.

Prospective students must meet admission requirements for the individual programs as well as the department's general admission requirements (see "Admission" toward the end of this section). Criminal background checks may be required. Applicants also must meet the admission requirements of the Graduate College; see the Manual of Rules and Regulations of the Graduate College.

Ph.D.: Counselor Education and Supervision

The Doctor of Philosophy program in counselor education and supervision (CES) requires 96 s.h. of graduate credit. The program provides students with knowledge and skills related to general counseling (including mental health and school counseling), teaching, consulting, supervising counselors, and conducting research. Graduates enter professional work as counselors, counselor supervisors, counselor educators, researchers and/or consultants, or work in other positions requiring expertise in human relations. Students may choose an emphasis in an area agreed upon by faculty advisors.

Counselor education and supervision graduates are prepared to teach the knowledge and skills required of professional counselors and to supervise beginning and advanced counselors, perform counseling interventions with individuals and groups, and teach human relations skills in colleges or universities. They provide professional consultation with counseling practitioners, educators, and policy makers about counseling program development and evaluation. They also may perform research that contributes to knowledge about counseling, supervision, and counselor education.

The program is accredited by the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP). The American Counseling Association (ACA) and the Association for Counselor Education and Supervision (ACES) are the professional organizations most related to program activities.

The Ph.D. curriculum includes required courses in counseling and in research tools and applications, a minor outside the department, and a dissertation.

Most students complete their course work in three years and take a fourth year to complete the dissertation. Students who have not completed a master's degree program approved by the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP) may need to remedy deficiencies by taking appropriate course work at the master's degree level.

The Ph.D. program in counselor education and supervision requires the following work.

REQUIRED COURSES

All of these:

RCE:7255 Advanced Career Development and Counseling (or equivalent)3 s.h.
RCE:7347 Home/School/Community: System Interventions3 s.h.
RCE:7353 Advanced Counseling and Psychotherapy3 s.h.
RCE:7357 Advanced Group Counseling and Psychotherapy3 s.h.
RCE:7360 Advanced Practicum in Counseling (section 2)3 s.h.
RCE:7380 Practicum in College Teaching3 s.h.
RCE:7385 Teaching and Learning in Higher Education3 s.h.
RCE:7400 Seminar: Ethics and Issues in Counseling3 s.h.
RCE:7448 Integrated Developmental Theory and Counseling3 s.h.
RCE:7451 Advanced Multiculturalism3 s.h.
RCE:7454 Supervision Theory and Practice3 s.h.
RCE:7455 Practicum in Clinical Supervision3 s.h.
RCE:7457 Seminar: Professional Orientation to Counselor Education and Supervision3 s.h.
RCE:7458 Seminar: Current Issues and Trends in Counselor Education and Supervision4 s.h.
RCE:7459 Seminar: Leadership and Advocacy in Counselor Education and Supervision3 s.h.
RCE:7465 Internship in Counselor Education (at least 240 hours)3 s.h.
At least one advanced course in psychological or educational measurement3 s.h.
REQUIRED PH.D. RESEARCH COURSES

Students must complete a specific sequence of research courses which include distributed course work in both qualitative and quantitative areas. They select from doctoral research courses listed at RCE Doctoral Research Requirements.

MINOR AREA

Students take a series of courses (typically a minimum of three) in an area of study outside the Department of Rehabilitation and Counselor Education. They select course work in collaboration with their minor area advisor and their major advisor.

MASTER'S THESIS PROJECT OR EQUIVALENT

Students are required to submit a previously conducted master's thesis for faculty review and approval or to complete a new supervised experiential research project before taking comprehensive exams.

Students without an approved M.A./M.S. thesis enroll in the following.

RCE:6394 M.A. Equivalency Research1-3 s.h.
COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION

The comprehensive examination consists of an oral defense of a student's portfolio, which covers six professional competency domains in counselor education, and an exam on the minor area. The examination may be taken during a student's final semester of course work, which typically includes an internship.

DISSERTATION

The major research project culminating in the doctoral thesis may be on any topic related to counseling and counselor education. The thesis advisor and the examining committee approve the topic and procedures at a formal prospectus meeting. The final oral examination on the thesis is conducted by the examining committee. Students usually earn 10 s.h. for dissertation work, but in some instances they may earn up to 15 s.h. The dissertation committee must include at least two counselor education and supervision faculty members.

RCE:7493 Ph.D. Thesis10-15 s.h.
ADMISSION

Applicants to any of the department's graduate programs must meet the department's general admission requirements; see "Admission" toward the end of this Catalog section. In addition, applicants to the Ph.D. program in counselor education and supervision must provide evidence of successful experience in counseling or a closely related profession. Applicants without experience may be admitted if their credentials indicate exceptional strengths.

Students may be admitted for fall, spring, or summer entry, but the department strongly advises application for fall entry. Consideration of applications begins January 15 for fall entry; all application materials should be received at the University by this date.

Ph.D.: Couple and Family Therapy

The Doctor of Philosophy program in couple and family therapy (CFT) requires a minimum of 80 s.h. of graduate credit. The program prepares professionals for couple and family therapy/marriage and family therapy leadership roles in academic and research settings, administration and supervision, and clinical delivery systems. It provides couple and family therapists the opportunity to master cutting-edge theoretical knowledge; research competencies at the most innovative levels; and advanced clinical, teaching, and supervisory skills.

Ph.D. students focus on three areas of advanced training: clinical practice, quantitative and qualitative research methods, and teaching and supervision. The program is designed to meet the accreditation standards of the Commission on Accreditation for Marriage and Family Therapy Education (COAMFTE) of the American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy. Ph.D. graduates are expected to have sufficient knowledge and skill to teach and conduct research at colleges and universities; supervise other professionals; and provide clinical services to individuals, couples, and families. They also should have competencies to engage in and evaluate theory-based qualitative and/or quantitative research.

Credit for the Ph.D. program may include credit for relevant course work completed for a COAMFTE-accredited master's degree program in couple and family therapy/marriage and family therapy or the equivalent.

Each student is required to submit a curriculum plan during the first two years of the program, before completing the comprehensive examination. The CFT faculty reviews each student annually; students must fulfill departmental requirements in order to continue in the program.

Work for the Ph.D. includes course work, a comprehensive exam, a clinical or academic internship, and a dissertation. Most students complete the program's required course work in two or three years and take one or two years to complete the internship and dissertation.

The Ph.D. program in couple and family therapy requires the following work.

DEPARTMENT CORE

All of these:

RCE:7353 Advanced Counseling and Psychotherapy3 s.h.
RCE:7357 Advanced Group Counseling and Psychotherapy3 s.h.
RCE:7400 Seminar: Ethics and Issues in Counseling3 s.h.
RCE:7451 Advanced Multiculturalism3 s.h.
REQUIRED PH.D. RESEARCH COURSES

Students must complete a specific sequence of research courses which include distributed course work in both qualitative and quantitative areas.  They select from doctoral research courses listed at RCE Doctoral Research Requirements.

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS
 
RCE:5262 Advanced Couple and Family Therapy3 s.h.
RCE:7361 Advanced Practicum in Couple and Family Therapy (must enroll multiple times for total of 9 s.h.)9 s.h.
RCE:7389 Seminar in Couple Intervention Research3 s.h.
RCE:7399 Supervision in Couple and Family Therapy3 s.h.
RCE:7404 Seminar in Child and Adolescent Intervention Research3 s.h.
RCE:7465 Internship in Counselor Education3 s.h.
MINOR AREA

In collaboration with the advisor and the curriculum plan committee, each student plans a minor area and selects a minimum of 9 s.h. of course work for it.

COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION

The comprehensive examination consists of a portfolio a student has compiled during the program and its oral defense once course work has been completed.

INTERNSHIP

Students must complete a clinical or academic internship.

RCE:7465 Internship in Counselor Education3 s.h.
DISSERTATION

Work for the doctoral dissertation employs a student’s independent skills in conducting original research. The dissertation process is supervised by a student's advisor. Depending on a student's research questions, the dissertation may require quantitative, qualitative, or mixed methods and may involve data collection or the secondary analysis of an existing data set. The thesis advisor and the examining committee approve the topic and procedures at a formal prospectus meeting. The final oral examination on the thesis is conducted by the examining committee.

RCE:7493 Ph.D. Thesis10-15 s.h.
ADMISSION

Applicants to any of the department's graduate programs must meet the department's general admission requirements; see "Admission" toward the end of this Catalog section.

Applicants should have a graduate g.p.a. of at least 3.00 and a Graduate Record Exam (GRE) General Test combined verbal and quantitative score of at least 300 on the revised test or at least 1,100 on the old test. They also must hold a master's degree in couple and family therapy/marriage and family therapy from a Commission on Accreditation for Marriage and Family Therapy Education (COAMFTE)-accredited program or the equivalent.

Students are admitted for fall entry. All application materials should be received at the University on or before December 31, when the faculty begins evaluating applications. The program requires an interview with the faculty, in person or by telephone. Generally, the interview is scheduled once complete application materials have been received.

M.A.: Rehabilitation and Mental Health Counseling

The program prepares professional counselors to provide assistance in psychological wellness, employment, independent living, and personal or economic development to persons with disabilities and other individuals who encounter barriers in meeting their own functional needs. It also prepares counselors in mental health counseling/psychiatric rehabilitation to obtain licensure as professionals who provide services in mental health settings.

Rehabilitation and mental health counselors work in a variety of settings, including public agencies such as state vocational rehabilitation programs and Veterans Affairs vocational rehabilitation programs; independent living centers; community-based rehabilitation centers and supported employment; community mental health centers; psychiatric rehabilitation programs; and private for-profit worker's compensation and insurance rehabilitation agencies. They provide interventions designed to help persons with disabilities adapt to the demands of their environments. They also prepare the environments to accommodate an individual's needs. Assessment, personal and vocational counseling, development of rehabilitation and treatment plans, case management, service coordination, psychosocial adjustment, job development, placement, and follow-up are typical services that rehabilitation and mental health counselors provide.

The M.A. program in rehabilitation and mental health counseling is accredited by the Council on Rehabilitation Education (CORE) and the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP) in clinical mental health counseling.

Graduates of the M.A. program are eligible for certification by the Commission on Rehabilitation Counselor Certification (CRCC) and the National Board for Certified Counselors. By completing the program's course work, students also complete the courses they must take in order to apply for licensure as mental health counselors in Iowa.

The Master of Arts program in rehabilitation and mental health counseling requires a minimum of 60 s.h. of graduate credit. Full-time students can complete the program in approximately 21 months (four semesters plus two summer sessions).

The M.A. curriculum blends academic work with supervised clinical experiences. Students take three semesters of practicum concurrently with academic courses. The program concludes with a full-time internship (40 hours per week) during a spring semester. Students are assigned to rehabilitation and community mental health agencies or facilities that meet CORE and CACREP accreditation standards and that have programs or clientele who match a student's interests and educational objectives. Clinical placements require criminal background checks.

Supervised practicums, internships, and comprehensive examinations are not offered during summer sessions.

The M.A. program in rehabilitation and mental health counseling requires the following work.

DEPARTMENT REQUIREMENTS

All of these:

RCE:5202 Introduction to Group Counseling3 s.h.
RCE:5221 Theories of Counseling and Human Development Across the Life Span3 s.h.
RCE:5250 Multiculturalism in Helping Professions (or equivalent)3 s.h.
RCE:5270 Issues and Ethics in Counseling3 s.h.
RCE:5276 Research in Rehabilitation and Mental Health Counseling3 s.h.
RCE:5278 Applied Microcounseling3 s.h.
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

All of these:

RCE:5210 Rehabilitation Client Assessment3 s.h.
RCE:5241 Introduction to Rehabilitation and Mental Health Counseling3 s.h.
RCE:5247 Medical Aspects of Disability3 s.h.
RCE:5248 Diagnosis and Treatment Planning for Psychiatric Rehabilitation3 s.h.
RCE:5249 Psychiatric Disorders and Interventions3 s.h.
RCE:6341 Job Development Placement and Follow-up3 s.h.
RCE:6342 Psychosocial and Developmental Aspects3 s.h.
CLINICAL PRACTICE

All of these:

RCE:6348 Prepracticum in Rehabilitation and Mental Health Counseling3 s.h.
RCE:6349 Practicum in Rehabilitation and Mental Health Counseling3 s.h.
RCE:6350 Internship I: Rehabilitation and Mental Health Counseling3 s.h.
RCE:6352 Internship II: Rehabilitation and Mental Health Counseling9-12 s.h.
COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION

The comprehensive examination consists of two exams totaling six hours: a three-hour departmental comprehensive examination and a three-hour written examination on the process and practice of rehabilitation and mental health counseling. Exams are offered only during fall and spring semesters.

ADMISSION

Applicants to any of the department's graduate programs must meet the department's general admission requirements; see "Admission" toward the end of this Catalog section.

Applicants to the M.A. program in rehabilitation and mental health counseling should have a good academic record and relevant experience, such as assisting individuals with disabilities. No specific undergraduate major area of study is required for the M.A. program, but a major in one of the social sciences is considered good preparation. Postbaccalaureate work experience relevant to the field of rehabilitation and mental health counseling is preferred. The program encourages applications from persons traditionally underrepresented in the field, particularly those with a disability and/or members of minority or ethnic groups. Applicants also must meet the department's admission requirements (see "Admission" later in this section). A personal interview is required, either in person or by telephone.

Applications for full-time study are accepted for summer session (June) entry; application deadline for full-time study is March 1. Applications for part-time study are accepted for fall and spring semesters and are considered when class space permits.

Students pursue a sequenced plan of study that begins in summer session. Although students may be admitted for any semester, the program highly recommends that full-time students begin in summer.

Ph.D.: Rehabilitation Counselor Education

The Doctor of Philosophy program in rehabilitation counselor education requires a minimum of 90 s.h. of graduate credit. The program prepares professionals for leadership roles in rehabilitation counselor education, research, administration, and service delivery systems. It provides rehabilitation counselors the opportunity to master knowledge; clinical, teaching, and supervisory skills; and research competencies at the most advanced levels.

Ph.D. students focus on three areas of advanced development: rehabilitation counselor education and supervision, research, and professional practice. The program is flexible, permitting students to pursue individualized plans of study within the required curriculum. Ph.D. graduates are expected to have sufficient knowledge and skill to teach at colleges and universities, supervise other professionals, and provide clinical services to clients. They also should have competencies to engage in and evaluate theoretical, qualitative, and quantitative research.

Each student is required to submit a curriculum plan. The rehabilitation counseling faculty reviews each student annually. Students must meet the department's requirements in order to continue in the program.

The 90 s.h. required for the degree may include credit for relevant course work completed for a master's degree. This combination of master's and doctoral course work ensures exposure to vocational and psychiatric rehabilitation as well as to independent living rehabilitation and community-based counseling processes, concepts, programs, and services.

Students who are not eligible for certification by the Commission on Rehabilitation Counselor Certification (CRCC) may be required to take courses to become eligible.

Most students complete their course work and comprehensive exam in three years and take a fourth year to complete the dissertation.

The Ph.D. program in rehabilitation counselor education requires the following work.

DEPARTMENT CORE

All of these:

RCE:7255 Advanced Career Development and Counseling (or equivalent)3 s.h.
RCE:7353 Advanced Counseling and Psychotherapy3 s.h.
RCE:7357 Advanced Group Counseling and Psychotherapy3 s.h.
RCE:7400 Seminar: Ethics and Issues in Counseling3 s.h.
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS

Students are expected to have completed core rehabilitation counseling requirements during master's degree work (see "M.A.: Rehabilitation and Mental Health Counseling" above). The advisor and program faculty determine which master's-level courses must be taken to correct deficiencies. Students also must complete the following.

RCE:7360 Advanced Practicum in Counseling (section 1)3 s.h.
RCE:7369 Advanced Seminar in Rehabilitation Counseling3 s.h.
RCE:7380 Practicum in College Teaching1-3 s.h.
RCE:7385 Teaching and Learning in Higher Education3 s.h.
RCE:7450 Advanced Social Psychology of Disability3 s.h.
RCE:7454 Supervision Theory and Practice3 s.h.
RCE:7455 Practicum in Clinical Supervision3 s.h.
RCE:7462 Advanced Practicum in Clinical Teaching3 s.h.
PSQF:6217 Seminar in College Teaching1-3 s.h.
REQUIRED PH.D. RESEARCH COURSES

Students must complete a specific sequence of research courses which include distributed course work in both qualitative and quantitative areas. They select from doctoral research courses listed at RCE Doctoral Research Requirements.

MINOR AREA

Students plan a minor area in collaboration with their major advisor and curriculum plan committee. The minor area must be outside the department. Students select a minimum of 9 s.h. of course work in the minor area, in collaboration with their minor advisor and with the approval of their curriculum plan committee.

COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION

The comprehensive examination consists of three exams that total nine hours. They cover the department core (three hours), rehabilitation counseling—theory, practice, and research (three hours), and the minor area (three hours).

DISSERTATION

The dissertation is a major research study planned in collaboration with a student's major advisor. At least two rehabilitation counseling faculty members serve on the dissertation committee; one of them chairs or co-chairs the committee.

RCE:7493 Ph.D. Thesis10-15 s.h.
ADMISSION

Applicants to any of the department's graduate programs must meet the department's general admission requirements; see "Admission" toward the end of this Catalog section.

Applicants to the Ph.D. program in rehabilitation counselor education should have a master's degree in rehabilitation counseling or a related area and a graduate g.p.a. of 3.00 or higher. One year of full-time work experience in rehabilitation or a related field is strongly encouraged. Applicants should submit a written statement of purpose for pursuing the Ph.D. in rehabilitation counselor education and a statement of personal career objectives, official score on the Graduate Record Exam (GRE) General Test, and three letters of recommendation. A personal interview is required.

Applications are accepted for fall, spring, or summer entry; fall entry is strongly advised. Faculty consideration of applications begins January 15 for fall entry, November 15 for spring entry, and April 1 for summer entry.

M.A.: School Counseling

The Master of Arts program in school counseling requires a minimum of 54 s.h. of graduate credit. The program prepares individuals to work effectively as counselors in K-12 school settings. It is accredited by the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP).

Successful graduates are eligible for K-12 school counselor licensure in Iowa. Students may apply to the National Board for Certified Counselors at the completion of their programs. They also may earn an endorsement in talented and gifted education or a certificate from the Belin-Blank Center for Gifted Education by taking additional course work.

During the first few semesters, students take core cognate courses, including course work on gifted education, and the microcounseling clinical skills laboratory. Then they enter a counseling practicum followed by an internship. Students who enter without teaching licensure are required to take additional course work in education—EPLS:3000 Foundations of Education, EDTL:4900 Foundations of Special Education, and PSQF:6200 Educational Psychology or equivalent—to meet school counselor licensure standards. Students are expected to complete at least 100 clock hours in practicum and 600 clock hours in internship activities in an approved school setting, under the supervision of an experienced licensed school counselor and a University faculty supervisor.

Students must complete program and department core courses as outlined on the Department of Rehabilitation and Counselor Education web site before enrolling in RCE:6300 Practicum in School Counseling for the spring semester of their second year in the program. All students are required to complete a background check the spring before they enroll in the practicum. Students who are not licensed teachers must complete course work in education before enrolling in the practicum.

Each student's progress is reviewed periodically by the major advisor. Students who have successfully completed all prerequisites for RCE:6300 Practicum in School Counseling are reviewed in the semester before they take the practicum course, to assure that they are prepared for it. During the summer, students are evaluated to assure their readiness for the internship RCE:6321 Internship in Elementary School Counseling or RCE:6322 Internship in Secondary School Counseling, which requires assignment in approved schools for the fall and/or spring semesters.

The M.A. program in school counseling requires the following work.

REQUIRED COURSES

The following schedule of required courses reflects a three-year program of study. Students who do not have teacher licensure are required to complete at least three additional courses in education before the third year of classes.

RCE:4137 Introduction to Educating Gifted Students3 s.h.
RCE:5200 Professional School Counselor3 s.h.
RCE:5202 Introduction to Group Counseling3 s.h.
RCE:5203 Career Development3 s.h.
RCE:5204 School Culture and Classroom Management for School Counselors3 s.h.
RCE:5221 Theories of Counseling and Human Development Across the Life Span3 s.h.
RCE:5222 Counseling Children and Adolescents in Schools3 s.h.
RCE:5223 Counseling Gifted and Talented Students3 s.h.
RCE:5230 School Counseling Program Leadership and Management3 s.h.
RCE:5250 Multiculturalism in Helping Professions3 s.h.
RCE:5254 Assessment and Appraisal3 s.h.
RCE:5256 Action Research: School-Based Field Research3 s.h.
RCE:5278 Applied Microcounseling3 s.h.
RCE:6300 Practicum in School Counseling3 s.h.
RCE:6321 Internship in Elementary School Counseling3 s.h.
RCE:6322 Internship in Secondary School Counseling3 s.h.
EDTL:4940 Characteristics of Disabilities3 s.h.
EPLS:6206 Research Process and Design3 s.h.
COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION

All students are required to take comprehensive exams for the departmental core and for school counseling during their final semester of internship. Comprehensive exams include a written six-hour exam in the departmental core and school counseling. An oral exam also is required unless waived by the comprehensive exam committee.

ADMISSION

Applicants to any of the department's graduate programs must meet the department's general admission requirements; see "Admission" below. Applicants to the M.A. program in school counseling should have an undergraduate g.p.a. of 3.00 or higher. The department prefers that applicants have one year of teaching experience or successful experiences with children and/or adolescents, which they must document in a written statement. Graduate Record Exam (GRE) General Test scores must be on file at the University.

Applications are accepted for summer and fall entry and should be submitted by January 25th.

Admission

Applicants to any of the department's degree programs must satisfy the following admission requirements. Applicants also must meet the admission requirements of the Graduate College; see the Manual of Rules and Regulations of the Graduate College.

Applicants must submit the following:

a completed graduate application form;

copies of official transcripts of all previous undergraduate and graduate college work;

official report of Graduate Record Exam (GRE) General Test verbal and quantitative scores;

a statement of an applicant's reasons for seeking an advanced degree in the department, including a statement of personal career objectives;

three current letters of recommendation from persons qualified to assess the applicant's prospects for completing the M.A. or Ph.D. and to assess the applicant's commitment to the profession.

The department may request a personal or telephone interview.

The following admission standards are considered for individual program admission decisions.

M.A. applicants should have an undergraduate g.p.a. of at least 3.00.

Ph.D. applicants should have a graduate g.p.a. of at least 3.00; those who have not been granted a graduate degree should have an undergraduate g.p.a. of at least 3.00.

International applicants must score at least 550 (paper-based) or 80 (Internet-based) on the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). The department may require applicants with lower TOEFL scores to complete University of Iowa course work in English language fluency. TOEFL scores must be submitted with the application for admission.

Typically, doctoral students are not admitted unless they have completed a master's degree in counseling or a related field. Relevant work experiences are important. Students who are accepted without a related master's degree must complete core master's-level course work before taking advanced Ph.D. courses. Required remedial courses and experiences are determined in consultation with the advisor and are included in a student's curriculum plan.

The criteria listed above are minimum standards for admission. Final admission decisions are made by faculty committees. Some of the department's degree programs have additional admission requirements; see the descriptions of the individual degree programs earlier in this Catalog section.

APPLICATION

For application materials, visit Iowa Graduate Admissions and the Department of Rehabilitation and Counselor Education web site.

Applications must be complete before they can be reviewed. Applicants are responsible for providing a complete application dossier; to check on whether an application dossier is complete, contact the College of Education Office of Education Services.

Applicants are notified in writing after their applications have been reviewed. Applicants who are accepted must reply in writing in order to maintain their admission status.

MAINTAINING GOOD STANDING

All graduate students must meet the following standards in order to remain in their degree programs and advance to candidacy and remain a candidate for a degree:

maintain a g.p.a. of at least 3.00;

successfully complete a practicum, internship, or equivalent professional experience;

maintain professional behavior consistent with the ACA Code of Ethics (American Counseling Association) for students enrolled in a counseling graduate program, or the AAMFT Code of Ethics (American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy) for graduate students in couples and family therapy, and any additional code of professional ethics adhered to in any agency in which the student completes a practicum or internship;

demonstrate progress toward the degree through successful completion of semester hours specified in the curriculum plan and active registration each session (exceptions may be approved by the advisor).

Each student's academic and professional progress is reviewed annually. A written report is provided to the student and a copy is placed in his or her department file.

PROBATIONAL STATUS

M.A. and Ph.D. students who earn a cumulative g.p.a. lower than 3.00 are placed on probational status and are notified in writing. Students on probational status have two consecutive sessions to raise their grade-point average to the established standard. If that requirement is not met, a student may be removed from the program. Each student is allowed one probational status during his or her program of study.

Financial Support

Students in the department may apply for a wide variety of graduate assistantships. For example, many of the University's student service units award graduate assistantships. Applicants for assistantships should contact the department or the coordinator of the particular graduate program they plan to enter.

Applicants seeking fellowships or assistantships should complete their applications as early as possible.

Facilities

An on-campus counseling suite serves as a laboratory for training. In addition, a wide variety of supervised clinical experiences are available in community agencies, schools, and colleges, as well as throughout the University. Internships may be completed at approved sites nationwide.

Courses

Lower-Level Undergraduate

RCE:1029 First-Year Seminar1 s.h.
Small discussion class taught by a faculty member; topics chosen by instructor; may include outside activities (e.g., films, lectures, performances, readings, visits to research facilities). Requirements: first‑ or second‑semester standing
 
RCE:1030 Belin-Blank Center Seminar1 s.h.
Presentations and discussions by University resource experts and Belin‑Blank Center for Gifted Education staff. Requirements: Belin‑Blank Center student
 
RCE:2081 Making a Vocational-Educational Choice2-3 s.h.
Vocational decision‑making process, self‑evaluation, exploration of the world of work; for students who are uncertain about their educational and vocational goals.
 

Upper-Level Undergraduate and Graduate

RCE:4081 ePortfolio Production1-2 s.h.
Experience producing an ePortfolio and uploading it to the Internet; practical experience using digital tools, content and design related to ePortfolio production; experience using a web browser and access to the Internet and to a digital camera or scanner. Requirements: able to perform basic computer functions and use a World Wide Web browser Same as PSQF:4081, EALL:4081, EDTL:4081, EPLS:4081.
 
RCE:4110 Psychology of Food and Mood3 s.h.
Neurobehavioral and psychological determinants of food preference, behavior, and mood management; cultural meanings of food in North America, obesity, dieting, disordered eating; how we use food as a means of managing or damaging our food and health.
 
RCE:4111 Relationships and Workplace Dynamics: Keys to a Successful Career3 s.h.
Examination of human relations, workplace organizational structures, and workplace expectations of team work, diversity, conflict, conflict resolution and communication; leadership, employees' effect on leadership, individual self‑awareness, team structures, leadership habits, behaviors and organizational influences.
 
RCE:4119 Family Issues in Giftedness1 s.h.
Family dynamics and issues that arise when one or more children are identified as gifted; parent/child, sibling, school/family relationships.
 
RCE:4120 Psychology of Giftedness3 s.h.
Theories of learning, child development, motivation; issues unique to gifted education. Same as PSQF:4120.
 
RCE:4121 Identification of Students for Gifted Programs3 s.h.
Interpretation of standardized tests and other measurement instruments used to identify academic talent and program effectively for grades K‑12; ability, aptitude, achievement tests; current issues in the uses of various instruments. Same as PSQF:4121.
 
RCE:4123 Gender Issues and Giftedness1 s.h.
Effect of gender on development of giftedness; differential needs of girls, boys; strategies for effective teaching, gender equity.
 
RCE:4124 Ethnic and Cultural Issues and Giftedness1 s.h.
Effect of ethnicity and culture on development of giftedness; special needs of Black, Hispanic, Native American, and Asian gifted students; strategies for identification, programming.
 
RCE:4125 Counseling and Psychological Needs of the Gifted1 s.h.
Psychological aspects of giftedness, counseling techniques appropriate for gifted children, adolescents; socio‑emotional concerns, career development, underachievement. Same as PSQF:4125.
 
RCE:4126 Cognitive and Affective Needs of Underachieving Gifted1 s.h.
Diagnostic strategy for identifying types of underachievement, teaching and counseling interventions appropriate for each. Same as PSQF:4126.
 
RCE:4127 Research and Theory in Talent/Giftedness1 s.h.
Biennial research symposium. Same as PSQF:4127.
 
RCE:4128 Advanced Leadership Seminar in Gifted Education1 s.h.
Development of administrative policies and programming based on empirical research; for experienced leaders in gifted education.
 
RCE:4129 Creativity: Issues and Applications in Gifted Education1 s.h.
Theories that underpin contemporary definitions of creativity; instruments developed to measure creativity; activities in the school environment that enhance or inhibit student creativity. Same as PSQF:4129.
 
RCE:4130 Human Sexuality3 s.h.
How young adults experience, discuss, and engage in sex; short essays.
 
RCE:4131 Loss, Death, and Bereavement3 s.h.
Psychological study of death, grief, loss, bereavement, and coping from a multidimensional and multidisciplinary perspective; loss and grief as natural experiences that are not often explicitly discussed; overview of topics relating to death, including multicultural attitudes toward death, death practices, theories on loss and bereavement, and grieving throughout the life cycle; hospice and palliative care, suicide, and making meaning of life out of death; development of critical thinking skills by engaging in empirically‑based discussions.
 
RCE:4132 Introduction to Addictions and Impulse Control Disorders3 s.h.
Exploration of addictions and impulse control disorders; legal, social, physical, and emotional issues related to addictions and impulse control disorders.
 
RCE:4137 Introduction to Educating Gifted Students3 s.h.
Fundamental issues such as curriculum, counseling, family issues, gender and minority issues. Same as EDTL:4137.
 
RCE:4140 Foundations of Leadership for Community Agencies3 s.h.
Preparation to become effective employees and leaders; emphasis on leadership roles in clinical and other human service or health care settings; how leadership transcends job title associated with high work performance; experiential activities that illustrate key didactic concepts and didactic lecture review, written assignments, experiential assignment, in‑depth discussions illustrating key concepts.
 
RCE:4145 Marriage and Family Interaction3 s.h.
Contemporary American marriage, family relationships; mate selection.
 
RCE:4162 Introduction to Couple and Family Therapy3 s.h.
Evolution of the family therapy movement and issues related to functional and dysfunctional family systems; significant models of family therapy and specific techniques.
 
RCE:4173 Trauma Across the Lifespan3 s.h.
Current theory and practice models related to trauma and crisis intervention; overview of multi‑system level definitions of trauma experience (historical, individual, interpersonal, family, organizational, community, global); various approaches to trauma response theory; unique contributions that counselors offer (strength, resiliency, coping); commitments to multicultural and systems factors; macro‑ to micro‑level understanding of trauma.
 
RCE:4174 Positive Psychology3 s.h.
Promotion of human potential as a focus for counseling professionals that provides a supplement to diagnosis and treatment of pathology; how to achieve happiness, resilience, wellness, and life satisfaction through enhancement of human strengths and virtues.
 
RCE:4175 Motivational Interviewing3 s.h.
Motivational Interviewing (Miller & Rollnick) and the stages of change model.
 
RCE:4176 Child Abuse: Assessment, Intervention, and Advocacy3 s.h.
Preparation for work involving abused children or child abuse issues; appropriate for careers in counseling, education, health sciences, law, psychology, social work, and so forth; interactive approach.
 
RCE:4177 Life After Service: Veterans in College3 s.h.
Introduction to various resources on campus related to increasing student veterans' success as college students; topics and assignments specifically tailored to military service‑connected students (e.g., ROTC students, national guard or reserve military members, active duty veterans); topics include vocational rehabilitation, GI Bill, current events, and health care (sleep, TBI, traumatic stress responses, substance abuse); development of academic skills for writing, more effective studying, improved reading and note taking.
 
RCE:4178 Microcounseling1,3 s.h.
Basic skills of listening, responding, empathy, focus; advanced skills of meaning, confrontation, reframing, directives, action skills.
 
RCE:4179 Sexuality Within the Helping Professions3 s.h.
Relationship between sexuality and mental health; varied ethical and professional issues in sex therapy.
 
RCE:4180 Topical Seminar for Helping Professionalsarr.
Topics for the continuing education of counselors and related professionals.
 
RCE:4185 Introduction to Substance Abuse3 s.h.
Theories of addiction and pharmacology of psychoactive drugs; legal, familial, biological, multicultural, historical issues related to substance use and misuse.
 
RCE:4187 Introduction to Assistive Technology3 s.h.
How assistive technology can be used for attainment of goals in education or work. Same as EDTL:4987.
 
RCE:4188 Practicum in Teaching and Curriculum Development in Gifted Education1-6 s.h.
Experience in developing course materials for classes offered through the Belin‑Blank Center for Gifted Education. Same as EDTL:4188.
 
RCE:4190 Group Processes for Related Professions3 s.h.
Small‑group procedures for personal and organizational development in educational settings; discussions of theoretical and ethical issues, multicultural considerations, and research findings supplemented with demonstrations; participation in a personal growth group.
 
RCE:4191 Advocacy: Awareness, Assertiveness, and Activismarr.
Introduction to advocacy skills—communicate, convey, negotiate or assert interests, desires, needs, and rights for self or others; opportunity to design and implement a plan of change; ecological model of human interaction that suggests a person must be viewed within context of his or her environment(s); how having power on a personal and social level impacts one's environment and is central to a person's well‑being; advocation as a central function of helping professions.
 
RCE:4192 Group Leadership in Human Sexuality0-3 s.h.
How to teach human sexuality; how to help students achieve an open‑minded yet responsible attitude toward their own and others' sexuality. Prerequisites: RCE:4130
 
RCE:4193 Individual Instruction—Undergraduatearr.
 
RCE:4194 Interpersonal Effectiveness3 s.h.
Paradigms and techniques that enhance interpersonal relationship skills.
 
RCE:4195 Ethics in Human Relations and Counseling3 s.h.
Morality and ethics; ethical issues; models and techniques for effective ethical decision making in personal and professional interactions.
 
RCE:4197 Citizenship in a Multicultural Society3 s.h.
Human relationships in the context of societal oppressions such as racism, sexism, able‑bodyism, and heterosexism.
 
RCE:4199 Counseling for Related Professions3 s.h.
Counseling theories and techniques; ethical and multicultural considerations; small‑group discussions, demonstrations, lectures.
 

Graduate

RCE:5200 Professional School Counselor3 s.h.
Professional identity of school counselors, K‑12 school counseling program delivery systems, legal and ethical issues. Requirements: admission to school counseling program
 
RCE:5202 Introduction to Group Counseling3 s.h.
Research, theory, ethics, planning, and practice in group counseling; leadership styles and multicultural considerations; group participation. Prerequisites: RCE:5221 Corequisites: RCE:5278 Requirements: rehabilitation and counselor education enrollment
 
RCE:5203 Career Development3 s.h.
Preparation for counselors and student affairs professionals; career development concepts and theories, family and work, career counseling goals and objectives, exemplary techniques and materials, career program planning, evaluation procedures. Requirements: rehabilitation and counselor education enrollment
 
RCE:5204 School Culture and Classroom Management for School Counselors3 s.h.
American public elementary and secondary schools and the school counselor's role; classroom management for school counselors.
 
RCE:5210 Rehabilitation Client Assessment3 s.h.
Process and practice of assessing persons with disabilities for rehabilitation plan development and decision making; multicultural and ethical considerations.
 
RCE:5221 Theories of Counseling and Human Development Across the Life Span3 s.h.
Philosophical bases, ethical considerations, processes, issues, multicultural and life‑span developmental considerations in counseling theories and techniques. Requirements: rehabilitation and counselor education M.A. enrollment
 
RCE:5222 Counseling Children and Adolescents in Schools3 s.h.
Theory and practice of school‑based counseling interventions; child and adolescent development; prevention; special topics. Prerequisites: RCE:5221 or RCE:5278
 
RCE:5223 Counseling Gifted and Talented Students3 s.h.
Learning theories and best practices related to school counseling of gifted and talented students; academic, career, and personal/social development. Prerequisites: RCE:4137
 
RCE:5226 Assessment of Giftedness3 s.h.
Training and practice in assessment of gifted children. Same as PSQF:5226.
 
RCE:5230 School Counseling Program Leadership and Management3 s.h.
Comprehensive K‑12 school counseling program components and structures; program leadership, planning, accountability; behavioral consultation and collaboration; ethical, multicultural, family considerations. Corequisites: RCE:6321 or RCE:6322
 
RCE:5237 Seminar in Gifted Education2-3 s.h.
Teaching and counseling needs of gifted students K‑12; intensive 10‑day residential program. Requirements: work as teacher with Belin Fellowship
 
RCE:5238 Advanced Seminar in Gifted Education1 s.h.
Supervisory, administrative, and research issues; fellowships for seminar participants. Prerequisites: RCE:5237
 
RCE:5241 Introduction to Rehabilitation and Mental Health Counseling3 s.h.
Historical, philosophical, legislative, societal, and multicultural overview of rehabilitation and mental health process and practice in community‑based settings; roles of rehabilitation and mental health professionals, nature of agencies, resources, contemporary issues and ethics.
 
RCE:5247 Medical Aspects of Disability3 s.h.
Medical evaluation as part of the rehabilitation process; body systems, medical terminology, medical description of disabilities; functional limitations; projection of potential for rehabilitation and mental health applied to planning and placement.
 
RCE:5248 Diagnosis and Treatment Planning for Psychiatric Rehabilitation3 s.h.
Psychiatric conditions, their diagnostic criteria using the DSM‑IV‑TR, treatment planning considerations; medical and psychiatric rehabilitation models, interrelationship in providing services to persons with psychiatric disabilities; functional assessment and client‑driven rehabilitation planning for community reintegration. Requirements: rehabilitation and counselor education enrollment
 
RCE:5249 Psychiatric Disorders and Interventions3 s.h.
Description, classification, and theoretical perspectives related to psychiatric disorders; models of intervention in community‑based settings.
 
RCE:5250 Multiculturalism in Helping Professions3 s.h.
Theory and application of multicultural competency in the helping professions; ethical treatment of clients in the context of a multiculturally diverse society; knowledge, skill, self‑awareness components relevant for helping practitioners. Requirements: rehabilitation and counselor education enrollment
 
RCE:5254 Assessment and Appraisal3 s.h.
Didactic experiences related to individual and group assessment and appraisal; for school professionals.
 
RCE:5256 Action Research: School-Based Field Research3 s.h.
Field‑based research experiences in school settings; students conceptualize, design, conduct, and articulate school‑based research findings. Prerequisites: RCE:5254
 
RCE:5262 Advanced Couple and Family Therapy3 s.h.
Introduction to couple and family therapy, theory, ethics, and techniques as applied to problems of marriage and family over life span; multicultural considerations. Requirements: advanced graduate standing Recommendations: RCE:4162
 
RCE:5270 Issues and Ethics in Counseling3 s.h.
Ethical standards and decision making; current issues; ethical, legal, and multicultural considerations for counseling in agencies and schools; emphasis on professional practice.
 
RCE:5276 Research in Rehabilitation and Mental Health Counseling3 s.h.
Current state of counseling practice and emphasis on accountability as a professional quality; need for counselors to be knowledgeable and skillful in identifying and using "what works" in counseling endeavors; introduction to major principles, concepts, and practices in social science research, including program evaluation; preparing counselors‑in‑training as future research consumers. Recommendations: rehabilitation and mental health counseling major
 
RCE:5278 Applied Microcounseling3 s.h.
Development of basic and advanced counseling skills; preparation for work in education and community settings.
 
RCE:5280 Topical Seminar in RCEarr.
Special topics dealing with contemporary problems of concern to counselors in specific settings.
 
RCE:6236 Counseling and Psychotherapy for Persons with Disabilities3 s.h.
Preparation for future psychologists and counselors to work with persons with disabilities throughout the lifespan; examination of disability issues within the context of present and past theoretical constructs. Requirements: enrollment in psychological and quantitative foundations or rehabilitation and counselor education Same as PSQF:6236.
 
RCE:6263 Consultation Theory and Practice3 s.h.
Review of concepts and practice of consultation and collaboration in educational and human services settings; focus on mental health, organizational, behavioral, and instructional models. Same as PSQF:6263.
 
RCE:6293 Individual Instruction--Graduatearr.
 
RCE:6300 Practicum in School Counseling3 s.h.
Supervised experience counseling and consulting in elementary and secondary school settings. Requirements: completion of school counseling core courses
 
RCE:6321 Internship in Elementary School Counseling3 s.h.
Supervised placement in an elementary school setting; performance of tasks, responsibilities of an elementary school counselor. Prerequisites: RCE:6300 Requirements: completion of all required school counseling courses
 
RCE:6322 Internship in Secondary School Counseling3 s.h.
Supervised placement in a secondary school setting; performance of tasks, responsibilities of a secondary school counselor. Prerequisites: RCE:6300 Requirements: completion of all required school counseling courses
 
RCE:6323 Internship in Middle School Counseling3 s.h.
Supervised placement in a middle school setting; performance of tasks and responsibilities of a middle school counselor. Prerequisites: RCE:6300 Requirements: completion of all required school counseling courses
 
RCE:6341 Job Development Placement and Follow-up3 s.h.
Obtaining appropriate jobs for individuals with disabilities who have received rehabilitation services; client, counselor, employer, job specifications.
 
RCE:6342 Psychosocial and Developmental Aspects3 s.h.
Dynamics of adjustment and coping for persons with chronic illness or those with disabilities through the life span; somatopsychological, psychosocial, and developmental perspectives on disability.
 
RCE:6348 Prepracticum in Rehabilitation and Mental Health Counseling3 s.h.
Counseling laboratory to promote knowledge, skills, and awareness of effective and ethical counseling methods, and fundamentals of helping relationships and case management. Prerequisites: RCE:5221 Corequisites: RCE:5278
 
RCE:6349 Practicum in Rehabilitation and Mental Health Counselingarr.
Experience in a community agency serving individuals with disabilities and mental health disorders, supervised by a certified rehabilitation counselor in an approved site. Prerequisites: RCE:6348
 
RCE:6350 Internship I: Rehabilitation and Mental Health Counseling3-6 s.h.
Experience to enhance competency in agencies and with persons represented in student's specialty area. Prerequisites: RCE:6349
 
RCE:6352 Internship II: Rehabilitation and Mental Health Counselingarr.
Full‑time clinical experience in rehabilitation and mental health settings; training in wide range of rehabilitation and mental health functions under supervision of a qualified M.A. counselor with appropriate credentials. Prerequisites: RCE:6350
 
RCE:6393 M.A. Thesisarr.
 
RCE:6394 M.A. Equivalency Research1-3 s.h.
Preparation for comprehensive examination.
 
RCE:7255 Advanced Career Development and Counseling3 s.h.
Major concepts and research evidence about life‑span vocational behavior; theories of vocational choice, adjustment, development in a multicultural world.
 
RCE:7311 Practicum in Counseling and Psychological Services for Gifted Students1-6 s.h.
Prerequisites: RCE:4178 Requirements: course work in counseling education, counseling psychology, school psychology, educational psychology, or related fields Same as PSQF:7311.
 
RCE:7338 Essentials of Qualitative Inquiry3 s.h.
Principles, processes of qualitative research in education; methods of design, data collection and analysis, interpretation, trustworthiness. Requirements: Ph.D. enrollment and introductory research course
 
RCE:7347 Home/School/Community: System Interventions3 s.h.
Interventions used by school and support system personnel; focus on work with parents, siblings. Same as PSQF:7347.
 
RCE:7353 Advanced Counseling and Psychotherapy3 s.h.
Theories, techniques, and ethics of counseling clients with personal and interpersonal problems; ethical and multicultural considerations.
 
RCE:7357 Advanced Group Counseling and Psychotherapy3 s.h.
Theories and techniques of group counseling and psychotherapy; integration of theory, experience, and research in group counseling; ethical and multicultural considerations.
 
RCE:7360 Advanced Practicum in Counselingarr.
Supervised practice in counseling; intensive analysis of counselor ethics, styles, methods. Advanced graduate standing in counselor education and consent of instructor required. Prerequisites: RCE:5221 Requirements: Ph.D. enrollment, advanced graduate standing in counselor education, and counseling introductory practicum; and concurrent enrollment in RCE:5249 for rehabilitation counselor education student
 
RCE:7361 Advanced Practicum in Couple and Family Therapy1-3 s.h.
Opportunity to accumulate client contact and supervision hours towards graduation and licensure; conceptual and executive skills, observational skills and abilities to work as a member of a therapeutic team, awareness of how personal growth and development as a therapist impacts work with clients, comfort and motivation to learn multiple training levels provided, creation of collaborative and supportive atmosphere on all practicum levels. Requirements: enrollment in couple and family therapy program
 
RCE:7369 Advanced Seminar in Rehabilitation Counseling3 s.h.
Philosophy, theory, research base, practice of rehabilitation counseling, psychology; ethical and multicultural considerations; relationship to disability studies; psychological aspects of disability, client assessment, history, systems, contemporary issues.
 
RCE:7380 Practicum in College Teachingarr.
Supervised college teaching experience in counselor education courses; teaching in collaboration with faculty, observation and critiques of teaching, participation in course planning and evaluation procedures; ethical and multicultural considerations.
 
RCE:7385 Teaching and Learning in Higher Education3 s.h.
Current theoretical and empirical literature on teaching and learning in higher education; focus on development of effective teaching practice. Same as PSQF:7385, EPLS:7385, GRAD:7385, EDTL:7385.
 
RCE:7388 Family Development3 s.h.
Overview of research relating to family development, family structure, and cultural/ethnic diversity; how research can be applied to clinical practice; focus on strengths and challenges of families with varying structures, cultural dimensions in family functioning, developmental perspectives on family functioning, and how these factors can advance family systems based on research and practice.
 
RCE:7389 Seminar in Couple Intervention Research3 s.h.
Overview of couple intervention and outcome research; focus on evidence‑based couple therapies (i.e., Emotionally Focused Couple Therapy, Behavioral Couple Therapy, work of John Gottman); research addressing effectiveness and efficiency of couple interventions in treatment of couple distress issues highly comorbid with distress, including review of mental and physical health problems; research addressing factors associated with treatment outcomes.
 
RCE:7399 Supervision in Couple and Family Therapy3 s.h.
Supervision of Master's‑level couple and family therapy students; mentoring supervision received from supervision instructor; assignments reflect requirements for AAMFT Approved Supervisor designation; fulfills didactic requirement for AAMFT Approved Supervisor status. Requirements: enrollment in couple and family therapy program
 
RCE:7400 Seminar: Ethics and Issues in Counseling3 s.h.
Ethical, professional, and contemporary issues in counseling practice, education, and research. Requirements: rehabilitation and counselor education Ph.D. enrollment
 
RCE:7404 Seminar in Child and Adolescent Intervention Research3 s.h.
Review and analysis of pertinent literature in area of child and adolescent intervention research; stage 1‑3 clinical trials and federal funding process of intervention research in family therapy and family psychology fields; focus on published outcome studies in areas of childhood disorders, Filial Therapy, Functional Family Therapy, Multisystemic Therapy, and Multi‑Dimensional Family Therapy; published and unpublished outcome studies of six research groups within the last ten years and their federally funded research projects. Prerequisites: RCE:5262
 
RCE:7438 Advanced Qualitative Research Seminar in Rehabilitation and Counselor Education3 s.h.
Exploration of qualitative research at advanced theoretical, practical, and technical level, inside and outside a typical classroom environment; scholarly discussions. Prerequisites: RCE:7338
 
RCE:7440 Seminar in Family-Based Play Therapy Interventions3 s.h.
Inclusion of children in family therapy sessions; varied therapeutic strategies to effectively work with young children and their parents; employment of developmental lens (therapeutic techniques largely depend on children's age and developmental stage) and theoretical lens (many techniques are linked to certain theoretical approaches); development of therapeutic skills with application of varied therapeutic approaches in clinical work; does not train students to become play therapists and/or child therapists. Prerequisites: RCE:5262
 
RCE:7444 Qualitative Research in the Multicultural Context3 s.h.
Exploration of qualitative research in multicultural context; application of knowledge gained in introductory qualitative courses; utilization of qualitative skill sets for completion of a multicultural‑focused project; multicultural field research project which may involve travel or virtual connections outside of regular class time; field experience projects with online problem‑based learning activities, consultation, and virtual supervised small group work. Prerequisites: PSQF:6235 or RCE:5250 or RCE:7338
 
RCE:7448 Integrated Developmental Theory and Counseling3 s.h.
Advanced issues, theoretical perspectives, and research in human development across the life span; influential theories in human development; related implications for counseling, supervision, and research; integrated understanding of perspectives through position papers, reflection papers, and research proposal project. Requirements: graduate standing in rehabilitation and counselor education
 
RCE:7450 Advanced Social Psychology of Disability3 s.h.
Disability issues from individual and societal perspectives; psychosocial aspects of disability and disability studies; seminar. Requirements: Ph.D. enrollment
 
RCE:7451 Advanced Multiculturalism3 s.h.
Impact of culture, race, ethnicity, and intersections of identity on counseling in higher education and student affairs settings. Prerequisites: RCE:5250
 
RCE:7454 Supervision Theory and Practice3 s.h.
Conceptual models, ethics, multicultural considerations, research, and program design for counselor supervision and consultation.
 
RCE:7455 Practicum in Clinical Supervisionarr.
Supervision of students enrolled in counseling practicum. Prerequisites: RCE:7454
 
RCE:7457 Seminar: Professional Orientation to Counselor Education and Supervision3 s.h.
Professional orientation issues in counselor education and supervision; related documents, bylaws, professional expectations.
 
RCE:7458 Seminar: Current Issues and Trends in Counselor Education and Supervision4 s.h.
Recent trends, including debates and findings in literature related to best practices for the profession.
 
RCE:7459 Seminar: Leadership and Advocacy in Counselor Education and Supervision3 s.h.
Leadership principles and theories, including applications to counselor education; student leadership potential and skills explored through self‑reflective model.
 
RCE:7460 Seminar: Research in Counseling3 s.h.
Methods, examples, ethics, multicultural issues, problems of counseling research. Requirements: Ph.D. enrollment
 
RCE:7461 Practicum in Researcharr.
Experience designing and implementing research relevant to student's plan of study, under supervision of rehabilitation and counselor education faculty member.
 
RCE:7462 Advanced Practicum in Clinical Teaching1-3 s.h.
Preparation for doctoral students to conduct didactic and experiential learning opportunities with counselors in training. Prerequisites: RCE:7454
 
RCE:7465 Internship in Counselor Education1-3 s.h.
Supervised experience in professional counseling, counselor supervision, consultation, teaching counseling; field placement and seminar.
 
RCE:7493 Ph.D. Thesisarr.