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This is a draft edition of the 2014-15 Catalog; the final edition will be published in late summer 2014.

Educational Policy and Leadership Studies

Chair

  • Debora L. Liddell

Program coordinator, educational leadership

  • Elizabeth Hollingworth

Program coordinator, higher education and student affairs

  • Jodi Linley

Program coordinator, schools, culture, and society

  • Christine A. Ogren

Faculty

Professors

  • David B. Bills, Kenneth G. Brown, Ronald S. Fielder, Susan M. Lagos Lavenz, Christopher C. Morphew, Ernest T. Pascarella, Michael B. Paulsen, Donald B. Yarbrough

Associate professors

  • Marcus J. Haack, Elizabeth Hollingworth, Debora L. Liddell, Christine L. McCarthy, Christine A. Ogren, Chet S. Rzonca, Katrina Sanders, Sherry K. Watt

Assistant professors

  • Brian P. An, Cassie Barnhardt

Adjunct assistant professors

  • Andrew Beckett, David L. Grady, Wayne Jacobson, Heidi B. Levine, Becki S. Elkins Nesheim, Dorothy M. Persson, Von Stange

Professors emeriti

  • Larry D. Bartlett, Sandra B. Damico, Walter J. Foley, Lelia B. Helms, Alan B. Henkin, Jerry N. Kuhn, H. Bradley Sagen, Elizabeth J. Whitt

Associate professors emeriti

  • Robert E. Engel, Scott F. McNabb, Ray A. Muston, Carolyn L. Wanat, Sara C. Wolfson
Graduate degrees: M.A. in educational policy and leadership studies; Ed.S. in educational policy and leadership studies; Ph.D. in educational policy and leadership studies
Web site: http://www.education.uiowa.edu/epls/

The Department of Educational Policy and Leadership Studies offers academic programs that prepare administrators, professional personnel, teachers, and researchers in the fields of educational leadership, higher education and student affairs, and schools, culture, and society. The department also offers joint programs with other College of Education departments and with other University of Iowa colleges.

Graduate Programs of Study

  • Master of Arts in educational policy and leadership studies
  • Specialist in Education in educational policy and leadership studies
  • Doctor of Philosophy in educational policy and leadership studies

The department offers graduate degree programs in three major areas within educational policy and leadership studies:

Educational leadership (offered in the M.A., Ed.S., and Ph.D.), including an interdisciplinary program in school curriculum and assessment policy (offered in the Ed.S.);
Higher education and student affairs (offered in the M.A., Ed.S., and Ph.D.); and
Schools, culture, and society (offered in the M.A. and Ph.D.).

The areas are described below under "Graduate Study Areas," followed by information about each degree program.

Applicants for admission to University of Iowa graduate degree programs must meet the admission requirements of the Graduate College; see the Manual of Rules and Regulations of the Graduate College or the Graduate College section of the Catalog.

REQUIRED Ph.D. RESEARCH COURSES

All College of Education Ph.D. students must complete EALL:5150 (07X:150) Introduction to Educational Research during the first year of their Ph.D. program. They also must complete an additional minimum of 15 s.h. in qualitative and quantitative course work, with at least 9 s.h. from one area (qualitative or quantitative) and at least 6 s.h. from the other. Courses to meet this requirement must be chosen from Required Ph.D. Research Courses.

Graduate Study Areas

Educational Leadership

Study in educational leadership prepares individuals for leadership positions. In addition to graduate degree programs, the area includes principal licensure and superintendent endorsement.

Licensure

To be eligible for recommendation by The University of Iowa for licensure in Iowa as a principal or superintendent/area education agency administrator, students must complete the appropriate program. The specific requirements for each program are available from the Department of Educational Policy and Leadership Studies and the Office of Education Services.

Students who hold an M.A. must satisfy all core requirements and must complete at The University of Iowa the minimum semester-hour program for each licensure level they seek. Because each administrative license has specific requirements, candidates are required to plan their programs with their advisors' approval.

Superintendent Endorsement

The superintendent endorsement curriculum is designed to prepare individuals for licensure as a school superintendent (pre-K-12) as well as for other school district leadership positions; for the chief administrator position in Iowa's area education agencies (AEA) as well as other AEA leadership positions; and for leadership positions in state or federal departments of education and related agencies.

The superintendent endorsement requires a total of 30 s.h. of credit.

Higher Education and Student Affairs

Advanced study in higher education and student affairs draws upon diverse perspectives from varied disciplines and professional fields to analyze critical issues and policies and their effects on students, faculty, administrators, staff, and other members of the higher education community. It also explores the complex interactive relationships among institutions of higher education, the external environment, and society at large.

Graduate degree programs in higher education and student affairs prepare professionals and scholar practitioners to serve as administrators, researchers, educators, and analysts in institutions of higher and postsecondary education and in related public and private agencies. The programs provide opportunities for concentrated study in student affairs administration; higher education policy and leadership; teaching, learning, and curriculum; and cultural foundations of higher education.

Schools, Culture, and Society

Schools, culture, and society is an interdisciplinary area that enhances students' ability to analyze the influence of social, historical, and philosophical factors that frame contemporary issues in the formal social enterprise of education.

M.A.: Educational Leadership

The Master of Arts program in educational leadership requires a minimum of 36 s.h. of graduate credit and is offered without thesis. The program prepares individuals for appointments as school principals and for positions in area education agencies and state departments of education.

CORE REQUIREMENTS

With the aid of an advisor, each M.A. student prepares a plan of study that includes the following core requirements.

EPLS:6201 (07B:201) Foundations of School Administration3 s.h.
EPLS:6236 (07B:236) Administration of Students with Special Needs3 s.h.
EPLS:6242 (07B:242) Research for Effective School Leaders3 s.h.
EPLS:6260 (07B:260) Contemporary Management Strategies for the Pre-K-12 Principal3 s.h.
EPLS:6285 (07B:285) School and Community Relationships3 s.h.
EPLS:6298 (07B:298) Legal Aspects of School Personnel3 s.h.
EPLS:6381 (07B:381) Analysis and Appraisal of Curriculum3 s.h.
EPLS:6383 (07B:383) Supervision and Evaluation3 s.h.

For Iowa licensure as a principal, students must meet the human relations requirement of the State of Iowa. Students must complete the core requirements listed above and the following required clinical courses.

EPLS:6400 (07B:400) Early Childhood Leadership Clinical2-3 s.h.
EPLS:6401 (07B:401) Elementary Leadership Clinical1-3 s.h.
EPLS:6402 (07B:402) Secondary Leadership Clinical1-3 s.h.
EPLS:6403 (07B:403) Special Education Leadership Clinical1-3 s.h.

Students earning an M.A. without principal licensure are not required to complete the clinical courses. Instead, they complete a series of electives approved by their advisors.

COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION

The M.A. comprehensive examination for students earning principal licensure consists of a three-hour examination and a presentation of the student's ePortfolio. Students earning an M.A. without licensure complete a six-hour comprehensive examination consisting of two three-hour written exams. Students must be registered in the Graduate College during their comprehensive examination semester if they plan to graduate at the end of that semester.

ADMISSION

Applicants to the M.A. program in educational leadership must meet the admission requirements of the Graduate College. Admission decisions are made through a faculty review process. Factors considered include recommendations, grade-point average, Graduate Record Examination (GRE) General Test scores, an essay demonstrating writing ability, and other evidence of academic ability and professional promise.

Ed.S.: Educational Leadership

The Specialist in Education program in educational leadership requires 36 s.h. of graduate credit. The program prepares candidates to be superintendents in Iowa or to hold other district-level leadership positions in K-12 school districts. It also prepares them for appointments as area education agency chief administrators and for jobs in state or federal departments of education.

Students in the Ed.S. program must have an Iowa administration license. They obtain the superintendent endorsement (State of Iowa endorsement 171) upon completing the required Ed.S. course work.

Ed.S. students must complete 26 s.h. of course work. Many educational leadership courses are offered by distance education; see ISIS for information about courses offered during current semesters. They also must complete 10 s.h. of clinical work and must maintain an ePortfolio. The Ed.S. program culminates with the student's presentation of the ePortfolio to his or her committee.

ADMISSION

Applicants to the Ed.S. program in educational leadership must meet the admission requirements of the Graduate College and of the educational leadership program. Required application materials include transcripts, official Graduate Record Examination (GRE) General Test scores, three letters of recommendation, and a personal statement of career goals. Admission is based on grade-point average and GRE scores, promise for scholarly and professional growth, and recommendations. Complete applications are reviewed as they are received.

Ph.D.: Educational Leadership

The Doctor of Philosophy program in educational leadership requires a minimum of 90 s.h. of graduate credit. The program prepares scholarly professionals for leadership positions in a wide range of educational and public sector settings. Ph.D. students acquire strong backgrounds in leadership, policy, and research. They equip themselves to discover, integrate, and apply knowledge as transformational leaders.

The Ph.D. in educational leadership requires the following work.

Common courses12 s.h.
Cognates9 s.h.
Electives29 s.h.
Concentration area courses12 s.h.
Research18 s.h.

Students also complete the comprehensive examination and a dissertation, described below.

Many educational leadership courses are offered by distance education; see ISIS for information about courses offered during current semesters.

REQUIRED RESEARCH COURSES

All College of Education Ph.D. students must complete EALL:5150 (07X:150) Introduction to Educational Research during the first year of their Ph.D. program. They also must complete an additional minimum of 15 s.h. in qualitative and quantitative course work, with at least 9 s.h. from one area (qualitative or quantitative) and at least 6 s.h. from the other. Courses to meet this requirement must be chosen from Required Ph.D. Research Courses.

COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION

Ph.D. students must satisfactorily complete a written take-home comprehensive examination consisting of three parts. The first part covers the student's major area of study, and the second covers two additional concentration areas. The third is on the student's outside area of study and is prepared by faculty members outside the Department of Educational Policy and Leadership Studies. The written exams are followed by an oral examination.

DISSERTATION

All students must write a dissertation based on an original research project in an area of educational leadership. Students must earn 10 s.h. of credit for dissertation research. The doctoral program culminates with a final oral defense of the dissertation. Students must be registered at The University of Iowa during the session in which they graduate.

ADMISSION

Applicants to the Ph.D. program in educational leadership must meet the admission requirements of the Graduate College and of the educational leadership program. They also must satisfy the residency requirement of two full-time (at least 9 s.h.) registrations. Required application materials include transcripts, official Graduate Record Examination (GRE) General Test scores, three letters of recommendation, and a personal statement of career goals. Admission is based on grade-point average and GRE scores, promise for scholarly and professional growth, and recommendations. Complete applications are reviewed as they are received.

Ed.S.: School Curriculum and Assessment Policy

The Specialist in Education program in school curriculum and assessment policy requires 36 s.h. of graduate credit beyond the master's degree (required credit may vary depending on the student's academic background, experiences, needs, and interests).

The interdisciplinary program trains graduate students to become school leaders who know how to use assessment information for accountability purposes and curriculum evaluation. The program offers concentrations in policy, measurement and statistics, and curriculum and draws on course work from across the College of Education. Graduates are qualified to serve as educational leaders in the areas of school policy, assessment, and curriculum at federal, state, and district levels.

For more information on the educational leadership programs, see Department of Educational Policy and Leadership Studies.

M.A.: Higher Education and Student Affairs

The Master of Arts program in higher education and student affairs requires a minimum of 40 s.h. of graduate credit. The program prepares graduates for entry-level and midlevel positions in two- and four-year institutions.

Students choose one of two tracks when they apply to the program: student affairs or higher education policy/administration. Through these two tracks, the program prepares individuals for positions in advising, programming, administration, assessment, management, and policy in higher education settings.

Examinations

Students complete a take-home written examination based on the core and their chosen track.

ADMISSION

Applicants to the M.A. program in higher education and student affairs must meet the admission requirements of the Graduate College. Admission is based on grade-point average, Graduate Record Examination (GRE) General Test scores, and promise for professional growth. Transcripts, GRE scores, a résumé or curriculum vita, three letters of recommendation, and a statement of educational goals are required. Application deadline is January 15 for admission the following fall. Applicants who are recommended for admission will be invited to campus during the spring Campus Visit Day, at which time they will interview for assistantships. Full-time M.A. students must be employed in a half-time graduate assistantship.

Ed.S.: Higher Education and Student Affairs

The Specialist in Education program in higher education and student affairs requires 60 s.h. of graduate credit. The program provides advanced graduate study in administration, policy studies, and specializations developed in consultation with the advisor. The Ed.S. also may be awarded upon completion of a joint program of graduate work in higher education and an academic field, or upon completion of a higher education sequence following a master's degree program.

REQUIRED COURSES

The Ed.S. program of study must include at least 18 s.h. in professional education and related fields, including an appropriate structured internship determined in consultation with the advisor; at least 28 s.h. in the student's specialization area and 10 s.h. of electives, all approved by the advisor; and 4 s.h. of research credit in EPLS:7395 (07B:395) Educational Specialist Research.

COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION

The comprehensive examination consists of a take-home written exam covering the field of higher education and student affairs and the student's concentration area. The written exams may be followed by an oral exam.

RELATED FIELD

Students majoring in another field who want to complete a related field in higher education and student affairs should consult with a higher education and student affairs faculty member early in their study. Plans of study are developed individually.

TEACHING INTERNSHIP

Program participants teach half-time for a full semester at a cooperating community college under the supervision of an experienced faculty member in that college and with field supervision from The University of Iowa. Interns participate in the academic life of the host community college, and they often gather data for their Ed.S. research project during the internship. Participants must be willing to travel to a community college and reside there for the one-semester program. This requirement may be waived by the program faculty.

ADMISSION

Applicants to the Ed.S. program in higher education and student affairs must meet the admission requirements of the Graduate College. Admission is based on grade-point average, GRE General Test scores, and promise for professional growth. Transcripts, GRE scores, three letters of recommendation, and a statement of educational goals are required. Applications must be submitted well in advance of the intended semester of admission.

Ph.D.: Higher Education and Student Affairs

The Doctor of Philosophy program in higher education and student affairs requires 90 s.h. of graduate credit. The program prepares faculty and scholar practitioners for leadership positions in student affairs and academic administration and for positions as graduate faculty members, leaders in conducting research about college students and higher education, policy analysts in postsecondary institutions and in public or private agencies, and teachers and academic leaders at two-year and four-year colleges.

The program integrates the academic experience with the cocurricular learning experiences of students and studies the outcomes of both. The curriculum is organized around three core areas: higher education administration and policy; teaching, learning, and the college experience; and diversity, equity, and foundations of higher education. Students take courses in each area and specialize in one.

The higher education administration and policy area studies organizational policy, leadership, and change. It helps administrators develop expertise in planning, evidence-based decision making, and effective leadership and organizational management. Individuals interested in enrollment management and institutional research should find this area appealing.

The teaching, learning, and the college experience area studies college teaching and learning and the ways in which college affects students. It enables educators to become more effective in designing, implementing, and evaluating powerful curricular and cocurricular initiatives. It should appeal to teaching faculty, institutional researchers, faculty development professionals, and leaders of student success initiatives.

The diversity, equity, and foundations of higher education area helps educators prepare to lead social change within their organizations and to facilitate difficult dialogues designed for interpersonal growth and development. It should appeal to chief diversity officers and other administrators called upon to develop curricula around social justice and to individuals interested in the empirical study of diversity in higher education.

The 90 s.h. required for the Ph.D. includes a substantive common core (24 s.h.), a research core (18 s.h.), a specialization (12 s.h.), graduate electives (24 s.h.), and dissertation research (12 s.h.).

Each doctoral student must successfully complete two semesters on campus (minimum of 9 s.h. each semester) to fulfill the residency requirement of the Graduate College.

Substantive Common Core

The substantive common core provides foundational understanding of higher education and general knowledge that all students must master, regardless of their career goals and interests. All courses in the core (24 s.h.) must be completed at The University of Iowa.

EPLS:6216 (07B:216) Finance in Higher Education3 s.h.
EPLS:6220 (07B:220) History of Higher Education3 s.h.
EPLS:6221 (07B:221) The College Curriculum3 s.h.
EPLS:6224 (07B:224) Organizational Theory and Administrative Behavior3 s.h.
EPLS:6225 (07B:225) Introduction to Public Policymaking3 s.h.
EPLS:6273 (07B:273) The College Student3 s.h.
EPLS:6275 (07B:275) Diversity and Equity in Higher Education3 s.h.
EPLS:7432 (07B:432) Multicultural Initiatives3 s.h.
RESEARCH CORE

The research core (18 s.h.) assures that the student achieves scholarly autonomy and initiative.

All College of Education Ph.D. students must complete EALL:5150 (07X:150) Introduction to Educational Research during the first year of their Ph.D. program. They also must complete an additional minimum of 15 s.h. in qualitative and quantitative course work, with at least 9 s.h. from one area (qualitative or quantitative) and at least 6 s.h. from the other. Courses to meet this requirement must be chosen from Required Ph.D. Research Courses. Course selections must be consistent with the following research core requirements.

All students take the following four courses, or their equivalents, as approved by the advisor and the course instructor.

EPLS:6206 (07B:206) Research Process and Design3 s.h.
EPLS:7373 (07B:373) Qualitative Research Design and Methods3 s.h.
EALL:5150 (07X:150) Introduction to Educational Research (taken during first year in program)3 s.h.
PSQF:6243 (07P:243) Intermediate Statistical Methods4 s.h.

In addition, students and their advisors choose at least three more research courses appropriate to the student's research interests.

specialization AREA

The specialization gives students the opportunity to develop expertise in one area. Most students complete the common core before declaring one of the following three specializations: higher education administration and policy; teaching, learning, and the college experience; or diversity, equity, and foundations of higher education. Each specialization has its own course requirements and options.

GRADUATE ELECTIVES

Students choose 24 s.h. of elective graduate course work in consultation with their advisors. The student and his or her advisor may determine that some of the graduate elective work may be drawn from appropriate previous graduate course work that complements other aspects of the student's doctoral program.

COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION

The Ph.D. comprehensive examination consists of a set of take-home questions with a limited time to respond. Questions are based on the substantive core, the student's concentration, and research core content. The written examination is followed by an oral examination.

DISSERTATION

The dissertation is a major research study planned in collaboration with the student's advisor. Students must write a formal dissertation proposal and submit it for approval, first to their advisor and then to the members of their doctoral committee. Students and their advisors determine when the proposal is complete. Students must earn 12 s.h. of dissertation research credit. The doctoral program culminates with a final oral defense of the dissertation.

Students must be registered at The University of Iowa each fall and spring semester from the semester in which they complete their comprehensive examination through the semester in which they defend their dissertation and graduate.

ADMISSION

Applicants to the Ph.D. program in higher education and student affairs must meet the admission requirements of the Graduate College. Each applicant must submit a personal statement explaining his or her professional goals, experiences, and research plans; undergraduate and graduate grade-point averages; undergraduate and graduate transcripts; three letters of recommendation; a résumé or curriculum vita, and scores on the Graduate Record Exam (GRE) General Test. Application deadline is December 15 for admission the following fall.

For more information on higher education and student affairs programs, see Department of Educational Policy and Leadership Studies.

M.A.: Schools, Culture, and Society

The Master of Arts program in schools, culture, and society requires a minimum of 32 s.h. of graduate credit and is offered without thesis. The program develops students' ability to analyze the influence of social, historical, and philosophical factors that frame contemporary issues in education.

M.A. students complete at least 24 s.h. in schools, culture, and society courses in three disciplinary areas: philosophy, history, and sociology. They earn 12 s.h. in one of the disciplinary areas and 6 s.h. in each of the other two areas. The remaining 8 s.h. of course work must be in a concentration area appropriate to the student's career and academic goals.

Students must satisfactorily complete a six-hour comprehensive examination covering the program's three disciplinary areas and the student's concentration area. The examining committee may elect to hold an oral examination after the exam.

ADMISSION

Applicants to the M.A. program in schools, culture, and society must meet the admission requirements of the Graduate College. A personal interview with one or more members of the program's faculty is recommended. Students in the program find an undergraduate and/or graduate emphasis in education, philosophy, history, sociology, or the humanities to be good background for schools, culture, and society, although other areas of study may also be useful. Each applicant must submit a personal statement explaining his or her professional goals, experiences, and research plans; undergraduate and graduate grade-point averages; undergraduate and graduate transcripts; three letters of recommendation; a résumé; and scores on the Graduate Record Exam (GRE) General Test. Application deadline is February 15 for admission the following fall.

Ph.D.: Schools, Culture, and Society

The Doctor of Philosophy program in schools, culture, and society requires a minimum of 90 s.h. of graduate credit. The program develops students' ability to analyze the influence of social, historical, and philosophical factors that frame contemporary issues in education.

Ph.D. students complete a common core (12 s.h.), a disciplinary foundation (12 s.h.), an interdisciplinary focus (9 s.h.), cognate courses (27 s.h.), research tools (18 s.h.), and a dissertation (12 s.h.).

COMMON CORE

All Ph.D. students in schools, culture, and society must complete all four courses in the common core (12 s.h.).

EPLS:5102 (07B:102) History of American Education3 s.h.
EPLS:5126 (07B:126) Twentieth-Century Educational Movements2-3 s.h.
EPLS:5130 (07B:130) Sociology of Education3 s.h.
EPLS:5156 (07B:156) Philosophies of Education3 s.h.
DISCIPLINARY FOUNDATION

Students choose one of three disciplinary foundation areas: sociology, history, or philosophy. They complete 12 s.h. in the area by taking three courses offered by the Department of Educational Policy and Leadership Studies (prefix EPLS) and one course offered by the corresponding department in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences: sociology (prefix SOC), history (prefix HIST), or philosophy (prefix PHIL). The following lists provide examples of courses appropriate for the three disciplinary foundation areas.

Sociology:

EPLS:5131 (07B:131) Race, Class, and Gender Inequalities in Education3 s.h.
EPLS:5142 (07B:142) Sociology of Higher Education3 s.h.
EPLS:5210 (07B:210) Education and Social Change2-3 s.h.
EPLS:5240 (07B:240) Topics in Education (topic: sociology of education)arr.

History:

EPLS:5123 (07B:123) History of Ethnic/Minority Education2-3 s.h.
EPLS:5240 (07B:240) Topics in Education (topic: history of education)arr.
EPLS:6220 (07B:220) History of Higher Education3 s.h.
EPLS:6237 (07B:237) History of the Teaching Profession3 s.h.
EPLS:6238 (07B:238) Gender and Education in Historical Perspective3 s.h.

Philosophy:

EPLS:5155 (07B:155) Critical Thinking3 s.h.
EPLS:5157 (07B:157) Ethics in Education3 s.h.
EPLS:5158 (07B:158) John Dewey and Education2-3 s.h.
EPLS:5240 (07B:240) Topics in Education (topic: philosophy of education)arr.
EPLS:6358 (07B:358) Seminar in the Philosophy of John Dewey3 s.h.
INTERDISCIPLINARY FOCUS

Students choose one of two interdisciplinary focus areas: diversity and equity, or policy contexts. They take three courses in that area (total of 9 s.h.) chosen from the corresponding list below. At least two of the courses (6 s.h.) must be from outside their disciplinary foundation area (see "Disciplinary Foundation" above).

Diversity and equity:

EPLS:5120 (07B:120) Teaching in a Culturally Diverse Society2-3 s.h.
EPLS:5123 (07B:123) History of Ethnic/Minority Education2-3 s.h.
EPLS:5154 (07B:154) Education, Race, and Ethnicity2-3 s.h.
EPLS:5157 (07B:157) Ethics in Education3 s.h.
EPLS:6237 (07B:237) History of the Teaching Profession3 s.h.
EPLS:6238 (07B:238) Gender and Education in Historical Perspective3 s.h.
EPLS:6275 (07B:275) Diversity and Equity in Higher Education3 s.h.
A relevant course from another department, with advisor's approval

Policy contexts:

EPLS:5134 (07B:134) Education and the World of Work2-3 s.h.
EPLS:5157 (07B:157) Ethics in Education3 s.h.
EPLS:5210 (07B:210) Education and Social Change2-3 s.h.
EPLS:6225 (07B:225) Introduction to Public Policymaking3 s.h.
EPLS:6228 (07B:228) Policy Design and Implementation2-3 s.h.
EPLS:6237 (07B:237) History of the Teaching Profession3 s.h.
One relevant course from another department, with advisor's approval
COGNATE COURSES

Students earn a maximum of 27 s.h. in College of Liberal Arts and Sciences (CLAS) courses that are relevant to their program of study. CLAS courses taken to fulfill the disciplinary foundation requirement or the interdisciplinary focus requirement do not count toward the cognate course requirement. Relevant courses completed in earlier graduate study may be accepted for this requirement.

RESEARCH TOOLS
 

The research tool requirement is 18 s.h. All College of Education Ph.D. students must complete EALL:5150 (07X:150) Introduction to Educational Research during the first year of their Ph.D. program. They also must complete an additional minimum of 15 s.h. in qualitative and quantitative course work, with at least 9 s.h. from one area (qualitative or quantitative) and at least 6 s.h. from the other. Courses to meet this requirement must be chosen from Required Ph.D. Research Courses. Students must complete one research course (3 s.h.) on the use of quantitative research in policy evaluation [e.g., EPLS:6370 (07B:370) Quantitative Methods for Policy Analysis]. Students should choose research courses in consultation with their advisors.

COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION

The comprehensive examination consists of three take-home exams, each with a maximum of 12 pages. The first exam covers the common core, the second covers the student's interdisciplinary focus area, and the third covers the student's disciplinary foundation area.

DISSERTATION

After completing the comprehensive examination, Ph.D. students write a formal dissertation prospectus and submit it for approval first to their dissertation advisor and then to the members of their dissertation committee. The dissertation prospectus must be formally approved by the dissertation advisor and the dissertation committee before the student may begin his or her dissertation research.

Students must earn 12 s.h. of dissertation research credit. The dissertation process culminates with a final oral defense of the dissertation. Students must register at The University of Iowa each fall and spring semester until the dissertation is successfully defended and the Ph.D. is awarded.

ADMISSION

Applicants to the Ph.D. program in schools, culture, and society must meet the admission requirements of the Graduate College. A personal interview with one or more members of the program's faculty is recommended. Students in the program find an undergraduate and/or graduate emphasis in education, philosophy, history, sociology, or the humanities to be good background for schools, culture, and society, although other areas of study may also be useful. Each applicant must submit a personal statement explaining his or her professional goals, experiences, and research plans; undergraduate and graduate grade-point averages; undergraduate and graduate transcripts; three letters of recommendation; and scores on the Graduate Record Exam (GRE) General Test. Admission is for fall semester entry. Application deadline is January 15 for admission the following fall.

For more information on schools, culture, and society programs, see Department of Educational Policy and Leadership Studies.

Courses

Lower-Level Undergraduate

EPLS:1029 (07B:029) First-Year Seminar1 s.h.
Small discussion class taught by a faculty member; topics chosen by instructor; may include outside activities (e.g., films, lectures, performances, readings, visits to research facilities). Requirements: first‑ or second‑semester standing.
 
EPLS:2098 (07B:098) The Student Affairs Profession3 s.h.
Introduction to field of student affairs in context of higher education; focus on foundations of profession, including a brief history of field, professional associations, institutional differences, professional and ethical standards, functional areas in higher education, student learning and developmental theory, overview of graduate preparation, and current topics.
 

Upper-Level Undergraduate and Graduate

EPLS:3000 (07B:103) Foundations of Education3 s.h.
Overview of American education, preschool through secondary; aims, history, philosophy of education; professional ethics, legal responsibilities; school curriculum, organization, finance, school law, political and social issues.
 
EPLS:4081 (07B:181) ePortfolio Production1-2 s.h.
Experience producing an ePortfolio and uploading it to the Internet; practical experience using digital tools, content and design related to ePortfolio production; experience using a web browser and access to the Internet and to a digital camera or scanner. Requirements: able to perform basic computer functions and use a World Wide Web browser. Same as PSQF:4081 (07P:181), EALL:4081 (07X:181), EDTL:4081 (07E:181), RCE:4081 (07C:181).
 
EPLS:4110 (07B:110) Administration and Policy in Gifted Education2 s.h.
Policy, administrative, evaluation issues in developing and maintaining gifted programs in a school setting; participants develop gifted program and policies for a school; for school executives and coordinators of gifted programs.
 
EPLS:4111 (07B:111) Evaluation of Gifted Programs1 s.h.
Fundamentals of program evaluation essential for exemplary gifted programs.
 
EPLS:4113 (07B:113) Staff Development for Gifted Programs1 s.h.
Planning, content, and delivery of staff development regarding gifted students and their needs.
 
EPLS:4150 (07B:150) Leadership and Public Service I3 s.h.
Preparation for providing public service to a local community; leadership skills for effective mentoring of children in grades 6‑10.
 
EPLS:4151 (07B:151) Leadership and Public Service II2 s.h.
Preparation to provide leadership and public service to a local community agency; being a leader and a public servant in the context of societal oppressions such as racism, sexism, able‑bodyism; part of the human relations minor. Prerequisites: EPLS:4150 (07B:150).
 
EPLS:4180 (07B:180) Human Relations for the Classroom Teacher3 s.h.
Influence of social factors such as discrimination, diversity, equity, racism, sexism, and ethnic and socioeconomic pluralism on American schools and classrooms; for teacher education candidates. GE: Values, Society, and Diversity.
 

Graduate

EPLS:5100 (07B:100) Issues and Policies in Higher Education3 s.h.
Development of the idea of a university; selected functions, issues, policies of American higher education.
 
EPLS:5102 (07B:102) History of American Education3 s.h.
Purposes of public education, diversity, and control of schooling from a historical perspective; emphasis on conflicting interpretations of pivotal events and educational movements; connections between educational policies and larger historical developments.
 
EPLS:5104 (07B:104) Education in the Third World2-3 s.h.
Educational implications of various development issues, including role of media, and multinational corporations and foreign aid; educational dilemmas currently facing Third World governments.
 
EPLS:5116 (07B:116) Characteristics of Effective Instruction: Assessment for Learning3 s.h.
Professional development sequence designed for practicing teachers to develop conceptual knowledge and understanding of Assessment for Learning implementation and practice, a key component of effective instruction; training modules are aligned with the Iowa Department of Education's "Characteristics of Effective Instruction," with videos of best practice across the state.
 
EPLS:5120 (07B:120) Teaching in a Culturally Diverse Society2-3 s.h.
Issues in education and individual educators' own practice related to increasing cultural, racial, and linguistic diversity; challenges, concerns.
 
EPLS:5122 (07B:122) History of School Leadership in the United States3 s.h.
History of public school administration; 19th‑century crusade of Horace Mann and other common‑school reformers, social‑efficiency movement of early 20th century; gender issues, parental involvement in history of school leadership.
 
EPLS:5123 (07B:123) History of Ethnic/Minority Education2-3 s.h.
Educational histories of American ethnic and minority groups; comprehensive understanding of American educational history, context for contemporary educational policy discussions.
 
EPLS:5126 (07B:126) Twentieth-Century Educational Movements2-3 s.h.
Current educational policy debates concerning diversity and equity, historical roots of these policies; historical context for 20th‑century equal education opportunity movements.
 
EPLS:5130 (07B:130) Sociology of Education3 s.h.
Effects of school and school organization on educational outcomes; course‑taking patterns and tracking, desegregation, differences in school sector; focus on entire span of student's academic career; examination of school and organizational effects at the primary, secondary, and postsecondary levels of education. Same as SOC:5130 (034:133).
 
EPLS:5131 (07B:131) Race, Class, and Gender Inequalities in Education3 s.h.
Role of ascribed characteristics (e.g., race, class, gender) on educational opportunities and outcomes; achievement gaps, school desegregation, social and cultural capital, peer influence, family attributes, neighborhood influence, influence of significant others, course‑taking patterns, and educational destinations. Same as SOC:5165 (034:265).
 
EPLS:5134 (07B:134) Education and the World of Work2-3 s.h.
Relationship between education and work in individual and organizational behavior, and between educational and economic systems; economics, psychology, sociology, education.
 
EPLS:5142 (07B:142) Sociology of Higher Education3 s.h.
Sociological approach to study of higher education; issues of inequality and stratification in higher education; focus on relationship between higher education and larger economic and demographic processes; college access, college destinations, attainment, and returns to a college degree. Same as SOC:5680 (034:280).
 
EPLS:5154 (07B:154) Education, Race, and Ethnicity2-3 s.h.
Role of education in ethnic and racial stratification in the United States and other nations; influence of variations in family structure, stratification patterns, institutional constraints in formation of educational aspirations and achievement levels. GE: Values, Society, and Diversity.
 
EPLS:5155 (07B:155) Critical Thinking3 s.h.
Formal and informal logic and probabilistic reasoning; focus on construction and critical analysis of arguments; introduction for students planning research in social foundations.
 
EPLS:5156 (07B:156) Philosophies of Education2,3,5 s.h.
Principal educational philosophers and philosophies that have influenced Western education; emphasis on how philosophical ideas and conflicts have shaped the educational scene.
 
EPLS:5157 (07B:157) Ethics in Education3 s.h.
Major theories of the nature of ethical action and of value judgment; theoretical accounts related to the practical decision making contexts of teaching.
 
EPLS:5158 (07B:158) John Dewey and Education2-3 s.h.
Dewey's philosophy of instrumentalism, with emphasis on his theories of knowledge, valuation, aesthetics, especially as applied to educational theory and practice.
 
EPLS:5165 (07B:165) Introduction to Program and Project Evaluation3 s.h.
Skills and knowledge required for conducting evaluations of products, projects, and programs; recent scholarship on evaluation and project management. Same as PSQF:5165 (07P:165).
 
EPLS:5176 (07B:176) Demographic Techniques for Educational Research3 s.h.
Basic demographic concepts, techniques, resources; life table analysis, enrollment projections, demographic measurement, shift‑share analysis.
 
EPLS:5195 (07B:195) Research in Cross-Cultural Settings3 s.h.
Cultural, psychological, logistical issues in conducting research in foreign settings; development of a research plan, recent debates in ethnographic research literature.
 
EPLS:5210 (07B:210) Education and Social Change2-3 s.h.
Role of educational institutions, in connection with political and economic structures, in the process of social change; illumination of theories of social change through case studies of educational systems in both less‑developed and industrialized nations. Same as SOC:5810 (034:310).
 
EPLS:5230 (07B:230) Alternative Models of Schooling2-3 s.h.
Popular alternatives to K‑12 and postsecondary education; homeschooling, boarding schools, charter schools, magnet schools; construction of a conceptual framework for understanding alternatives.
 
EPLS:5240 (07B:240) Topics in Educationarr.
Seminar for intensive study of one problem, issue, or work field.
 
EPLS:5245 (07B:245) The American Professoriate3 s.h.
Research on college and university faculty members; perspectives on faculty careers, values, beliefs, role in shared governance; tenure process and policies; issues unique to faculty members of color and women faculty members.
 
EPLS:5247 (07B:247) Multiculturalism in Higher Education3 s.h.
Theory and application of multicultural competency in higher education.
 
EPLS:5250 (07B:250) Introduction to Student Affairs3 s.h.
Foundations of student affairs work; overview of institutional cultures, legal issues, ethical principles, standards of practice in student affairs.
 
EPLS:5251 (07B:251) College Students and Their Environments3 s.h.
Characteristics of college students and issues they face; students' institutional, social, cultural environments; impact of environments on student learning, development.
 
EPLS:5252 (07B:252) Administration of Higher Education and Student Affairs3 s.h.
Administrative structures and processes in higher education settings. Requirements: higher education and student affairs major.
 
EPLS:5253 (07B:253) Assessment in Higher Education and Student Affairs3 s.h.
Theories, practices, and issues relevant to assessment of student outcomes and institutional effectiveness in higher education; basic overview of research, assessment, and evaluation; elements of assessment design, including methods for data collection and analysis; relevant ethical and political dilemmas; practical assessment activities. Requirements: M.A. standing in higher education and student affairs program.
 
EPLS:5278 (07B:278) Helping Skills in Student Affairs Work3 s.h.
Development of ability to identify, understand, and intentionally apply the active attending and influencing skills; readings and class presentations.
 
EPLS:6201 (07B:201) Foundations of School Administration3 s.h.
Organization and administration of American public education; principles and concepts of leadership and organizations; socioeconomic, political, and professional factors relating to education and school administration.
 
EPLS:6202 (07B:202) Information Resources3 s.h.
Research strategies, information literacy skills, University of Iowa Libraries and other sources for research.
 
EPLS:6206 (07B:206) Research Process and Design3 s.h.
Research process, with emphasis on fundamentals of experimental design, internal and external validity, correlational designs, and statistical inference.
 
EPLS:6209 (07B:209) Survey Research and Design3 s.h.
Survey design and implementation; writing and evaluation of survey questions; error in survey research; techniques to reduce error; sampling; postcollection processing of survey data. Prerequisites: EPLS:6206 (07B:206) or PSQF:4143 (07P:143). Same as PSQF:6209 (07P:209).
 
EPLS:6216 (07B:216) Finance in Higher Education3 s.h.
Theory, research, policy, and practice related to public and private funding of higher and postsecondary education.
 
EPLS:6217 (07B:217) Theory and Practice of Leadership2-3 s.h.
Theory‑based literature and critiques of leadership as applied to educational institutions.
 
EPLS:6218 (07B:218) The Law and Higher Education3 s.h.
The role of law as it affects postsecondary institutions; analysis of case law in specific areas of concern to administrators, faculty, staff, students.
 
EPLS:6220 (07B:220) History of Higher Education3 s.h.
History of postsecondary education in the United States; emphasis on conflicting interpretations of pivotal developments; consideration of access, curriculum, student life, academic freedom, role of universities in society, and balance of teaching, research and service from a historical perspective.
 
EPLS:6221 (07B:221) The College Curriculum3 s.h.
Issues, principles, policies, and practices in college curriculum development; diverse philosophical, historical, cultural, social, psychological, political foundations of contemporary college curricula; perspectives on and models of college curriculum, related processes of teaching and learning; principles and practices that guide design and change of higher education curriculum.
 
EPLS:6222 (07B:222) Introduction to Policy Analysis and Evaluation3 s.h.
Theoretical and technical approaches to analysis and evaluation of contemporary public policies.
 
EPLS:6224 (07B:224) Organizational Theory and Administrative Behavior3 s.h.
Theories and concepts of organizational behavior applied in structural, organizational, administrative contexts of American education.
 
EPLS:6225 (07B:225) Introduction to Public Policymaking3 s.h.
Overview of state level higher education structures and policies; research on state level policy processes.
 
EPLS:6226 (07B:226) Educational Management2-3 s.h.
Literature and research on management; emphasis on American education.
 
EPLS:6228 (07B:228) Policy Design and Implementation2-3 s.h.
Review of literature, emphasis on policy drafting skills for administration and management in education and other settings.
 
EPLS:6232 (07B:232) Advanced Theory Sociology of Education3 s.h.
Sociology of education; concepts and nature of the field; strengths and weaknesses of theories and paradigms; research. Prerequisites: EPLS:5130 (07B:130).
 
EPLS:6236 (07B:236) Administration of Students with Special Needs3 s.h.
Foundation for and skill practice in tasks performed by directors of special education and others administering to needs of special education students, and economically and socially deprived students; for prospective school administrative personnel. Same as EDTL:6936 (07U:236).
 
EPLS:6237 (07B:237) History of the Teaching Profession3 s.h.
History of public school teaching, and teachers' problematic professional status; teacher education in the 19th and 20th centuries; formation and activities of teacher unions in the 20th century.
 
EPLS:6238 (07B:238) Gender and Education in Historical Perspective3 s.h.
Gender in context of history of education in the United States; coeducation in common schools, academies, and high schools; women's arrival and experiences as college students; masculinity in higher education; single‑sex versus coeducation; emphasis on conflicting historical interpretations. Same as GWSS:6238 (131:238).
 
EPLS:6242 (07B:242) Research for Effective School Leaders3 s.h.
Fundamental language of contemporary research; identification and application of basic research components to contemporary educational leadership problems; applicability of research toward effective decision making.
 
EPLS:6260 (07B:260) Contemporary Management Strategies for the Pre-K-12 Principal3 s.h.
Leadership skills and management techniques for daily organization and operation of schools; emphasis on climate, communication, group processes, conflict resolution, curriculum management.
 
EPLS:6265 (07B:265) Standards-Based Education and Accountability3 s.h.
Standards‑based education; academic content standards, K‑12 articulation, alignment studies, use of standardized test results to evaluate academic programs.
 
EPLS:6270 (07B:270) Policy and Politics of Leadership3 s.h.
Current issues from academic journals, states, think tanks, consortia.
 
EPLS:6273 (07B:273) The College Student3 s.h.
Overview of theories, research, practices, and issues relevant to understanding students in institutions of higher education. Requirements: Ph.D. standing in Higher Education and Student Affairs program.
 
EPLS:6275 (07B:275) Diversity and Equity in Higher Education3 s.h.
Historical, contemporary, theoretical, and empirical aspects of diversity and equity in higher education; unique experiences of members of historically under‑represented groups; challenges of transforming institutions to make them more responsive to the experiences of diverse groups.
 
EPLS:6285 (07B:285) School and Community Relationships3 s.h.
Community analysis, politics and education, power groups and influences, school issues and public responses, public relations strategies.
 
EPLS:6290 (07B:290) Master's Projectarr.
Research for the nonthesis program; topic approved by advisor.
 
EPLS:6293 (07B:293) Individualized Instructionarr.
Readings, special projects, and/or studies that reflect joint instructor/student interest.
 
EPLS:6298 (07B:298) Legal Aspects of School Personnel3 s.h.
Teacher and student: liability, negotiations, rights, privileges, responsibilities of school personnel; principles of law derived from court decisions; constitutional and statutory provisions; for teachers and administrators.
 
EPLS:6301 (07B:301) Professional Seminar in Student Affairs I1 s.h.
Orientation to field; writing and academic support.
 
EPLS:6302 (07B:302) Professional Seminar in Student Affairs II1 s.h.
Working with groups in higher education.
 
EPLS:6303 (07B:303) Professional Seminar in Student Affairs III1 s.h.
Consulting, training, and curriculum development in student affairs.
 
EPLS:6304 (07B:304) Professional Seminar in Student Affairs IV1 s.h.
Professional identity, job search support.
 
EPLS:6311 (07B:311) Seminar: Research Topic in Education2-3 s.h.
Topic submitted by students, faculty.
 
EPLS:6315 (07B:315) Orientation to the Superintendency3 s.h.
Leadership theory and research of the superintendent's role of increasing student achievement; personal goals for communication; ethics, integrity, flexibility, reflective, and collaborative leadership; expectations of the superintendent by the board of directors; defining one's role; developing an entry plan; dealing with social/emotional isolation of superintendency; and influences in the larger political, social, economic, legal, and cultural context.
 
EPLS:6317 (07B:317) Operational Leadership and Management1 s.h.
Managing fiscal and physical resources responsibly, efficiently, and effectively; effective communication of school operations; leadership and management of nutrition program, transportation program, facilities, construction; board policy, legal issues; state reporting, ethical decision‑making; relationship building, problem solving amidst barriers and various stakeholder groups.
 
EPLS:6319 (07B:319) Human Resources Leadership2 s.h.
Leadership theory and research of the superintendent's role of aligning human resources practice and increasing student achievement; employment law; contract negotiations process/collective bargaining; contract maintenance; recruiting, selecting, developing, and retaining employees; working with labor unions and Public Employee Relations Board; special education law; Evaluator 2 Training. Requirements: Evaluator 1 Training.
 
EPLS:6321 (07B:321) Social Advocacy Summit1 s.h.
Summit format; challenges and opportunities in Iowa's K‑12 schools with changing demographics; opportunity for K‑12 school districts and higher education institutions to engage in conversation on how to meet the needs of students and local school districts.
 
EPLS:6323 (07B:323) School Finance2 s.h.
Manage fiscal and physical resources; communicate effectively with internal and external audiences regarding school operations; comply with state and federal mandates and local board policies; align educational programs, plans, actions, and resources with the district vision and goals.
 
EPLS:6325 (07B:325) Organizational and Educational Leadership2 s.h.
Facilitate connections of students and families to health and social services that support a focus on learning as a district level leader in a school district; collaboratively establish a culture that welcomes and honors families and community and seeks ways to engage them in students learning; AEA structure, compliance and regulatory functions including special education.
 
EPLS:6329 (07B:329) Legislative Summit1 s.h.
Collaborate with families and community members, respond to diverse community interests and needs, and mobilize community resources as a district level leader in a school district; work with legislators, build advocacy groups in a community, engage stakeholders, how to lobby legislators and meet with local senate and house representatives to participate in lobbying.
 
EPLS:6332 (07B:332) College Student Psychosocial and Identity Development3 s.h.
Theoretical models of psychosocial and identity development in college students; applications to student affairs work.
 
EPLS:6333 (07B:333) Practicumarr.
Small‑scale research projects; supervised experience in planning, design, management, analysis, reporting of research activities; assignments to current and personal faculty research projects; student assumes major responsibility.
 
EPLS:6334 (07B:334) College Student Learning, Cognitive, and Moral Development3 s.h.
Learning and development of college students; theoretical models of learning, cognitive development, moral development; applications to student affairs work.
 
EPLS:6336 (07B:336) Impact of College on Students3 s.h.
Introduction to literature; career and economic returns, values and attitudes, learning and cognitive development, assessment and methodological issues of studying college outcomes. Prerequisites: EPLS:6206 (07B:206).
 
EPLS:6358 (07B:358) Seminar in the Philosophy of John Dewey3 s.h.
John Dewey and education; extensive reading of the works of Dewey and of contemporary authors who comment on, interpret, or employ Deweyan philosophy. Prerequisites: EPLS:5158 (07B:158).
 
EPLS:6370 (07B:370) Quantitative Methods for Policy Analysis3 s.h.
Methodological strategies for quantitative research; analysis of secondary data to investigate educational issues and policies; recoding variables, summation scaling and factor analysis, missing data, sample design and survey estimation, model building; implementation of linear and binary regression, regression diagnostics; hands‑on experience conducting statistical analysis of social data. Prerequisites: PSQF:4143 (07P:143) and PSQF:6243 (07P:243).
 
EPLS:6381 (07B:381) Analysis and Appraisal of Curriculum3 s.h.
Comprehensive investigation of systematic procedures and resources for identifying and evaluating essential features and constituent elements of a given school district's curricular offering; state and federal requirements of the curricular program; for persons in administration, curriculum, and supervision programs or positions.
 
EPLS:6383 (07B:383) Supervision and Evaluation3 s.h.
Data collection and management skills; data‑driven leadership; coaching and feedback techniques; teacher quality legislation; research and best practice regarding teacher evaluation, supervision; teaching standards.
 
EPLS:6400 (07B:400) Early Childhood Leadership Clinical2-3 s.h.
Classroom instruction and supervised experience with problems in early childhood educational administration; organization, planning, evaluation, decision making.
 
EPLS:6401 (07B:401) Elementary Leadership Clinical1-3 s.h.
Supervised experience working with problems in educational administration, including organization, planning, evaluation, decision making; individual project in a school setting.
 
EPLS:6402 (07B:402) Secondary Leadership Clinical1-3 s.h.
Supervised experience working with problems in educational administration, including organization, planning, evaluation, decision making; individual project in a school setting.
 
EPLS:6403 (07B:403) Special Education Leadership Clinical1-3 s.h.
Supervised experience working with problems in educational administration, including organization, planning, evaluation, decision making; individual project in a school setting.
 
EPLS:6404 (07B:404) Central Administration Clinical1-3 s.h.
Supervised experience working with problems in educational administration, including organization, planning, evaluation, decision making; individual project in a school setting.
 
EPLS:6415 (07B:415) Orientation to the Superintendency: Clinical2 s.h.
Clinical experience aligned with course topics and assignments in a K‑12 school or other educational organization; development of a clinical plan with the guidance of a university professor and local school district mentor based on course requirements, career goals, and interests.
 
EPLS:6417 (07B:417) Operational Leadership Clinical1 s.h.
Clinical experience aligned with course topics and assignments in the operational leadership course; completion of clinical in a K‑12 school or other appropriate educational organization; development of a clinical plan based on course requirements, career goals, and student interests with guidance from a university professor and local school district mentor. 
 
EPLS:6419 (07B:419) Human Resources Leadership Clinical2 s.h.
Clinical experience aligned with course topics and assignments in the human resources leadership course; completion of clinical in a K‑12 school or other appropriate educational organization; development of a clinical plan based on course requirements, career goals, and student interests with guidance from a university professor and local school district mentor.
 
EPLS:6425 (07B:425) Organizational and Educational Leadership Clinical1 s.h.
Clinical experience aligned with course topics and assignments in the organizational and educational leadership course; completion of clinical in a K‑12 school or other appropriate educational organization; development of a clinical plan based on course requirements, career goals, and student interests with guidance from a university professor and local school district mentor.
 
EPLS:7291 (07B:291) Administration of Educational Programs and Personnel3 s.h.
Personnel and program planning examined against statements of educational purpose; interrelationships and internal consistencies of program and staff administration from perspectives of philosophy, psychology, learning theory, sociology, curriculum theory.
 
EPLS:7337 (07B:337) Theoretical Perspectives on Student Affairs Administration3 s.h.
Issues and problems in student affairs administration; theories of organization, administration, leadership. Requirements: enrollment in educational policy and leadership studies Ph.D. program.
 
EPLS:7367 (07B:367) Seminar: Current Issues in Special Education Administrationarr.
New developments in administration; new content each year. Prerequisites: EPLS:6236 (07B:236).
 
EPLS:7373 (07B:373) Qualitative Research Design and Methods3 s.h.
Theory and practice of qualitative research design and methodology; exploratory field experience in collection and analysis of data; individual and focus group interviews, participant observation. Requirements: Ph.D. standing.
 
EPLS:7380 (07B:380) Practicum in College Teachingarr.
Supervised college teaching experience in courses related to major academic areas; collaboration with faculty course instructors.
 
EPLS:7385 (07B:385) Teaching and Learning in Higher Education3 s.h.
Current theoretical and empirical literature on teaching and learning in higher education; focus on development of effective teaching practice. Same as PSQF:7385 (07P:385), GRAD:7385 (650:385), EDTL:7385 (07S:384), RCE:7385 (07C:385).
 
EPLS:7392 (07B:392) Mixed Methods Research3 s.h.
Introduction to mixed methods research in education; knowledge and skills necessary to conduct mixed methods study; history and language of mixed methods research; identification and processing arguments for and against mixed methods research; extend understanding of research in education; how to assess strengths and weaknesses of published mixed methods studies; investigation of one or more mixed methods research designs in depth; application of mixed methods research design to a research proposal.  Prerequisites: EALL:5150 (07X:150). Requirements: formal introduction to quantitative and qualitative research methods, and familiarity with basic steps of research process. Recommendations: direct experience conducting research studies not required. Same as EDTL:7410 (07S:310).
 
EPLS:7395 (07B:395) Educational Specialist Researcharr.
Individual instruction in the design, research, and writing of a research project of significant quality for upper‑level graduate work.
 
EPLS:7431 (07B:431) Seminar: Research on College Students3 s.h.
College student learning and development, outcomes, persistence. Requirements: enrollment in educational policy and leadership studies Ph.D. program.
 
EPLS:7432 (07B:432) Multicultural Initiatives3 s.h.
Impact of culture, race, ethnicity, and intersection of identity in higher education, student affairs, and community agency settings; knowledge, skills, and competencies needed by teachers, student affairs professionals, social workers, counselors, and educational administrators to facilitate individual empowerment through relationships; focus on different ways to design multicultural initiatives to various professional work settings to promote diversity. Requirements: Ph.D. standing or advanced‑level M.A. standing. Recommendations: introductory course on issues of race, culture, gender and/or any course on sociopolitical issues or structural oppression strongly recommended.
 
EPLS:7433 (07B:433) Current Issues in Higher Education and Student Affairs3 s.h.
Current issues related to higher education; opportunity to clarify perspectives; review of literature in a particular area of interest; readings, class discussions, independent research, consultations with professionals in the field, student presentations. Requirements: higher education and student affairs Ph.D. standing.
 
EPLS:7444 (07B:444) Advanced Practicum in Student Affairsarr.
Supervised work experience in student affairs settings.
 
EPLS:7493 (07B:493) Ph.D. Thesisarr.
Supervision of research, design, and writing of Ph.D. thesis; individual instruction.